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so im out riding and messing around with wheelies,tryin ride them out. i pull into some parking lot and looked at my forks and i see some oil on the right leg of the fork.i guess i can call it a leg beats me. from reading posts on here im guessing its a fork seal the blew. i new this was going to happened eventually but damn i wish i didnt, oh well gotta fix it i guess,hope it aint to much
 

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You must be riding some really long wheelies. I have yet to ride a long wheelie myself, but I have over 37,000 miles and have not blown out a fork seal. Is this something I need to be aware of and watch out for if I wheelie my bike? By the way, this is not a flame. I really am curious to know what to look for. Is there a periodic maintance due for the forks if you wheelie?
 

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infamous01 said:
so im out riding and messing around with wheelies,tryin ride them out. i pull into some parking lot and looked at my forks and i see some oil on the right leg of the fork.i guess i can call it a leg beats me. from reading posts on here im guessing its a fork seal the blew. i new this was going to happened eventually but damn i wish i didnt, oh well gotta fix it i guess,hope it aint to much
You know the throttle still works when you`re setting the wheel down right? I don`t post here much anymore, and never posted in this section because its mostly dumb shit, but... I`ve set down my fair share of hard wheelies, from 5-90mph, hell, even on my last get off when the bike DIED on me at 90 and it slammed back down hard enough to throw me off, there wasn`t anything wrong with my fork seals. Either you`re incredibly bad with throttle control (no offence) or Honda put some GARBAGE seals in that bike.
 

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I wheelie all day every day. and the length of you're wheelie has nothing to do with it. It's how you land. More than likely, he's doing pop-a-wheelies. Rippin them up, and either droppin instantly or runnin to redline and slammin it back down. This is what causes the blown fork seal. That along with maybe a bad seal to begin with, excessive wear, dirt, and so on and so forth. But more than likely, it's rediculously hard landings. When doing wheelies, you always want to accellerate a bit as you land. This keeps you from landing hard and also helps with tank slappers.
 

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infamous01 said:
lol,i guess so. is it hard changin them?
changing fork seals requires some special tools, mainly the seal driver. I had considered doing the work myself at first, but the dealer charged only $30 for labor on each leg, plus the seals and the oil, another $15. I will probably eventually get the necessary tools to do it myself, but at the time I was happy to get the bike back to running condition quickly.

Oh, that price was only if I brought the fork legs into the shop. It would have cost more for the labor if I brought in the whole bike. So I've got some experience now on taking the forks off :D
 

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The seal driver is essenitally a piece of pipe with the right od-id that can be hammered on...
 

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Yeah its not the wheelie, its how hard it comes down. Ive done tons of wheelies and never blown a seal, let a friend try my bike, (yeah im an idiot) and he blew mine on first wheelie, he chopped the throttle and just dropped it. Ive also set down alot of hard landing wheelies but never blown as seal. The sign youve blown a seal is when you see oil on your forks. this is dangerous because it will drip down on your front tire an can wash you out!!
 

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Vash said:
The seal driver is essenitally a piece of pipe with the right od-id that can be hammered on...
That's a very good point, Vash. I think the service manual will lull you into believing that only the special tool BZ34C5F will do the trick for a certain procedure, when in fact one can improvise fairly easily. I think that 3 items I did not have turned me off from doing the seals on my own: seal driver, impact wrench, and level measuring tool. Ultimately, I just didn't want to mess up my forks, and since I did not have my service manual at the time, I did not want to guess how much oil to put in, what weight, etc. There are a few web sites out there on how to change fork seals, but they still recommend consulting your service manual for specifics. I must say that since I've been taking off various parts to take to the shop, I've become more emboldened to perform some of the more complex repairs. I am thinking that I definitely need to invest into a torque wrench because I know that one day I will overtighten a bolt and pay tenfold of what a torque wrench costs.
 

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veektor said:
... I am thinking that I definitely need to invest into a torque wrench because I know that one day I will overtighten a bolt and pay tenfold of what a torque wrench costs.
A torque wrench is one of the most frequently used tools I have. It really is worth the up front cost. My advice on it is, get a half-inch drive torque wrench, that way it will handle the biggest jobs as well as the smaller stuff. A 3/8 just won't cut it when it comes time for the bigger stuff like axle nuts, etc.

Anyway, definately worth the cost.:2cents:
 

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Everyone talks about the fork seals but never mentions that hard landings really put a beating on your steering head bearings as well.
 

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Youre right, but when a seal goes it goes, and requires immidiate attention, so people have to deal with it. S H bearings kinda go over time, so it can be procrastinated, making it not such a big issue to alot of people because you can get by with them being worn out, not saying its a good idea, just saying it isnt something that is commonly done. I had my bearings cleaned, repacked and lubed when they did my seals, but coulda used it sooner.
 

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YOure right, but when seals go, they require immediate attention, whereas S H bearings tend to wear out and get sloppy over time, and you tend to adjust to the feeling, because its a slow process, so it gets procrastinated by alot of people. The problems you hear the most about are the ones you cant choose to ignore, atleast thats my theory. I had my bearings repacked and lubed when i had my seals done, but it coulda used it sooner. The right thing to do would be to routinely check them during scheduled maintenance and deal with them as needed.
 
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