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Discussion Starter #1
I live in minnesota, so i've only had the chance to get out and ride maybe 5 days with half way decent weather. When i'm at a stop light or stop sign, and there's no one around, i'm perfectly fine taking off really slow from a dead stop, but when i'm in traffic and cars sitting behind me at a light, i try to take off a little quicker so no one gets right up on my ass, and as a result i've killed it a few times doing that.

we just got more snow, so i cant take the bike out and practice to figure out what i'm doing wrong, so i wanted to ask and see if i could get an idea of what im doing wrong, so when i do get a chance to get out i'll have an idea of how to correct my problem.

I ride an R1, if it makes a difference. i know where when letting the clutch out it starts to catch and pull forward, no problem with that. i'm pretty sure every time i've killed it, i've been giving it a little gas as i let the clutch out. should i be letting the clutch out a decent amount to get me rolling BEFORE i start giving it gas?

thanks, much appreciated :)
 

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if you let the clutch out too quick you'll kill it or flip it (if your heavy on the throttle). Practice makes perfect :)
 

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Not meaning to come off harsh or anything since I haven't been following any of your other posts but.. are you a new rider? If so... you are seriously learning on an R1? :confused:
yessir, learning on an R1 :) other than the 3 times i've killed it at a stop light in the 10 hours i've put on already, i've been doing quite well.

i could have been letting the clutch out too fast, that was probably my problem, i dunno. i dont think it was because i was heavy on the throttle though. when i say i gave it gas to get going quicker, i held it at ~2-3krpms.
 

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yessir, learning on an R1 :) other than the 3 times i've killed it at a stop light in the 10 hours i've put on already, i've been doing quite well.

i could have been letting the clutch out too fast, that was probably my problem, i dunno. i dont think it was because i was heavy on the throttle though. when i say i gave it gas to get going quicker, i held it at ~2-3krpms.
wow, be careful on the R1. that bike has some sick azz power for a beginner.

try this. reving the motor to 2-3k at take off is ok. try feathering or riding the clutch a little longer when taking off. you can actually rev a little bit higher like at 3k to 3.5k. i wouldnt rev past 3.5k as too much revs and clutching it will bring the front end up. dont worry about the other cars when taking off from a light. fak them. just concentrate and do your thing. its better to take off slow and easy, than flip and wad your bike from being in a hurry or pull an accidential wheelie.

id suggest taking the msf course, and then going to a large empty parking lot and practice taking off froma stop. practice makes perfect. and congrats on the R1. thats one hell of a nice bike. my buddy has an 04 R1, which i rode when i had my older 1997 F3 600 cbr. i rode his R1 1x and immediately sold my F3 2 weeks later and bought my 1000rr. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #6
i made enough space in the garage today to do a little testing, since this snow looks like it'll be here for a few more days at least. i think i was just letting the clutch out too fast. i tried getting going just on clutch, and intentionally letting it out too fast, and found out just how fast it has to be let out to kill. I also tried using some throttle, right around 3k, and got a little better feel using throttle from a stop. as soon as it gets nice out again, ill be visiting a large parking lot to get some more practice with it.

also plan on attending the first MSF course available this season.
 

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This is only natural for you are a newbie trying to learn on one of the fastest trotting bikes in the market. Go back to your first request & not those that have your a lot of warning or what as a more sensible bike to learn on.

Once you have, sort of dominated, the clutch & throttle problem a LOT more will turn up to give you trouble & good chance you will be landing on the pavement with your ear.

I have 61 yrs of riding experience (been in the m/c business on & off for some 40 yrs) so I have delt with a lot of people like you. Even on one make/model of m/c, the 1000cc V-twin Vincent HRD, WE would only sell it to well experienced riders that road sensible & we felt would handle the Vincent well though often we would not sell to some with just a few yrs of experience & were sort of radical riders or riders we knew this bike was to much.

Mind you one of out customers with a used 500cc OHV single road some miles to another city to buy the same bike. Just as he was getting out of the city, I guess he turned up the throttle to much to loose the control & ended up in the ditch, on the opposit side of the road, with a compound leg fracture & some internal injuries.

He never rode after that & here is the doozer for the 500cc he had was with around 25hp at the crank & the Vincent HRD 1000 he purchased only had 49hp so a lot more then his 500cc yet a 500cc parallel twin such as from Suzy or Kawasaki now has around 50hp & your 1000cc is purnching out around 150hp!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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if your riding an R1..you should NOT be stalling the bike out.:eek:

from what i've read its killing because your bogging it down to much. (not enough gas).

try feathering the clutch on take off. just let it out smooth and slow.
and watch your rpms...when letting out the clutch..use the throttle to keep your rmps up. it wont kill then.....ever
 

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Stupid question, joegibs: can you drive a car that has a manual transmission?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Stupid question, joegibs: can you drive a car that has a manual transmission?
yessir. as far as i can tell, it's more or less the same thing, just different hands/feet for each action of the process.

i think i was just letting the clutch out too fast. either way, ill be suiting up in about a half hour to go find a parking lot :)
 

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Once you get the feel for when the clutch starts grabbing, that's the most important thing to know. Everything else is cake from there.
 

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This frustration of stalling reminds me of another form of sport/hobby being h/gun shooting of which I have been the Club's h/gun director/instructor since '47. Basically those asking about the Club, h/gun shooting & such will end up buying a .22 rim fire of revolver or semi-auto of various makes/models. Those that listen to me learn what is best for the money & do well while that do not listen well will buy something lousy for the money.

Some will not listen & here is a prize example. This was a Trap shooter of our Club so asked us a lot of questions. His first gun was the famous 45ACP which was wrong AND the wrong make/model as he bought a cheap Ruger P series. Also (in mind) he had to buy a progressive reloader for in mind it was a good deal. Wrong again for a Turret would have been best. Many of us use Turret reloaders instead of cheap or costly Progressive loaders & are never shot of reloaded ammo or problems with our reloads.

He had a maze of jamming problems & blamed the 45ACP gun, though it was his poor reloading problems. When the gun shot he was lucky to get one round to hit the paper at 25 yds.

I showed him a Ruger MKII 5.5" Bull Barrel & he could hit the paper with it so he bought the Ruger "Hunter" which was really to costly, but a good .22. Took a while for him to land all shots on the paper, but not in tight groups. When he tried his 45ACP with my loads or better reloads of his own---well one or two might hit the paper.

He gets wind of a breathed on Colt 45ACP, an ideal buy, which he buys. Now he starts to hit the paper 2 out or of five so still stuggling though getting better with .22. Only turns to me because the Colt 45 gun is jammed. Reason being one of his reloads was with little powder in it & the next round hit the jammed bullet tip in the bbl to bulged the bbl & jammed the gun. Cost him around $400.00 to get it corrected & after a year he is sometimes getting all five rounds on the target, but his groups are all over the place with the 45ACP while .22 rim fire are much better.

Sounds a bit like someone new to m/cing & buys one of the best does it not????
 

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Im new to riding bikes but not to clutches. In a car one way they teach beginning manual users is to not even touch the gas. Find a flat surface such as your garrage. dont need much space to do this, turn the bike on and just as slowly as possible let out the clutch. Dont touch the gas. Oh and have it in first, forgot about that. Your motor and transmission is synched so you dont have to worry about grinding gears as you would in most cars. Letting it out slowly will actually start the bike to moving. You say you know the position that the clutch starts to engage but you really have to b able to feel it. So just practice that a couple times.

Then if you get some time to go out, or if u can find a warehouse or something. Just practice getting to that point and easing just a little bit on the throttle. My guess is you prolly havent had much experience with clutches, so at a stop your able to ease out comfortably, but w/ pressure your mind begins to have brain farts and you dont realize that its gonna b ok. God forbid your in a situation where you have to move out quickly from a stop, your gonna need to know how to release the clutch and get moving quickly.

I dont know what minesota is like. Im guessing flat but not really sure. If you can find a slight incline, one in which your bike will roll backwards if your not braking but also one which you can stabalize yourself with your feet and not your brake. Practice letting out the clutch and holding yourself on the incline, this isnt exactly gr8 for your tranny but as long as you dont hold it for hours your fine. This reinforces knowing that release point. You can also play around w/ your clutch and gas and find out the best points of engagement and how much throttle your bike likes.

My mazda rx8 likes a lot of throttle @1 then ease off thru the first gear but my bike likes it nice and slow in the beginning. You have an R1 so even w/ barely any throttle your moving. So dont worry about so much about getting off quickly, it comes w/ practice, I would worry much more about making sure they see me.
 

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the power is all in the clutch; no clutch, no power to the wheel.

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Glad to hear that your OK from the laydown. it's good to hear that you have a suit to help manage the R1 satanic power. Like others said (and statistics too) , a bunch of crashes are close to home (where you feel most relaxed/unaware). I have had to many laydowns on my first junker, the big-one was in my home town (relaxed/unaware - sorta). Just be carefull, sand is a biznach.

~~RIDE SAFE, RIDE STRONG:thumbs2:
 

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im new

hey guys im kinda new rider i had dirtbikes all my life and just got a zx-6r had it lowered as im realy short.is this bike too big for me cause i droped it and i cant pick the bike up on my own.sorry wrong spot to post.
 

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I only have experience with manual cars as i have not ridden a bike yet...but an engine is an engine no matter what vehicle it is on. If you are stalling the bike, there can only be one of two explanations why. Either the clutch is being released too fast or you are not giving it enough RPMs.
 

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Hey guys I'm been reading this post and that's some great advice which I didn't know I do not have a bike yet but I well practice in a lot or on a non best street but I sangho ask further about shifting when you get going and goingto shift into second or third you do have to to pull the clutch in right or can you power shift it I know this is a dumb question but I had to ask so when I do get a bike I know I am doing it right and also can you give me tips on down shifting and down shifting when coming to a stop
 

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Take the Motorcycle Safety Foundation Beginner's course. My opinion is that anyone getting into riding would be utterly stupid to not take it. Getting into riding is expensive, so be prepared.
 
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