Sportbike World banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
any certain way that the passenger should beon your bike? how to turn? accelerate? where they grip ?etc

id really like to know
thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I'm not the authority on this subject, but I'll bump it for you because I remember seeing a link a while back where someone had written up "rules for the passenger" or something like that... I believe the rider was a Goldwing rider, but the rules are all the same.. maybe someone can post up that link, I can't find it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,400 Posts
I have not carried a pillion rider since '50 & if I see pillion footrests on a bike I buy I remove them & put them away for the prospective rider a few yrs down the road.

To many accidents caused due to pillion passengers & to many of the pillion riders being injured far more then the owner/rider. Both have to be very skilled in how to ride in unison & almost be able to read each others minds.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,528 Posts
No passengers on my bike!

Just like Smitty, the first thing I do is remove the passenger pegs. The second step is to put a race-style solo tail on the bike. "Sorry, I can't give you a ride 'cause my bike doesn't have a passenger seat or pegs."

Too many problems, too much potential for injury, too much responsibility...it's just not worth it to me.

However, don't let me (or Smitty) disuade you from riding 2-up. There are a lot of riders on this board that have a lot of experience with hauling passengers and they'll give you the advice you seek.

Good luck! :thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
624 Posts
Just a couple thoughts on this. Make sure your passenger has full gear on - your responsible for her now. Work out a couple of hand signals before taking off - you won't be able to communicate effectively at speed. If you have a side pipe (as opposed to an undertail) remind her to get on and off on the non-pipe side to avoid getting burned. Make sure you are on the brakes and set with both feet planted firmly before she gets on - the bike will want to fall towards her when she mounts. Until both you and your passenger are comfortable (this may take quite a while) don't ride aggressively - tell her to sit nice and quiet back there, no sudden movements or leaning. Also, the bike will handle very differently at slow speeds. Lastly, I find it easier on both of us if I quick shift - that is don't rev the rpms way high before shifting. This smooths things out and avoids the dreaded helmet clunk! Good luck.
 

·
Strength and Honor
Joined
·
6,143 Posts
Bonk, thanks for the pointers. My wife is pining to go for a ride now and then, and I can see us using it to head over to friends' on occassion.

I'm actually surprised at the comments to not do pillion riding, and I'll take them to heart. But first I'll have to see what it's like with a passenger. Thanks to the others for the warnings. Sounds like a great reason to buy a new bike for me and let the wife have the miniceptor! :thumb2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
Riding two up with my wife or either of my kids is great fun, a wonderful bonding experience, and one of the biggest reasons I ride bikes.

You do have a whole lot more responsibility and need to be mellow with a passenger. Gear for the passenger is a given. Be as SMOOTH as you can be and leave more space for stopping than you would alone. Take corners at slower speeds in general but much slower when your passenger is getting used to riding. Passengers tend to fight the bike as it leans over until they are comfortable with riding so be prepared to wallow through lots of turns. Stay away from city streets and don't ride two up during rush hour. I like to ride rural back roads in general but it's a must with a passenger.

Perhaps you'll be as lucky as I am and your wife will want her own bike someday. My wife rides now and both my kids want dirt bikes. My mom is not at all pleased:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,052 Posts
i don't mind carrying passengers at all as long as they know how to ride, and if not, they must follow some simple rules that i have which "generally" teaches them the "rules" of being a passenger.

#1) when entering AND exiting corners, lean with the bike and DON'T SHIFT YOUR BODY.
#2) when riding, pay attention to the road with me so you will be prepared to enter corners, maneuver around obstructions, etc... and DON'T SHIFT YOUR BODY.
#3) if you are feeling uncomfortable, DON'T SHIFT YOUR BODY. tell me and wait until i tell you its ok to move.
#4) if the passenger is a female, they are required to hold onto me at all times with both arms wrapped around me (this one is pretty self explanatory :eyebrows: ).

basically, using the simple rule of DON'T SHIFT YOUR BODY will significantly reduce the amount of movement from the passenger which will allow you to concentrate more on the road and conditions rather than concentrating on compensating for a moving body behind you.

its very stressful when you are fully into a corner and your 120 pound female passenger decides to push herself up off the seat to adjust her butt position.

make sure the passenger is comfortable and ready for you to move PRIOR to putting your bike into gear. this will help prevent them from being tempted to shifting their body.

in short, one rule. DON'T SHIFT YOUR BODY. after that, everything else is all easier to deal with on an individual learning basis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
624 Posts
I agree that riding with a passenger can be fun, it's just a lot different than riding solo. I ride very conservatively with my wife on back - however I learned quickly that being too conservative makes a bike handle sloppily, so until you are both steady ride at the bottom end of your comfort zone, and then build from there.

As an aside, her first experience as a passenger will definitely color her opinion of riding with you. If you do something to set her off, even as a joke (like pop the clutch) that'll ruin everything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
Something I forgot to write earlier.

Don't know why this is but women like to be a little scared now and then... I don't think you should be reckless but once she gets used to riding pillion a bit, take some good corners safely at a good clip now and then. Don't forget that the main reason many of us ride is the adrenaline rush. Don't be an idiot though. A little adrenaline goes a long way and being terrified is not a turn on for most people. What may be normal for you could be pretty damn frightening for a non-biker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
269 Posts
I warn a passenger about the pipe, suggest they follow the rule "keep your spine in line with mine" to keep them from shifting around, and tell 'em to hold on to the rails unless I tap their leg or tap my ribs - both signals to hold on.

When I have a passenger, I don't shift my weight to the inside of a turn, I leave my butt on the seat.

I find I have no difficulty keeping the bike under control at speed with a passenger, even if they are moving around - it's really only a minor annoyance. This may be because my bike (was) physically large, and the passenger seat was low ('87 CBR1000F). I had no difficulty with my KZ900 and KZ1000s taking a passenger, either.

Slow speed operation is slightly more ponderous - and you do brake sooner.

I do take the time to tell the passenger what all the controls are and what I'm doing, how I turn, etc. I also ask before I take the speed over 50, 60, 70, 80, and I ask before I accelerate hard.

My wife and daughters enjoy the back seat in small doses. Next year I will take the oldest to school on the bike a few times (she's 7 now, going on 8 soon).

I hope it turns into "daddy I want a dirtbike'.

cdma2k
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
Next year I will take the oldest to school on the bike a few times (she's 7 now, going on 8 soon).
Did that for my 8 year old daughter last year when I chaperoned a field trip with her. It was a pretty big hit with all the other 8 year olds and she was just beaming.
 

·
Strength and Honor
Joined
·
6,143 Posts
Bonk! said:
I agree that riding with a passenger can be fun, it's just a lot different than riding solo. I ride very conservatively with my wife on back - however I learned quickly that being too conservative makes a bike handle sloppily, so until you are both steady ride at the bottom end of your comfort zone, and then build from there.

As an aside, her first experience as a passenger will definitely color her opinion of riding with you. If you do something to set her off, even as a joke (like pop the clutch) that'll ruin everything.
My wife is M-class licensed. But I suspect I'll be driving if we both go somewhere on it at the same time. So, she's got the understanding of bikes in general, just not much real-world experience.

Thanks for the warnings.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
329 Posts
One thing I didnt notice mentioned that is a big help on a sportbike is to have the passenger wrap there arms around you and then place their hands on the gas tank. This will help them from laying on your back and making it much easier for you to safely pilot your bike. This way they hold themselves up as opposed to you holding up the both of you, and is more comfortable for both people, although this may not be a concern of yours if your bike has a fairly upright riding possition. And like everyone else said make sure they dont move around. I always tell the passenger before getting on that even moving their head from side to side has a dramatic effect on the bike, kind of overemphasize so they get the point. And I personally tell them not to lean but just look and have their head over the shoulder of the direction we are going! And make sure to tell them to ALWAYS hold on tight. NO waving to people, adjusting helmet, clothing, nothing. I like to have a cute girls anlkes up over her head as good as the next man but not when she's rolling of the back of my bike:eek:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,400 Posts
I do not know what type of a m/c the chap rides, that started this thread.

If it is an upright with a dual saddle then good & if it is a HD/Cruiser then even better BUT if it is a sportbike with a dinky little pillion saddle sitting higher then the rider/owner's saddle I look upon this as the wrong set-up for the owner/rider will be leaned forward, hardly anything for her butt & footrests are so high PLUS the rider leaned forward & her taking on all the wind.

Once in a while I see some doll on a sportbike & I think they are standing up on the footrests, but no she is seated on that little patch & way up in the air compared to the rider leaned almost to a croutch position like trying to tuck under the bubble. Still when I see guy & gal riding a HD/Cruiser, if geared properly they fit like a charm.

Sorry if I have repeated myself twice, but you get the hang of what I am trying to say & what are good bikes for pillion riders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I agree with most the comments espiacially DONT MOVE!! my wife thought it would be "more comfortable" if she shifted in the middle of a damn corner at speed!! damn near went into the mountain! make sure you have explained "the rules" and you both are aware of the road conditions otherwise have fun i dont even feel her back there now--o wait she bought her own!! argghhhh!!
;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
231 Posts
Awesome advice from someone responsible

Make sure you and your passenger are wearing as little gear as possible. Encourage him or her (if it's a him, you are now totally gay) to move around at speed. The occasional leg lift by both you and the passender is highly recommended while cornering. Top speed runs through crowded freeway traffic is a great way to impress your passenger. Do not adjust your suspension - you want to do a wheelie, right?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Take note that last guy is from Jersey. 'Nuff said. Anyway, another option for the passenger hand hold is if your jacket has side pockets you can zip open the pockets and they can grasp the back edge of the pocket. This works well for me. Also, since you are on a fairly small/medium size bike, the weight of a passenger is a larger pecentage of the whole lot. I just had a passenger today on my FJR 1300 and it was bitchen. She weighed about 135, so a small percent of the bike and me.Iguess what I'm saying is maybe get a bigger bike for this stuff. Have a good time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
860 Posts
i recently came back from my home town this weekend to show my family the new bike.....i rode my grand ma sister and mother down the long ass street of mine, in my loose gravel driveway and a cement shell shop parking lot......my whole family has been around anything with motors and wheels their whole life so having them as my passengers was not a problem....just tell to stay straight and watch the pipe and lean a little when taking a turn...you are alright......i havent gotten to ride any of my non-family members yet (hot gals) but i think i will in the future
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
wow~ this topic helped me BUNCHES! i now know what to tell my lil godsis when she's ridin with me. (2 chicks on a bike! wOOt!:D) i never really knewwhat to tell her. the "rules" and all that stuff. and did i get this correct.... to wear less gear when riding with a passenger?! im def gonna print all this info out and read up on it a few times to get it stickin in my head. oh! what kind of helmet is good? should i get a fullface helmet like mine or would anything do or what? oh!when takign turns (especially right turns) should the passenger sorta stick out his/her knees too or no?

thanks you guys.... cheers!
-jadie
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top