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Discussion Starter #1
I've been trying to get the front end of my Ninja ZX6R off the ground just a couple inches, but can't seem to do so.
I don't know if I'm just not holding back the throttle enough or what?

For a 600cc sport bike like mine, If I'm in 1st gear, approximately how hard do I need to throw back my throttle and about how many RPMS should I be at to expect my front end to lift a few inches, but not flip my bike?
 

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All the way open at 12k+ RPM. Make sure you sit far back, with your back streight. You are most likely leaning forward over the bars, instinctivly, keeping the front end down.

And dont forget to cover the rear brake!
 

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Do let us know what damages & costs you had to come up with for you accidently flipped the bike onto its backside------obviously a bit to much power.LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Seriously, I have a Ninja ZX6-R, this bike should be able to do a wheelie under it's own power. Right? But I'm really hitting the throttle on it from all gears and nothing is happening except for the bike going really fast.

What am I doing wrong?

Is the clutch involved? Do I need close and open the throttle quickly?
 

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What year is your bike? I had a '92 CBR600 that would power up in 1st, and just about any 600 from the last 15 years should be able to do it. I am inclined to believe that it is your body positioning (as Vash hinted) that is keeping the bike from coming up. If you get rolling and get the revs up to where it's making power (usually on the high side of 7K rpms or thereabout) and close the throttle briefly and then crack it back open all the way, the front should come up. But if you're sitting forward and locking your arms, you will have a very hard time doing it.

That being said, if you are on here asking how, that is a very strong indicator that you do not know enough about your bike, or riding in general, to be doing stunts yet. So I would say get another season or two under your belt and learn what your bike is capable of doing on 2 wheels before you set off on just 1.
 

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That being said, if you are on here asking how, that is a very strong indicator that you do not know enough about your bike, or riding in general, to be doing stunts yet. So I would say get another season or two under your belt and learn what your bike is capable of doing on 2 wheels before you set off on just 1.


+1!!!
Red I ride a 2007 ZX6R, if your bike is a late model, it definitely has more than enough power to get that front wheel up. I would tell you to take your time, meld with the bike, really get to know it, then everything else will come. You've got plenty of blacktop to tear up on one wheel. Just my :2cents:, Either way, keep us posted on how it goes bro.

Keep the shiny side up
 

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One thing that I haven't done yet, but will soon once I have the time, the drag strip!!!

Everyone should reccomend others (that want to wheelie) to go the to drag strip, to realy learn your bike's pure acceleration and wheelie tipping-point, take it to the drag:thumbs2:

:2cents:
 

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One thing that I haven't done yet, but will soon once I have the time, the drag strip!!!

Everyone should reccomend others (that want to wheelie) to go the to drag strip, to realy learn your bike's pure acceleration and wheelie tipping-point, take it to the drag:thumbs2:

:2cents:
+1
The only thing better than looping your bike, is looping it in front of a couple hundred spectators. At least they have emergency crews standing by.
 

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+1
The only thing better than looping your bike, is looping it in front of a couple hundred spectators. At least they have emergency crews standing by.
A ninja 250 can wheelie easy, it is a matter of controlling the power once you reach balance point. I stunt my CRF50 my 10 year old can wheelie that. Using the clutch, and a bounce like others have been talking about is the easiest way, don't do this if you aren't ready to apply a counter force, rear brake. I do wheelies on my 600, I'm not all that sure of my self yet, I got a tail scrape once, I'm not an expert by any means. Check out this video of me when I just got the bike I'm riding now, none of the wheelies are long, I was easing into it. I'll go big this year. Punch the link.
http://www.metacafe.com/watch/896236/early_07_stuntin/
 

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My 04 R6 pops up in first at about 8.5-9ish with a lil extra throttle, even when I'm laying on the tank. It kinda scared me the first time as I was only planning on going fast but the I felt it lifting me up (awesome feeling) the steering goes soft and the engine is screamin'. Somehow I managed to calmly pull the clutch and shift into second and take off like a rocket very smoothly even though it was done accidently. I only wish someone had seen it. Since then I have done it a few more times but try not as I only have about 400 miles under my belt and I dont wanna wreck.
Good luck with your wheelies and remember do it on the strip (or an empty parking lot) not the street and ALWAYS wear your gear.
Ride safe guys!
 

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your problem is your trying to "power" wheelie. not a good and consistent way to learn. you cant power wheelie every bike....but you can most certainly clutch up every bike. Slip the clutch to wheelie and you will progress a lot faster.:2cents: :thumbs2:

There are a couple different methods for clutching wheelies. I prefer the second method.
Method 1: First accelerate with the clutch engaged. Then, with the throttle still opened, pull in the clutch with one finger, to the point where the clutch disengages. With the engine still under throttle, quickly let the clutch back out as the tach is rising.
Method 2: Close the throttle, and then pull the clutch in all the way, with one finger. Then twist the throttle and dump the clutch.
When learning to clutch, only rev up the engine a little bit at first before letting out the clutch. This will give you the feel for clutching. Then gradually increase the rpm’s before dumping the clutch, until the front end jumps up close to the balance point. Reduce the throttle as the front end comes up to the balance point. If it comes up too far, gently push the rear brake to bring the bike back forward.


^^^thats all you need to know right there:cheers:
 

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+1
The only thing better than looping your bike, is looping it in front of a couple hundred spectators. At least they have emergency crews standing by.
You forgot the photo's of your smashed mug & bike hitting the web later that night... :laughing:
 

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4:10 & 5:00 : shows just how to slip the clutch.

I've been trying to wheelie, not too hard just here and there. When I tried to 'slip the clutch', I was basically pulling the clutch in all the way and dumping it, thinking I was slipping it, with no luck. This clip shows the finess and the just on how to start
 
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