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Discussion Starter #1
OK, one more question. i looked at my chain's slack length (it's supposed to be 1.0 to 1.4 inches according to user manual) tonight. I didn't know I had to worry about adjusting it until today. I can't tell exactly how much slack it has right now - so my first question, is there an easy way to tell.

Second thing, is adjusting the chain really easy? If not, I'll probably have to take it to the dealer.
 

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I am probably not the right guy to answer this question but...

I only:

1. Lube and Clean My Chain
2. Change my Oil (every 2000 miles)
3. Adjust tire pressure

The rest of the stuff is done at a once-a-year dealer service. I usually do this at the begining of the riding season (spring).

Other than that, I just ride.
 

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ESanders2 said:
oh yeah, I've ridden 3300 miles w/o adjusting it. is this bad?
That's not necessarily bad, but you should be checking the slack regularly. You shouldn't have to adjust it every time, but you want to take good care of your chain! Although that doesn't always prevent it from being thrown! :finger:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
unas--

I checked, and the slack seems to be about 2.0 inches:eek:

I'm gonna have to adjust it, don't know if i can do it myself or not.

One question I had for you- do you lube the chain each time you wash the bike? Or can washing and dealing with the chain be done seperately?
 

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Hi ESanders2-

It is virtually impossible to over-lubricate your chain. It is subjected to incredible amounts of mechanical stress, so the more frequently you are able to show it some T.L.C., the better. Lubrication is cheap insurance.

~ Blue Jays ~
 

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Adjusting the chain is pretty streight forward. It helps to have a stand, but its not required.

Remove the cotter pin from the rear axle nut (Try not to mutalate it too much)
Loosen the rear axle nut (Its on there TIGHT)
Use the two adjuster bolts to tighten the chain
Make sure that the axle is even on both sides (there are marks on the swing arm)
Tighten the rear axle nut (about 150ft/lbs+however much you need to put the cotter pin in there) If you dont have a torque wrench, turn it untill it wont turn anymore, and then turn it some more.

Lubing the chain is not just for rust prevention. It helps the chain not wear out as much. You should lube it every 500 miles or so...
 

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Vash is right on spot. One thing I would suggest though is go to your local hardware spot and pick up a handful of the right cotter pins, in theory you should never reuse cotter pins.

Check your manual for torques on the axel nut, mine is 90 ft-lbs I believe.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
yeah, mine says 80 ft-lbs. I don't have a wrench that large either, the axle nut is bigger than any of the lug nuts on my car tires so I'm out of luck for now. I'll have to decide whether it will cost more to have a shop adjust it, or to buy a heavy-duty wrench.
 

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There should be one in your tool pouch. But you are going to need a cheater bar. I remember lifting the rear of my bike off the ground the first time I tried to get it done.
 

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Blue Jays said:
Hi ESanders2-

It is virtually impossible to over-lubricate your chain. It is subjected to incredible amounts of mechanical stress, so the more frequently you are able to show it some T.L.C., the better. Lubrication is cheap insurance.

~ Blue Jays ~
Correction - it is possible to over-lubricate your chain causing excess lube to be flung onto the motorcycle, rider, street, etc. The other thing to keep in mind is that lube will attract (and hold) dirt and debris so keeping the amount of lube to a tolerable level is the best method.

The real secret to chain maintenance is frequency. You don't have to perform a full service everytime you ride, but wiping down the chain and applying a bit of new, clean lube after a ride is a good idea. One of the quickest tricks I've seen is to apply some fresh lube to a cloth/towel and then run that over the chain as if you're trying to wipe all the dirt off of it. Do the same thing to the teeth on the sprockets.
 

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Hi slaintedan-

Removing excess lubricant, contaminants, and filthy grit clearly goes without saying. The idea being that if a rider cleans and lubricates their chain faithfully and frequently he or she doesn't have much to lose.

~ Blue Jays ~
 

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Blue Jays said:
Hi slaintedan-

Removing excess lubricant, contaminants, and filthy grit clearly goes without saying. The idea being that if a rider cleans and lubricates their chain faithfully and frequently he or she doesn't have much to lose.

~ Blue Jays ~

Ditto! :thumbs2:
 
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