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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys and gals! We've got a local track day coming up in about a month. The location is Putnam and our local Suzuki dealer is sponsering the event. Most of my buds are riding on the track and trailering their bikes to the track. I am trying to talk some of the guys who aren't going to be able to get on the track, for various reasons, to do a group ride up to the track just as a fun thing to do. I've heard comments like "4 hours is too far to ride" and "geez that is a long way on a sportbike". My question to those of you reading this post...."How far is too far to ride your sportbike?" Given nice sunny weather and relatively warm temps.........I think it sounds like fun......what do you think?
 

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I agree with you. I think it would depend alot on the type of rider and the type of bike they're on. If they just are'nt into long distances, they wont have fun and if they ride a 'stupidly' uncomfortable bike (like a Ducati) then its not going to be fun either.

But the short answer to your question is:

'If the bike breaks and leaves you stranded... you rode it too far' :D

P.S. Im gonna move this to Sport Touring...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Cool! Yeah...I guess pushing would totally suck! Oh yeah...I guess I also need to learn how to post my threads under the right forum topic! Oopps!;)

So.......Matt.....how far is too far?
 

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As soon as you are in agony you know it's "too far."

Seriously, it depends on the rider and their threshold. I've ridden my Busa for 9 hours straight with only a few rests (gas and lunch) and felt fine the next day. 4 hours should be a cake walk tho for most bikes and riders.
 

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I wouldn't think 4 hours would be too much. The most I've done is 10 hours (600 miles) in one day, and that was on an F3. Granted I could barely squeeze the clutch in the end, and I didn't feel like riding for a week after it, but it was a nice day and we had a blast.
 

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endleswavz said:
Hey guys and gals! We've got a local track day coming up in about a month. The location is Putnam and our local Suzuki dealer is sponsering the event. Most of my buds are riding on the track and trailering their bikes to the track. I am trying to talk some of the guys who aren't going to be able to get on the track, for various reasons, to do a group ride up to the track just as a fun thing to do. I've heard comments like "4 hours is too far to ride" and "geez that is a long way on a sportbike". My question to those of you reading this post...."How far is too far to ride your sportbike?" Given nice sunny weather and relatively warm temps.........I think it sounds like fun......what do you think?
To me, nothing's too far. I gotta allow at least 1.5-2 hrs of riding just to get to and from the spot that I consider the START of my ride. It helps to have a comfortable bike, though. I've never ridden anything like a RC51 or Ducati which would have more "prison" style riding positions. Is that 4 hours each way or round trip? You may want to plan a couple of rest stops.
 

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I think part of it depends on what you are riding on. I am not sure I would want to drone away for 4 hours on highway. Boring!

But if you can work a back road route or it is not all Route 666 to nowhere then go for it!
 

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I bought my bike in Chicago and had it back in Dallas 2 days later after finding out just how awesome NW Arkansas really is (traderonline rocks). So, too far to me may be a little on the long side for most folks. I think however the route is the most crucial factor. If it's interstate, take the car and listen to tunes and talk about bikes on the way there. I just don't need to wear my expensive tires square on the interstate. Now, if there's some twisties or at least some scenery, 4 hours ain't too bad if you have time and good weather.
 

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4 hours is ok for starters, in my opinion. I could not ride with people who think 4 hours is too much.

I ride 4 hours, with a break about every hour and a half or when I need to get fuel, whichever is first. Then eat. Then ride another 3-4 hours before thinking about retiring for the day. If I am getting too hot or cold or a body part is uncomfortable, I will take more frequent breaks to refresh my body and my mental alertness.

Riding like you just robbed a bank will cause your mental energy to be drained much more rapidly than if you ride at a more reasonable speed. Keep that in mind too.

I rode 800 miles on the 8th straight day of riding to Florida from Seattle. While I made worse time on the prior days due to construction on the highways I was on, I rode into the night on several days of the trip, stopping many times during the day to look at the sights.

You need to make sure you ride alert and without distractions. If you start getting tired or cold or your little tush is getting tender in the saddle after a few hours, then it is probably best to stop at McDonald's and grab a Happy Meal, and head for the bunkhouse.

Maybe your buddies should be riding Electra Glides.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yeah....my thought exactly.....I'm just giving the guys a hard time though! It is all in fun......but Matt........come on.......:rolleyes:
 

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In my opinion the amount of time you ride depends on the conditions, just like everything else. Theres a big difference in riding for four hours on a curvy back road when your frequently braking, accelerating, and shifting. This keeps the rider involved and mentally alert. However riding in a straight line on the interstate following a car, tend's to get boring and the rider may lose his/her mental edge.
 

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Actually, you will find your riding time will be more limited in the curvy road sitiuation. Your mental energy is tapped out sooner, and you are physically challenged more.

The cement slab may be boring, but it is easy. When you get bored, you do mental games in your head. Did any of you see "Return With Honor"? Well, when those guys were holed up in Hanoi for up to 8 1/2 years, they kept their minds busy 24/7 especiallly when in their dark cells (which was all the time except maybe 15-20 min a day). Gotta be able to do that like a toggle switch when you are out on the road on a bike, otherwise you is toast.
 

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fuster said:
Actually, you will find your riding time will be more limited in the curvy road sitiuation. Your mental energy is tapped out sooner, and you are physically challenged more.
I'm the opposite. I can ride longer when I'm doing a lot of cornering. Long term droning down the interstate wears me out sooner. The wind, the unchanging seating position, the boredom.... :D
 

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Lets see. You guys live in Kentucky. O.K. Now get your ass to Los Angeles in four days. Take your curvy roads. If you manage to make it there, you won't be bored but you will be more tired than the guy that took all interstate to get there.

If you are talking a wimp ride, like a half day or a day, anybody can do that, and the choice of a curvy road is obvious. But if you only have so much time and you need to get somewhere for whatever reason, even if it is to just see the town, there is a reason why people choose the cement slab, and it has nothing to do with a short attention span.

I would rather ride the curves but will take a freeway to get to point B in the shortest time when that is what is needed. Taking a windy road because I can't pay attention (which sounds like what you are saying) long enough only means I have an attention problem, not a road problem. Which was my original point about staying alert. You cannot always choose the road, at least if you are beyond the typical "day rider". Or are you guys just day riders?
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hey Fuster....does Matt have a mouse in his pocket........? I'll ride anywhere, on any road.......as long as it is not snowing or pouring rain.......as long as I am in the saddle.........what's your excuse Matt?:crying: .......:D
 

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Give me a nice day and a mix of interstate and twisty two lane and I'll see you the following day. If there is one thing I can't stand is people that buy a bike and hardly ever leave the town they bought the bike in or thier home town. I'am half temped to ride down to Lexington and go to the track day with you. That would be eight plus hours of riding for me one way but thats OK. I'am not a wimp like some others and I tend to agree with Fuster.

PS. When I did not own the best long distance bike I still put in long hours riding just for the joy of riding. Four hours should just be a warm-up for a fun day of riding unless your a wimp.

PPS. If it is a TRACK bike I would not recomend race compound tires on the street since that will kill them but that dose not appear to be what we are talking about here.
 
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