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Discussion Starter #1
Do you let your bike idle for a few minutes and how long do you ride before you get your revs up high?

Will the bike get faster on the right temp if you let it idle? ('cause there is no air flow)

My problem is I have to do a temp mod and at the moment I dont get the right temp value of my bike.
 

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I let my bike idle at 1k until the temp gauge moves. Then I ride off without working the engine very hard until it is fully warm.

Not quite sure what you mean about the engine going faster, but if you're asking if the rpms will increase with the choke on as the engine warms, then the answer is yes - but you shouldn't allow it to rev very fast until it is warm....I don't think that letting it rev fast will harm the engine, but I'd prefer to let the head heat slowly & evenly.....

What sort of temp mod?
 

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All really depends on the weather conditions. Here in Texas it doesnt take long at all for the bike to warm up. I start it, open the garage door back it out then close the garage door and by then it is usually ready to go.

My bike has carbs and as long as the throttle is responding smoothly I consider it good to go. I will usually ride a mile or two though before I really get on it.
 

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I like for my bike to reach 130 before I get it out of the parking lot. It takes the time to put on helmet and gloves, plus a slow ride thru the parking lot itself. I wait till the temp gage starts to register (104F) and then ride it with the clutch pulled in, giving it enough gas to raise the revs to around 2k or so.
 

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For my old cbr, I just put full choke on when I start it up then put my gear on (about 1-2 mins). By the time I get on and drive about a 1/2 mile, carbs are warm, gas isn't being spewed through the exhaust, and throttle response is good.
 

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my temp first registers at 96 degrees i usually wait to get on at about that temp at least. then once i get to where i can open it up its usually good to go.
 

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My '98 GSX-R 750 is the first bike I have owned that had a digital temp gauge. I never thought a bike warmed up so fast. Of course mine is kept in a garage where it is 70.

I pull the (fake) choke and start the bike. By the time I have put my helmet and gloves on my bike is reading 110.

And I am off...

I am always easy on it untill I have warmed up the tires anyway so I never really run it untill about 160 degrees or so. I learned that the hard way the first time I tried to clutch up a wheelie in second gear as soon as I pulled out of my driveway. The back tire cut loose just as all of the weight had transfered to the back. Very scary.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Rundog said:
What sort of temp mod?
The 97 TLS thermostat was put in the housing near the radiator so the bike temp that is displayed on the digital clock is always colder than it really is and thus the ECU get the wrong signal and is always on a cold mapping wich run rich.

The mod I have to do is to get another thermostat housing and mount it where the 98+ TLS's thermostats are.
 

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Hendog24 said:
I learned that the hard way the first time I tried to clutch up a wheelie in second gear as soon as I pulled out of my driveway. The back tire cut loose just as all of the weight had transfered to the back. Very scary.
When ever I want to pop wheelies before my tire gets to proper temps, I just do a burn out. But atlast, I need a new tire. Oh wells, 6000 miles isn't that bad for a rear tire.
 

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Ya, I got 5k on my rear now, so if its not nice and warm whenever I clutch up a wheelie it spins and fishtails a bit. I actually find it a bit fun and its a good way to get use to having your rear end get loose.

What is really fun is when its spinning and the front still comes up a bit.
 

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if you ride a modern liquid cooled motorcycle, you only need to let it run long enough to get the oil circulating, and off you go.

If it's a anceient design like the air cooled motors in HD and Buell, you should let the bike warm up good before you ride, Harley Davidson motors are so tall, (long stroke) that the top of the motor can heat up too fast and cause oil leaks, so it's best to let them get nice and warm, it probably isn't as much of an issue with the new twin cam motor or the new motors that are used in Buell's and the Harley sporsters, but it's best to let the things get warm. :2cents:
 

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I for one strongly disagree with that. As most of you know, most of the damage done to an engine over its life time comes from a cold start, when the engine isnt yet lubricated. However it just has to happen and there is nothing we can do about it.
If you look at the remainder of the damage, most of it occurs from running hard before reaching its optimum temperature. Cold engine has a smaller oil gap in the bearings, so oil has a harder time lubricating. In addition cold oil has higher visoucity, so it has and even harder time lubricating.
The gap between the piston and cylinder walls on the other hand should increase, this exposes a larger part of the rings, thus creating a higher torsional load on them, and as they twist, the edge of the ring gets rounded, weakening the seal provided even after the engine warms up.

I think the engineers at honda agree with me. Look at the new VFR, and you will see that the engine is governet from reaching its peak rpm (or maybe the Vtech doesnt kick in, dont remember) untill the engine reaches 150 degrees. With the tight profit margins in the motorcycle industry, they would not have added this feature unless they thought it was worth it.
 

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Vash said:
I for one strongly disagree with that. As most of you know, most of the damage done to an engine over its life time comes from a cold start, when the engine isnt yet lubricated. However it just has to happen and there is nothing we can do about it.
If you look at the remainder of the damage, most of it occurs from running hard before reaching its optimum temperature. Cold engine has a smaller oil gap in the bearings, so oil has a harder time lubricating. In addition cold oil has higher visoucity, so it has and even harder time lubricating.
The gap between the piston and cylinder walls on the other hand should increase, this exposes a larger part of the rings, thus creating a higher torsional load on them, and as they twist, the edge of the ring gets rounded, weakening the seal provided even after the engine warms up.

it's good that you disagree, and it's okay, but I didn't say anything about running hard cold, I said it's okay to ride after the oil cerculates --on a modern liquid cooled motor-- I typically start towords the freeway within one minute of starting my bike. I don't rev the motor beyond 4000 rmp until the motor is good and warm and it warms up(130 or so) before I get two the end of the alley behind my house (about 300 feet) modern motorcycles are great.

I do agree that it is a very bad idea to warm the motor up by revving the hell out of it (i've seen people do this) it's also not wise to heat you back tire by doing a burn out (unless all you do is drag race) --just my opinion:2cents: :)
 

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JBaz said:
When ever I want to pop wheelies before my tire gets to proper temps, I just do a burn out. But atlast, I need a new tire. Oh wells, 6000 miles isn't that bad for a rear tire.
you got 6000 miles on your rear tire, thats really increadible, I havent goten more than 3000 miles on any of my rear tires since I got the z1000 in 03 I'm on my third rear and my second front in 8000 miles (I don't intentionally pop wheelies, I do notice a bit of wheel spin in the apex and exit of some turns when I'm riding at a brisk pace):D
 

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Fatman said:
it's good that you disagree, and it's okay, but I didn't say anything about running hard cold, I said it's okay to ride after the oil cerculates --on a modern liquid cooled motor-- I typically start towords the freeway within one minute of starting my bike. I don't rev the motor beyond 4000 rmp until the motor is good and warm and it warms up(130 or so) before I get two the end of the alley behind my house (about 300 feet) modern motorcycles are great.

I do agree that it is a very bad idea to warm the motor up by revving the hell out of it (i've seen people do this) it's also not wise to heat you back tire by doing a burn out (unless all you do is drag race) --just my opinion:2cents: :)
In that case, we're in agreement. There is nothing wrong with letting your motor warm up as you are cruising slowly. Once the engine hits 100-110 deg, I too make a slow turn thru the parking lots, letting it come up another 20-30deg before getting on the street.
Perhaps it is the difference in bikes, or maybe riding styles, but my engine rarely sees the low side of 4krpm with the kickstand up. I thought you meant that its ok to nail the crap out of the engine once the oil starts circulating...
 

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my bike stays on the low side of 5000 rpm until I get into the hills near my house and then the first three gears (5000 rpm to red line) is all I need for a nice ride.
 

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Fatman said:
my bike stays on the low side of 5000 rpm until I get into the hills near my house and then the first three gears (5000 rpm to red line) is all I need for a nice ride.
When commuting around town, mine stays in first gear. 5th and 6th are only used on highways, the local backroads (which are full of fast sweepers, there isnt any tight stuff here) are done in 3rd and 4th, with the 5th handling straight aways. The track I visit can be done almost entirely in second gear, with the red line being bumped only once at the end of a streight.
 

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Vash said:
When commuting around town, mine stays in first gear. 5th and 6th are only used on highways, the local backroads (which are full of fast sweepers, there isnt any tight stuff here) are done in 3rd and 4th, with the 5th handling straight aways. The track I visit can be done almost entirely in second gear, with the red line being bumped only once at the end of a streight.
some of the roads are so tight here that I kinda wish I had a supermotard.:D
 

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mine ... I start up... let it run while gettin gear on and when the auto choke cuts off and idle comes down to 1500 ...I'm off.... :cool:

E.
I dont' beat the piss out of mine though... ;)
 

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Man, the roads in raleigh suck. Not that many nice curvy roads, and if they are, they end up having potholes in the apex of the turn. I'd have to drive atleast a good 30+ mins to find some nice country roads, but the last time I did that, I hit a deer.
 
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