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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
how to convince the parents?

What up, Im a freshman in college, who in HS saved up enough money to buy a bike. Im trying to get a Ninja 500 or maybe a bandit or seca if I cant find a 500. Problem is my parents hate the idea of me getting a bike cause they think I will kill myself. Im going about this in all the right ways, Ive signed up for the MSF in May (which they tell me to cancle, asap). Plan on getting the gear and all that jazz.

I tried to tell them all the staticis and that bikes arn't that bad and they get a negative sterotype. They still refuse the idea, and Im running out of ways to convice them. And I have a cage btw, no ticketts or accidents so far. I do live in heavy traffic area, Northern VA. Heavy during rush hr, not too bad through out day.

Any help or ideas would be good.
 

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I have one question: do you still live with your parents? If you dont I cant understand why you dont get one, theyll get over it shortly.

If you do still live with your parents just try to explain how fuel efficient bikes are, how cheap insurance is on them, how you will drive with awarness, etc. Also how angry will they be if you just buy one and show up to your house with it, will they just live with it? Or you could do what I did and buy a bike 1 month after I moved out!:)

A note to all parents....do not tell your kid "as soon as you move out you can get yourself a bike, until then you cant get one" because they will, as soon as they move out!:thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I live w/them. I'm only 18 and don't plan on moving until I graduate around 21ish. Umm I told them what if I bring onehome and they said they would stop helping me for college...

They also implied after I move out I can get one, but that is many years away.
 

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I would try to ease them into the whole concept of you getting a motorcycle. First of all I would take them with you to a MSF class. Hell, sign them up with you and they just might decide to buy a bike themselves.

If they can get past the perception that bikes=bad, then the rest of the process will be easier. Since they are helping you through college a confrontation/conflict is not in your best interest.
 

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What about trying the approach that after you do graduate and move out youre going to get a bike any way, so you should get as much practice in as you can? Far shot I know, but worth the try!
 

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It took me 3 years to convince my parents. I started off saying let me "just take the MSF course, I mean who knows I may not even like riding" (I also worked on the more leaniant of the two first) After the MSF course I told them I would pay for EVERYTHING bike, insurance, gas the whole bit. It took a while but they eventually gave in. It wasn't an easy process, I just took my time and they finally went for it. I also did the "If I cant get one now, Ill just get one as soon as I move out." and that helped a bit too (they dont want to hire a house sitter for the animals when they go outta town) You can also try bringing them down to the MSF place and have them talk with the instructors their. They are, usually, nice and good at convincing people. Good luck with it, and dont give up. Keep up the pressure, they will crack.

Sepias
 

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Heh, I've wanted a motorcycle since I was young. I never had a car in High School, so when I got to college, I got my first car and hated it. So the first year of college I saved up enough money to get a bike and told my parents that I would get one with or without their permission (I was 19 at the time). Instead of being shut out, they decided to support me minus the money. It took about 6 months for them to come around and do that as most parents will threaten you till you give up, but I didn't give up.

So in may 2005, I got my first bike, a honda 1994 cbr600 f2. I still love it till this very day. It hasn't been a year yet and I've already aquired 3 bikes and love every minute of riding, rain or dry, cold or hot. It beats being a cager and much cheaper then having a car.
 

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Waiting until you are supporting yourself is not a big deal. I didn't start riding until I was 22 when I bought a bike as a college graduation present to myself. The bottom line is that if they support you financially then you need to respect their rules. Once you're on your own, do what you want. :2cents:
 

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Or you could always call their bluff... would they really want their kid growing up without a college education?



Whatever you end up doing, dont listen to me...
 

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Get to the heart of the matter with them... most people who are anit-bike will tell you the story of someone they knew (way back when) who did somthing (usually stupid) and wound up dead (or in the emergency room)...

Listen, and then get the facts (or, better yet, look at accident reports, etc. first)... remind them that you are a responsible young person (hopefully correct...) and that you are looking for cheap, reliable transportation that just happens to be fun as well. The idea of taking them to class with you (if at all possible...) is a good one too. Tell them you are looking to invest in good safety gear, a good bike, and will ride with people with more experience as much as possible to become a better rider (not to mention it's a good excuse to go on long cruzes on the weekends..."sorry mom, gotta run... motorcycle practice...")

If you get to directly address their concerns with the facts, most of the time they will (reluctently) relent, and let you get the first bike. then it's up to you not to F' it up.

P.S... 19 years, and several hundred thousand miles later, I managed to survive... just remember... rubber side down.:D
 

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And remember, do preventive maintence. Its much more important on 2 wheels then 4. I almost found that the hard way when my rear axel almost fell out!
That woulda been a site to see. You kill anything on your bike with that trick?

Sepias
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Heres my update:

-They say they wont goto the MSF class.
-The whole idea of it being cheap trasnporation isnt working.

What I have left is to thell them "Im going to get one as soon as I move out, so why not now" and I might call their bluff on stopping my college help, If I bring one home.

The only good thing I can see out of this is the longer I wait the more money I can save up so that I can get a better starter bike (and better/more gear). Like a SV 650 or a newer bandit.
 

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Quentin said:

The only good thing I can see out of this is the longer I wait the more money I can save up so that I can get a better starter bike (and better/more gear). Like a SV 650 or a newer bandit.
+1 on the better gear but dont invest much on a first bike. You will hurt it and you may wreck it... several times. Save the cash for the second bike. I wouldn't try bringing one home... while that may work, its not worth the risk. My parents would have thrown me out on my ass if I did that, and probobly given me a bill for all the money they have spent on me as well. Just take your time and keep pressing the fact that you want a bike, just dont press to hard or to often. Go ahead and take the MSF class. Its a great place to start and it shows your commited to your parents even though they are still anti bike.

Good luck,
Sepias
 

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Man, I am glad that I didn't have to deal with that when I was still at home. Dad took me to get my first bike when I was only 15. Rode that first year along side him with a learners permit, the whole 50 meter rule. Put about 4500 miles on it that year.

In your case I wouldn't just bring one home. You have more to loose than gain. Just keep pressing at the right times and lay all the facts out on the table. Whatever you do, don't try to sugar coat it. Just explain to them that you are getting all the gear you need and a great starter bike. Maybe see if they would go for you getting a cruiser, and give them the safer and easier to ride thing. Atleast you would still be on two wheels.

Whatever you do don't give up!!! Just know when to take a break.
 

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You are in a losing battle. Your parents obviously care about you and don't want anything to happen to you. Motorcycles are dangerous period. You could be the best rider in the world, but that doesn't stop some 80 year old from pulling out in front of you. I would never let my son get a bike while he is living at home(if I had one). Three weeks ago a 15 year old died in our small community on a sport bike. 15! Who in their right mind would let a 15 year old have a rocket? My parents wouldn't let me have one either, and I am glad they didn't. I would surely be dead by now if I had one in high school.
 

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good luck and keep on trying, seems like you got the right idea about a starter bike and gear, hopefully your parents will see that later on. win the small fights, convince them that its ok for you to take the MSF course, just as a way to try it out, and tell them its a good way to learn to ride, in case you may need to down the line, like an emergency situation or something

i also don't think you should bring a bike home, just isn't worth the risk. arguing that you will buy a bike when you move out anyway is a little tricky so don't come off sounding childish when you say it. Tell them it would be good to get a few years of riding experience earlier on, tell them that if you are gonna get it anyway, they may as well see how safe you are on a bike and that way when you do move out, its one less thing they have to worry about. :2cents:

I moved out before I got my bike, my mom didn't even know I was interested until after I took the MSF course and bought myself one. I eased the shock to her by saying it was something new I wanted to learn and could just be a "phase" :D
 

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Most of the people on here have some pretty good advice. I can tell you when I first wanted to get a bike NO one was happy about it. Every single person in my family absolutly hated the idea.

I went from that to having a bike in about 2 weeks. The key for me was just being honest, sincere, and most importantly, very serious about the decision.

The first thing that comes to any parents mind when they hear the word "Motorcycle" is that their baby is going to end up in the hospital or worse. Natural parenting instinct is to try to discourage you. Quite frankly, they'll probably hate the idea of you on a bike LONG after you already have one. You'll have to prove you can handle it before parents can sort of accept it, but they don't want you to learn so its very difficult for most to convince parents to let them get one.

You'll need a few things...

Facts, every single big of useful information you can get your hands on get it. You have to be fair about it too, you can't put bikes up on a pedistal because they will see through that crap right away. Saying "no bike accidents in forever in this city" just won't cut it.

Also, your parents know a lot about you (like it or not). Are you a crazy driver? do you take a lot of risks? They'll translate that into you = maniac on a bike and possibly dead. If thats how they look at you, you'll have to change the way they look at you and that could take time.

Get your parents 2 cents. Ask them why they think its a bad idea for you to get a bike. The day you can go to them and they can't say something you can't respond to your on the right track.

Lastly they have to know your serious about a bike. If you are that serious about getting a bike then they should know it. Tell then straight up how badly you want a bike, and why. Get your gear, take the class. Basically, be ready in every single aspect (except of course) having the bike. You can justify all that easily by letting them know that sooner or later you DO plan on getting a bike, and when you do get one you want to be as ready as possible.

Good luck.
 
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