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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all you electronic genius'es. Since I just got my new Y2K R1 six weeks ago , needless to say I am A TAD paranoid about it getting lifted. I purchased a "gorilla" alarm.It is a great alarm, but I had to mount it under the fairing. As a result it is not as loud as I would like it.
My question is -- is there any way to connect it to the horn and use the horn in conjuction with the alarm. My guess is it shouldn't be more difficult than a couple of wires.

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chAAAaa bro...this is an easy one. Not sayin' that to make you feel stupid by any means, just that I worked with wiring and electrical systems for years, so I have some decent background.

Supplies:
1- Good pair of crimpers/cutters
2- pkg. of butt connectors (blue: 14-16ga.)
3- A few feet of 18ga. stranded copper wire
4- patience and the abiltiy to read :D ;)

Anyway, I'm not sure how many horns there are on the R1. Some bikes have two, others have one. First thing you need to do is...establish how many horns are on the bike and then find how many wires go to each one. Usually on multiple horn systems, they are run in series: two wires to one horn, then one wire to the next horn. One horn or two; you ought to have two wires to the first (or primary) horn.

My buddy and I did this exact thing to his older Yammi and it worked great. What you do is look at the wiring running into the primary horn. There should be one wire going into the horn and another mounted external of the horn in order to ground the system. Cut the hot wire (the one running into the horn itself).

Take the end from the horn itself and crimp it into a butt connector. Make sure you crimp it good, but not TOO tight. Now run a jumper (using the wire you purchased) from the power wire feeding the alarm's siren and put that, along with the supply side of the original feedwire to the horn, and crimp them both into the other side of the butt connector.

Taking a feed wire from the siren may require some cutting and splicing as well, but as long as you maintain the original connections, you should be fine. Basically, you're just adding a "jumper" from the power side of the siren to the power side of the primary horn.

That should do ya' just fine. For an extra pro lookin' job, buy some heat shring tubing and slide that over the wire before you make all the connections, then shrink it over top of the butt conectors when finished. It will seal out moisture and ensore corrosion resistance.

Good luck dude, hope this info helps. I can't imagine this bike being radically different from the others I've seen. Lemme know how it goes, and, if the wiring configuration is different, feel free to e-mail me at my personal address and I'll help ya' all I can. My e-mail is in my profile.

Keep me posted my man. Good luck!!! :D :D

P.S. By the way; I'm not sure about your particular system, but you may find that when you are done, hitting the horn button will activate the siren as well as the horns. Depends on the wiring of the alarm system itself. Gorillas are foreign to me, so I can't tell ya' what to expect there. It depends on what they use to switch the system on and off. Lemme know what you find out.

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~Nick
2000 CBR600F4 -
Lost to the Blacktop God. 4,699 miles in under 3 mos. $8,300 worth of damage to my one and only baby. On the brighter side: Can you say 929rr???

[This message has been edited by CBR Brutha (edited August 14, 2000).]
 

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I would think your horn would set off the alarm if you hook them together. You might be better off buying an aftermarket horn (usually louder also) and mounting it next to your existing horn and just wiring it straight to the alarm.

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"If everything's coming your way-
you're in the wrong lane"

Clark
 

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Discussion Starter #4
;)Thank you gentelmen, I'm going out to get my hands dirty now I'll let you know how it goes.

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You actually mount a Gorilla to your bike? How much does it cost to feed that thing? :D :D

I went to Radio Shack and bought a smaller external speaker and just used it instead of the factory alarm speaker.
I prefer to use a disc brake lock for protection. Get the new one with built in siren and that way you do not move the bike with it still attached :eek:

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Todd Hoffmaster
'00 Katana 600
39 speeding tickets and now I have a V1.
So, uh, you "on the take", or what?
 

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Or- for anyone who can't afford a high buck alarm here's something to try....

Go to Radio Shack. Pick up a 12V 100dB mini siren. They carry a couple of different kinds, just get one that is small and is 12V sourced. Next- grab a mercury switch and a small toggle switch. While you're at it, pick up an inline fuse holder, some glass and filament style fuses- the lower the amperage the better- I can't recall for certain, but I think 5 or 10 amp is fine. Make sure you have some 18 ga. copper wire, some butt connectors, nylon zip ties, and perhaps a ring terminal or two. The last supply you need is some adhesive backed Velcro, you can buy packs of it pretty much anywhere. All told, you've maybe spent 30-40 bucks, right?

Now- go out to your bike. Find a good spot to mount the siren. Under the inside of the tail? Basically wherever you think will be good. Use some imagination and try to be stealthy about it. Use the wire ties or the Velcro to secure the siren. Now, mount the toggle switch using the wire ties or Velcro somewhere only you would think to check. Again- use your imagination. Don't make the toggle's location real obvious. Now, get to your battery and wire up the inline fuse holder, toggle, and siren.Leave the + side of the ciruit open for now, as you still have to mount the next part- the mercury switch.

Mounting the mercury switch can be a hassle, but with a little bit of trial and error, you'll get it. What you want to do is mount the switch in such a position that when the bike is on it's side stand, the mercury has run down to one side of the switch, not completing the circuit. When the bike is sat on, or moved slightly off the side stand, the mercury will run to the other side of the switch and complete the circuit.

Once you've got the switch mounted, test the alarm operation by completing the wiring- battery +, inline fuse holder to mercury switch to toggle to siren. Battery - to the - side of the siren. Pretty easy to wire up. (Any double E's out there can correct my electrical theory if I'm wrong.)

What you end up with for your 40 bucks and an hour or so of your time is an alarm that will sound if the bike gets sat on or rocked off the sidestand even the slightest. The toggle switch acts as the arm and disarm method.

I know, I know, it's not as nice as a Gorilla and it doesn't have all the features of the high buck alarms- but maybe somebody will find this of use. Something like this plus a good quality disc lock is a lot better than nothing.

Just thought I'd share...

'cane

P.S. If they really want your bike, they're gonna get it- regardless of how many electrinic gizmos are on it. ;)

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Discussion Starter #7
Hurricane -- I like the idea with the mercury switch. May have to put that to use.
CBR Brutha It didn't go exactly as I had hoped. Here's the deal-previously I had purchased a horn for my FZR and they were only sold in pairs so I had an extra horn lying around. I found a perfect place to mount the horn and ran a ground wire back to the battery and another positive lead back to the alarm.

The alarm is set up with a positive and negative going directly from the battery into the alarms' circut board.Out of the circut board are two very small wires-positive and negative-going into the alarm siren.

I ran the (-) directly to the battery and the (+) to the hot wire of the alarm just to test the horn. It is constant power so the horn is constantly on, the horn works.

Next I spliced the (+) from the horn into the (+) going from the circut board to the siren. when I arm the alarm the siren chirps but there is nothing from the horn.

Next I spliced the (-) lead from the horn into the (-) going from the circut board to the siren. so both the (+) and (-) are coming from the alarm. This time when I armed the alarm nothing came out of the horn, the alarm chirped but I could barely hear it. It was as if there was not enough power output from the alarm to run both. I am wondering if there is a way to wire the horn directly to the battery and use a line from the (+) of the siren to switch it on and off.

or maybe since I have all the wiring done and horn mounted I'll just use Hurricanes idea and have two. Let me Know what y'all think. -----bodean



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Do you really think alarms are worth the bucks? I mean, if someone really wants to steal your bike, it's gone. Way easier than a car. Pick it up throw it in the bed of a truck, drive away and deal with it later if there is an alarm. Right? I'm just guessing.

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John

"Only two things are infinite, the universe and human stupidity, and I'm not sure about the former." -Albert Einstein
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Absolutely! Think about it like this-alarms don't make your bike theft proof by any means. It is additional security, for 100$ you can at least have some noise alerting you to the fact someone is moving or playing with your bike, giving you a chance to respond. If your bike is just chained the perps have all the time they need to work in silence.

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I agree Bodean, it's a friendly reminder to the thief to un-ass my bike before my 12 gauge does it for him.

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"If everything's coming your way-
you're in the wrong lane"

Clark
 

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Hurricane,

That's an excellent post! Great info for a homemade alarm that doesn't cost an arm and a leg. A buddy of mine has an R1, with a really expensive alarm on it that he installed himself. Granted, it has an ignition kill feature, but the darn thing is always going off for no reason. If you try to adjust the sensitivity down just a little, it won't go off at all. The siren is barely noticeable. If you yelled at the same time the siren was going off you wouldn't even hear it. I'm a bit of an "electronic tinkerer" myself. I may just try your "homemade alarm". The Kat is a big bike. Plenty of places to hide a switch. The siren may be a bit of a problem, depending on how big it is. We'll see! Great post!

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Cosmo
"Do you know how fast you were going, son?" "Gee officer, if I guess right, can I go home?"
 
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