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This is probably just me, but I thought I'd ask anyway...I'm riding along (just started about a month ago), and I'm feeling pretty confident...due to my newbieness I've tried to stay at speeds below 80km/hr and have stayed mostly on residential streets. I arrive on a clean, empty back road away from the residential area and decide to twist the throttle a little more, hit highway speed, just to get used to the feeling. now because I' m a newbie I still suck at keeping track of what gear I'm in. I shift up, twist the throttle a little bit, and the engine revs loudly, but I go nowhere (same thing that happens when you accidently shift into neutral). Is it possible to...i don't know, overshift on a bike???? it sounds stupid, I know. When I gear down I usually just tap until the shifter doesn't go down anymore, then I know for sure I'm in first...I figured it would be the same for shifting up, but I could be wrong...??? I don't figure it's possible to shift into neutral between 5th and 6th gear, so I'm thinking it's just my newbieness kicking in. This ever happened to anyone?
 

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felix, Sounds like you accidently hit one of the inbetween neutrals. Yes it can happen to all of us.

Be a bit slower in your shifting up to a higher gear & more precise, like once you are at home in riding you can feel it click into the next gear.

Do a quick check to by rolling the bike forward & feeling it is going into gears above first & neutral.

Also you might find that the shift lever is a bit to high & in that way you are not obtaining a sound or precise shift up into that next gear higher.

If you to feel the gear change lever is a bit to high I think on your 440 Kwacker there is a possibly 10mm bolt & nut holding the lever on the spline of the gear change lever shaft. Remove the nut at the end, then the bolt & slide the lever off the spline. Then slide the lever back on only positioned more to your liking.

I have to adjust, especially the gearchange lever, along with rear brake pedal for cold weather & hot weather riding as a difference in thickness of the boots. Fact is you should be able to adjust the position of your clutch & front brake levers as well to suit your riding style, height, etc. Okay so it is limited, but all can be adjusted to some point.
 

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I know smitty has a lot of experience, but I don't understand why you would say shift slower. Shifting to the next gear up needs to be a clean, swift, and precise movement especially when at Speed. This includes the coordination between you left hand and left foot.

Also shifting when the bike is off on a lot of bikes doesn’t help much. I have a harder time finding N on a bike that I’m unfamiliar with if the bike is off.


Just my :2cents:
 

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He is not scooting along at a fast pace & I guess I should have said "slower & more precicely" meaning do not try to shift at a fast speed, especially when there might be a problem in getting into the gears as he seems to run into in-between neutrals. So he wants to know it has clicked into the next higher gear rather then assuming it has only to have the engine scream into higher revs.
 

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Not a big deal and like Smitty said it's probably from your shifting technique. Some bikes require a slower firm pressure, especially when older like your 440.

Only thing I have to add is to ALWAYS shift up when you get into a false neutral.

Also, if it happens a lot no matter how you shift it may be the tranny in need of a rebuild but 99% of the time it's a rushed shift.
 
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