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Discussion Starter #1
Well as some of you know already I finally bought my first bike on Tuesday and it has been none stop rain since. I picked up a used 2004 R6 Red/black and I love the thing!
Today I didn't have to work and the streets were dry so I took her out for a little test drive. Being my very first time on a street bike and only the 2nd or 3rd time ever on any motorized bike I went up and down my street and only made it to about 30-35mph, But I enjoyed it so much I can't even explian it.
I practiced on my shifting which was pretty easy and I even learned to flip a u-turn on our small street without putting a foot down(I found 2nd was easier to do this in than jerky first gear-is that normal?)
Anyway I'll be going out a few more times today to enjoy my new bike I just wanted to share the excitment with you guys.

BTW Of course I had all my gear on and didn't try anything stupid.

Safety first:D
 

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sounds fun, im getting my first bike sometime in june!! i cant wait for that exitement. im also looking at an R6 possibly. did you get it new?

good job on the bike and keep having fun riding safe!
 

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First gear will become less jerky as you build your throttle control.

Just a reminder that your horse power will build insainly fast as you hit the powerband, so watchout for that and practice knowing your rpm by sound/vibration alone, don't rely on the tach to tell you that you are getting into the power.
 

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Darn good when you start to get the feel of riding & actually injoying it. With decent weather you can be clocking longer & longer said hours that will mean so much to you especially when it comes to things becomming normal or automatic without having to think of the next move.
 

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:cheers: good for you!

keep it on residential or parkit lot speed until you get the clutch + throttle control down pat. Practice turns. I found that a making a 90 degree turn from a full stop can be pretty challenging first few time. Its good to practice this one cause its a practical skill! Also try shifting to about 4th gear but keep the speed below 40mph then make a stop, dowshifting as you go. Practicing multiple downshifting is a good thing so by the time you start riding in traffic, you wont have to figure it out on the spot. Also wear full gear. You might get temped thinking "i'm only going slow, so I dont think I need my jacket", thats a big no no:D ... I know I did!

also, like what sexieWASD said, pay attention to the bike on how it sounds or feels. You can tell a lot about how youre progressing buy paying attention to these. You have to listen to her:eyebrows:

anyways good luck! be safe!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well here it is...


Aint it beautiful?

Ya I'm going to keep it slow until I feel comfy with stoping fast and I need to practice the take off. I've been just letting the clutch out and it starts going and then I feed it some fuel. I am getting real good at turns I was doing slow figure eights in the culdesac at the end of my street, just getting the feeling of flowing with the bike vs. fighting with it.

I can't wait to get my permit so I can venture further from my house on all the backroads around here.
 

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I can't wait to get my permit so I can venture further from my house on all the backroads around here.
Lemme be the first (likely to be of many) to suggest the MSF course.

--

But I'm drooling in jealousy, tis so pretty!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The MSF course is the first thing I am going to do come summer. I am going to put in a lil time so I don't look like a fool and then take the course when the weather is better.
 

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5dirty said:
The MSF course is the first thing I am going to do come summer. I am going to put in a lil time so I don't look like a fool and then take the course when the weather is better.
Good deal! I'll be taking it myself this coming spring ASAP (have a different job now, so I'll be able to have the time for it finally!!!). Congrats, and it goes without saying, but do take care.
 

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I started riding before I took the MSF, too. Try not to learn any bad habits from the outset since it gets harder to break them later on. Aside from taking courses, getting more and more saddle time and experiencing different things is the best way to learn and to be more proficient. That and reading alot of stuff and trying it out :thumb:
 

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Re: Re: I Did It!!!!!!!

Quote:
Originally posted by 5dirty
...first bike...R6...Safety first



cookeetree said:
At the risk of sounding like I'm bashing you, those three ^ do not go together...

+1 a r6 is no beginers bike be careful and wear gear and take the msf course.
 

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Bike looks good! :) Congrats!

I'm going to sound like a broken record... that's a LOT of first bike. Remember that the bike has a TON more ability than you know right now. Keep it shiny side up! ;)

As for your question about making U-turns in 2nd gear... the MSF actually teaches you to take turns like that in 2nd gear because it is less choppy on a good number of bikes. With time in the saddle, you'll learn tricks and the like for your own bike. Just remember to look WAY beyond where you actually are. It's amazing how things can change from second to second! :eek:
 

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Ya I'm going to keep it slow until I feel comfy with stoping fast and I need to practice the take off. I've been just letting the clutch out and it starts going and then I feed it some fuel. I am getting real good at turns I was doing slow figure eights in the culdesac at the end of my street, just getting the feeling of flowing with the bike vs. fighting with it.


you can practice clutch control by just walking the clutch..... very safe, and easy to pick up on!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I dont take that as bashing, I know you have good intentions are are sick of hearing newbies talk about thier superbikes and all the stunts they can do, before they even learn how to ride it.

Three words I left out are.....
Respect ( for the power of this bike)
Mature ( I'm not a young punk, speed junkie wanting to
feed my need for speed)
and
Cautious (I know what could happen and I'll do what I can to
prevent it)

Thanks for the concern:)
 

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Congrats on the new bike...and welcome to the family! As many have already said, do take that course. They will let you use their bikes and not worry about dumping yours...always better to dump something other than YOUR baby if you are going to do it...and that is the place to dump it if you are going to.

I took an MSF course when I got my motorcycle license when I was 16...it was required. I have remembered almost everything that I learned in that course that I took almost 20 years ago. Now, I am teaching that to my friend who just picked up his first bike...guess what...his first bike is an R6 also.

As far as an R6 being too much bike for a newbie...well, it certainly can be. Avoid the temptation to crack it open...avoid the temptation to try and do "tricks" and just focus on safe riding. Learn what the bike can do, but don't push it past your abilities. Remember, where ever you think your abilities are at right now, realize that they are probably a step lower than what you think.

Happy riding...be safe!! My R6 btw (the yellow50th in front):

 

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Respect ... Mature ... Cautious
Living or dying on a bike is MENTAL.

Surviving while learning a bike is 90% making good mental choices ... buying an R6 as a first bike was a bad choice.

I think your choice of first bike pretty much materially falsifies all the claims you've made here about safety / maturity / respect / yadda yadda. And the "smiley faces" and what I interpret as cracks about "concern for my safety" tell me you aren't very much of any of these.

The combination of factors involved in your decision and some things I will infer from these postings place you well inside the "DEATH BRACKET".

This is the nastier category of things from the Hurt study and Insurance stuff.

This bracket boils down to this ... you have a 5% chance of dying and a roughly 25% chance of injury requiring hospitalization on that bike in your first 10,000 miles <3 years.

Can you learn on an R6? It's possible, LOL ... but it was a very bad choice for a first bike.

There is a lot of cockiness / ego in your posting ... remember ... we do actually want you around, because we like people to ride with ...

... but take it from the other folks ... make better choices from here on out. ;)

First step of making better choices ...

... book your MSF course immediately after reading this posting.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Okay, Packtec I understand that it is very easy to misinterpret posts in a forum there for I won't come back at you too hard.

I know my decision for an R6 is not the best one I've made but many people have done the same and are doing well.

As for thinking there is alot of cockiness in my posts I'd like to know what youre talking about. The smilies and the thanks for the concern for my saftey were sincere and I put the smiley there to show I was not offened be the comments in that post. And that I appreciated the worry.

There is absolutley no ego in ANY of my posts.
I have no idea how to ride yet, my bike is a used bike that has been down a few times already, and the only reason I haven't enrolled into a MSF already is because I have a family to buy X-mas gifts for. I'm taking one step at a time. I have NOTHING to be cocky about.

I am sorry to the rest of the people in this thread for repling in this manner but I am NOT what this guy is impling and don't want to be labeled like that.

So Packtec reply with respect, concern, or even criticism, but do not come at me with this kind of crap again. If you feel the need to start sh!t then head to another forum!!
 

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I agree with Cookie. A 600 ten years ago was one thing. They have gotten pretty serious since the mainstream 750 went away.

And Paktec is stating statistical information gained, that you will hopefully not match.

OK... now that I've come off as an a** to you, good luck on you bike! It sure is pretty. I hope that you learn to run many miles of your choice and see what you want from motorcycling.

Be careful. An 04 R6 can show a serious (very serious) attitude when you run it like it's on a track.

I hope all goes well!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Its all good Dan I'm not mad at you, you're right they are alot more bike than they used to be and Pack is right with his stats, Im sure the death risk is a lot higher when one starts on a more powerful bike.

This bike will not be ran like its on a track probably ever, ...well maybe someday but I can't even imagine being that comfortable and sure of my skills to really get on it. I'll be getting passed by Grandmas in pintos for along time to come I'm sure. I don't even take risks in my cars and I've had a couple pretty fast ones ( I know they were no where near what this bike can do)

Thanks for the compliments on the bike, I'll remember shiney side up at all times.
 
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