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Generally 600 for first change on a new bike, then every 3-4 k, after that...I personally stick closer to the 3 side...but thas just me...:cool: Dont forget about the filter as well...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks

well... it certainly isn't a new bike.:) It has 20k mi., so i guess in the next 1k i will be changing the oil and filter. what oil and oil filter brand and weight? I am partial to mobile 1 10W-30, but i don't care, cause what works for cars is prolly different for bikes.
 

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I use the honda oil filter in mine, but I use Mobile1 pure synthetic 10w-40. Sometimes I move up to 15w-50 during the summer.
 

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Try this filter on for size....



and the info from www.scottsonline.com

Oil Filters (Road Bikes): Superior Filtration:
This should be the last oil filter you will ever buy! Made from laser cut, medical grade, 304 stainless steel micronic filter cloth, this filter provides 200% more filter area in many cases. Most good paper filters will pass particles in the 90 to 95 micron range, some will pass particles in the 300 micron range! A human hair is about 40 microns, a white blood cell is approximately 25 microns. Our stainless filter catches items down to 35 microns "absolute", which is about 3 times better than most paper or brass filters. The pleat seam is welded, able to withstand up to 600 degrees in our filter, not glued, like paper filters.

Cleanable and reusable:
Simply remove the filter, rinse in clean solvent and replace it, you're done. The filter can be cleaned with solvent, kerosene, aerosol carburetor cleaner, or any other degreasing agent, even common dish soap. You can even blow air through the filter from the inside out to remove any small particles or cleaning agent from the screen if you so desire.

Consistent flow under all conditions:
Stainless steel will stand up to the stress of heat, high pressure and physical handling much better than paper or brass. This filter maintains consistent flow under all conditions including cold start ups and or under extreme heat. A one inch square of this micron filter material will flow 1.9 gallons of 90 weight oil per minute at only 1 psi pump pressure (70 degrees F). Our typical filter size is 30 sq. in. which equals the flow of 57 gallons per minute. Standard paper filters do not flow well when the oil is cold, often causing the bypass valve to open allowing unfiltered oil to enter your engine, uhg!

Unaffected by Water, Heat and Pressure:
This filter is capable of withstanding extremely high pressure and flow rates. It is also unaffected by Water, Heat and Pressure, unlike standard paper filter material which swells in the presence of water, closing off filter pores and reducing flow.

Early Detection:
By allowing you to inspect the debris that is in the filter you can monitor your engines condition, avoiding minor and or catastrophic failures.

What is a Micron?
A micron is one thousandth of a millimeter. That's about .00003937 inches. Fine sand can be as small as 62 microns thick. Our filter will not allow any particle over 35 microns to pass through this filter, that's some pretty small stuff that's being caught.

So who uses this type of filtration?
This high tech filter technology is widely used in all types of auto racing including NASCAR, Indy type cars, Formula 1 and in the Aerospace industry where filtration is of the utmost importance.

Things to think about:
Next time you are fanning your clutch think about all that tiny debris that is created from the clutch and gears meshing together, spinning around in your motor's vital parts. If you really care about the life of your motor and consider the cost of loss of time associated with a current day 4-stroke motor, then you need one of these filters. It's even transferrable in some cases to you next bike. I used the same filter in my last three bikes, and it's still like brand new, there's simply nothing to wear out.



I use that and all Redline oils for my bike.
 

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You can never change your oil or filter too often. On hard long rides where I am running at sustained high temps I change the oil every 2000. Occasionally I have run hard and overheated the engine a few times on a trip and have changed it sooner. My engine is 25 years old with 50K on it.

Our seasons are short in the sub arctic
 

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Javahed,,

I think saying never too much may be questionable..I hear what your saying but depending how and where you ride your bike,,,too often could be overkill & waste of $$....
 

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Uh, rida, you may want to reread the preceding posts and then what you wrote. A little tired, are ya? That filter looks the bomb Im going to do a little research, Im thinking of buying it.
 

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I think Rida has Sailor and me mixed up ;)

I have the scotts filter on my bike and my wife's bike. The peace of mind is worth the $$ alone. Super filter - great "quality" feel about it - oh so happy :D

Have fun!

Dan
 

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Nick,

I don't know.

It's such a low pressure operation systen with such a large filter area, I don't think a bypass would be needed unless something clogged the entire filter - and then I think your bike would be DOA.

Sounds like a good question to fire off to Scotts.

Have fun!

Dan
 

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Nik,

Just for the record, i said between 3-4k, but generally stick closer to the 3 side....But thought every 2 thousand could possibly be overkill, especially if your running synthetic, you dont need to change as frequent.....

Anyway as long as your taking care of your bike bike and changing it period thats the important issue....& yes i am tired was up @ 4:30 am for work & didnt get home until 5:30pm...So a cold one, shower and an early night to the sack.......Be safe out there yall.....





Expect it when you least expect it........:eek:
 

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Methinks you folks are changin' oil waaaay too often!

A lot of the articles below seem to verify what I've dug up over the years on oil, etc. 'Course, realizing trying to change someone's mind 'bout their beliefs regarding oil (however irrational) is an exercise in futility, read at your own risk!

Some interesting reading:
http://www.yft.org/tex_vfr/tech/oil.htm
Motorcycle Oils (Author is a chemist, retired from a major Oil and Chemical Company, after a career in the Quality Assurance of Fuels, Lubricants, and Chemical products.
http://www.nightrider.com/biketech/oiltest1.htm
This article is from the February, 1994 Motorcycle Consumer News in the article "Motorcycle Oils vs. Automotive Oils".
http://www.twocreeks.net/toby/oil_filters.shtml
Motorcycle Oil Filters Exposed!
http://ntpog.server101.com/reviews/...s/filters.shtml
North Texas Prelude Owners Group Filter Review (autos)
 

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Rida I was taking a jab at you because you attributed sailors comment to Javahed. I also get up early for work. 3:40 AM on every work day and I return home at 6PM. Throw in one teething infant and without coffee I would have died a long time ago!

Javahed Im not concerned about the filter getting clogged up because I wouldnt let it go that long without changing it. What I was curious about was I read that there is a valve inside the Honda OEM oil filter that needs a little pressure to open, so that on start up the oil galleries fill first, then once pressure has risen, the oil filter opens to allow flow. Its at the end of the filter opposite the opening. In this way it lessens the low oil pressure time at start up. I was always under the impression that the valve that opens to bypass the filter if it gets clogged was built into the engine, not the filter. Thats the way it is on my 1964 Buick. There is a spring you can select when rebuilding the engine that sets the maximum oil pressure before bypass. Anyone know more about this? Do bikes have this feature too?
 

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Oil change intervals

Well I'm a truck mechanic. So I see what engines look like that get run past their oil change intervals, not a pretty picture. I change oil in my XX between 1500 and 2000 miles whether it needs it or not. Too often? Maybe, but how expensive is a new engine? Hey my scoot only takes 4 quarts of oil and a filter, not expensive to my way of thinking. Now if I were running a synthetic in it I would stretch the interval some. My bike is new and I'm letting it break in. In my opinion synthetics are not the oil to break in a new motor on.

I use Castrol 10-30W GTX with a plain old garden variety Wix filter. I do like the looks of this new filter that someone posted here. Dast I ask how muchee? Looks expensive but good stuff usually is.

Silverbird. :cool:
 

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On my old 95 F3, I would change the oil (semi-synthetic) every 2-3k, along with the plugs. The semi-synth worked so much better than dino oil, and the bike ran better with new plugs in there. Besides, changing the plugs is so easy on those bikes - why not? :D
 

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scotts filter

i'm with nick
this is the bomb and i'm buying in.
it does not need a bypass valve because this filter does not act like a paper filter i.e 1.9 gal of 90w permin at 70f a paperfilter would never do that. and if you have a service manual for your bike i'm sure it has more than 1 high pressure blow valve on the oil system...check it out
 
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