Sportbike World banner

1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know I'm not as experienced as I should be to try wheelies(been riding for about 4 months with about 3000 miles ridden), but today I couldn't resist trying to bring the front wheel up. I took the advise from another thread (I think roadstain made it) and tried clutching it up. At first I was kinda scared. I was just pulling the clutch in and reving it up high enough for the bike to lurch forward real quick. After I got comfortable with that I started increasing the rpm's more and more until the front wheel started comming up. I haven't acually ridden a wheelie out yet though. I think I'll just keep practicing bringing the front wheel up for a few weeks to get comfortable. Right now I can get it up about every other try. I still need to learn the correct number of added rpm's to get it up every try. I have a few questions though.

My first question is will I damage my clutch trying to get the front wheel up. Like I said I'll get it up every other try, but the other times the bike just lunges forward real quick and this is what worries me. My second question is how do you guys keep the front wheel up? I think my problem is that I get startled when the front wheel comes up and release the throttle just a little too much causing the front to go down. I know I'm suppose to keep the throttle steady and increase it as needed to keep the front up, but I'm just concerned of flipping the bike completely over if I do this. Thanks for any help :squid:

:edit: forgot to add. everyone from what i've read uses only 2 fingers to pull in the clutch but found that my grip was slipping a bit when the front would jump up. So far I've been sticking to one finger pulling the clutch in. I think this is my fault. I've read somewhere on this forum the front should come up smoothly with no jerking motion. What are some good techniques that you use to insure a smooth whellie?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,151 Posts
Congrats! To ride out a wheelie you need to find the balance point. If you're not sure where or what that is, try doing a search because I'm sure it's been answered many times. Wheelies are a lot of fun.. I do them all the time but I don't ride them out for very far either.. I don't have the money right now to repair my bike when I loop it trying to find the bp. :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,798 Posts
Yep, you are closing the throttle. Happens to everyone. Try just doing what you are doing, not riding them out, untill you are comfortable with how fast the bike comes up. When it doesnt scare you, keeping the throttle open is much easier.
Oh yeah, REMEMBER THE REAR BRAKE. Say "Rear brake" 3 times to your self before bringing it up

Basically, the better you get with the clutch the less revs you will need to bring it up. The higher you bring it up, the less you will have to accelerate to keep it up.

You arent really hurting your clutch. You are putting wear on it, but not like you would be launching it at a drag strip. Even if you wear it out, its just new plates. You are probly huring you chain more than the clutch.

Have fun. Be carefull. REAR BRAKE. And wear your gear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
nobody knows, the trouble ive seen...no body knows such sorrow

i cannot seem to get my telefonica (fackin front heavy like a biatch) to wheelie with yankin the throttle. dont want to try clutching it yet untill i get it up without it first....any tips?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,798 Posts
yeah, stop throttling it. While it is the easiest way to lift the front wheel, its also the least controlled. Learn to clutch, it will allow you to wheelie at lower speeds (which is safer).
I am willing to bet that most of the problem you are facing is body position. Try to sit up, do not lean forward, put as much of your weight to the rear as possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
ooooooohhhhhhhh

well that explains alot. all i hear is "dont clutch it till you can throttle it up first" but knowing now that its harder to control while throttling i will try to learn clutching it instead. thanks for the tip.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,798 Posts
Clutching is harder to master. You gotta play with more controls. However once the wheel is up, clutching provides more control over what happens. Have fun. wear your gear.
dont forget the rear brake.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,798 Posts
Its really a by feel type of a thing. At first you will have to use pretty high revs, but as you get better you will be able to accomplish a wheelie at much lower revs (I have a friend who clutches an R6 at 5k rpm.)
Here is a partial explanation. With the clutch is (not all the way, but slipping) there is very little load on the engine. Thus very little throttle is required to keep the revs up (I try to keep mine around 6k on a liter). As you release the clutch, the load increases, and you have to give more throttle otherwise the engine will bog down. So the trick is to quickly release the clutch, but not so quick that you are dumping it (you still have to maintain control) as you release the clutch, you have to open the throttle pretty wide to keep the revs from dying. It take both hands working together.

Lots of practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
sweet deal

sounds good. i would go out and try it if it hadnt been fuc*ing rainging here so much. there also arent many places to practice around here, seeing how im in ft lauderdale. but ill go out late at night i guess. thanx again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,151 Posts
How heavy is your bike? I think the lowest I ever clutched up my F3 was 5-6k rpms, but I'm not usually that low. Clutching the bike up in second takes considerably more effort though, especially right after you clutch it when the load increases. You gotta really whack the throttle open to keep the front wheel in the air.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,798 Posts
Have fun. If at all possible have a friend attend with a seperate vehicle. Practice is dangerous, and you may need a ride to the hospital. Hopefully not, but its better to be prepared.
You fried could also tell you how high of a wheelie you are riding, becouse it is very difficult to judge from the bike. At first a 6" wheelie will feel like several feet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,798 Posts
Unas_the_Slayer said:
How heavy is your bike? I think the lowest I ever clutched up my F3 was 5-6k rpms, but I'm not usually that low. Clutching the bike up in second takes considerably more effort though, especially right after you clutch it when the load increases. You gotta really whack the throttle open to keep the front wheel in the air.
Yeah, do all your practice in first. There is no need to reach for second gear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,151 Posts
Vash said:
Yeah, do all your practice in first. There is no need to reach for second gear.
Well, actually I'd say second gear could be safer because the front comes up much smoother.. but then there's not as much engine braking as in first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,798 Posts
And he would be going much faster which is bad if something goes wrong. I say, if you cant handle first, you got no buisness messing with second.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,151 Posts
Re: yeah....

WingChunWarrior said:
yeah well my telefonica is 375 lbs i think, so its about 60 lbs more than an r6..(i think??) but its mostly in the front which is the problem.
Pfff.. the dry weight of my F3 is about 405lb. You shouldn't have too much trouble getting that front wheel in the air!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
79 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Guess I'll make a little update. It was raining ALL DAY yesterday:mad: But I got some practice in today. By the end of the day I can now get the front wheel up just about every single time I try. I started by keeping the throttle at 6k in first and raising the revs to about 8-9k and letting out the clutch. Still the farthest I've ridden out a wheelie is abot 5-10feet:eek: Not very far but I've made a lot of improvement I think.

I've started to keep on the throttle a lot more when the wheel comes up. It's still a little scary to me so I'm not rushing anything. Balance point is the point in which the bike feels weightless correct? I've gotten to that point once but it was on accident(scared the shit out of me by the way,lol). I'll be going out again tomorrow and I'm hoping to be able to ride out a wheelie a good distance by the end of the month if all goes as smoothly as it has. Thanks for the advice so far guys.

I almost forgot, can someone tell me how many fingers they use to bring in the clutch? As stated in my first post I've only been using one since the motion of the bike comming up seems to loosen my grip on the handlebars if I use two fingers.

Thanks:squid:
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Top