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Discussion Starter #1
I went for a nice ride this past saturday with 23 other riders. 3 other ones in particular with sportbikes were excellant in the twisties. I was able to keep pace but needed to lean over more than they did. What do you do when you hang off to lower center of gravity? I used to keep my outside leg against the bike, but looking at racers pics i notice they point the toe out and only the calf touches seat. Anyway what do u think? :D

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Keep Your feet on the pegs and your right hand cranked!
 

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should this really be in the daily rider forum?

anyway, what i do is i hang my whole ass off the seat. then i put my outside forearm on the tank. and then try to force the bike upwards.

my inside foot i also keep pointed somewhat towards the ground with my foot on the frame or rearset (not sure which). this is just me, but i finish last.

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Tony

the views and opinions expressed by tony (cbrf2boy) are the ramblings of a total idiot. sbw.com, it's administrators, moderators, and members don't necessarily agree with and are not responsible for anything this idiot has to say.

for more ramblings try cbrf2boy
 

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Like this :D

Notice the puck on the helmet.

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Kyle M. m/16 Noblesville,IN

If you're a poser and you know it, clap your hands.

"Big Dick's HARDCORE Road Racing School, where we drag more than our knees."

[This message has been edited by The_CB_Kid (edited October 03, 2000).]
 

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You definately need to read Kieth Code's "Twist of the Wrist II"

When I lean off, I usually just hang on cheek off. One thing that helps me turn in quicker is to steer more with my feet, and less with my hands.

It's a funny sensation to do this, so it's good to practice on a straight road and swerve side to side. You push your inside knee out, and apply outward/downward pressure on the footpeg in the direction of the turn. If you're basically squating on the bike, and not sitting, this does a good deal to lower the center of gravity, as well as enhance stability.

I think the key part is to relax, and try not to upset the bike when moving around.

But before you ride another mile, read Code's book.

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Yes mom, I promise this is the last bike I'll buy (this year....)
 

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I lock my outside leg against the frame,
fairing and seat while sitting on the edge
of the opposited side of the seat. I bow my
leg out to get a feel for where the ground
is and then when I lean the bike over (using
both hands and feet) I start to tuck my
knee back up towards the bike so that highspots
in the road don't non-surgically remove my
knee cap (Can you say "Buy sliders Chris"?).

And whoever that is dragging there head wins
my vote for originality - That's just flat
out ballsy and bizzare.


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I really should be working...

[This message has been edited by chris_y2k_r1 (edited October 04, 2000).]
 

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I keep hearing about Twist of the Wrist, but Ive never seen it. Anyone know where I can get a copy???

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Later.
Let natural selection do its job!!!
 

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ebay. very cheap like $1.50-$10.00 cheap. I got all three books and the video for $11.00 + s/h

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Kyle M. m/16 Noblesville,IN

If you're a poser and you know it, clap your hands.

"Big Dick's HARDCORE Road Racing School, where we drag more than our knees."
 

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I got "Twist-o-Wrist II" at Barnes & Noble for $20. Well worth every penny.
I keep it right next to my chair and read through it all the time.

Hey Kyle, Is the video any good?

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Dave fzR1

"When I grow up... I wanna be a SQUIIIID!"

[This message has been edited by Ratsalad (edited October 07, 2000).]
 

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well I havent seen any other m/c videos to comapre it to ,but it better explaned the books

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Kyle M. m/16 Noblesville,IN

If you're a poser and you know it, clap your hands.

"Big Dick's HARDCORE Road Racing School, where we drag more than our knees."
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the advice folks. Looks like my problem was that i was sitting on the bike while cornering. I should have been squating on it. This was some high speed sweepers which i never did before. We were zipping along at 190km/h. Just under 120mph i guess. The guy i was folowing had a yzf1000 and never touched down. i got an R6 and scrapped the peg, just goes to show you how much differce technique makes.

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Keep Your feet on the pegs and your right hand cranked!
 

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1) Do all of your sliding and moving BEFORE you start turning. Take the weight on your pegs as needed but don't actually lift off the seat any more than necessary to slide over. Put the balls of your feet on the pegs, not your arches with your feet hanging down.
2) For starters at least, only one cheek off and keep the crack of your ass in line with the bike. DON'T twist your whole body. Outer knee against the tank, inner knee out will be somewhat natural position when keeping your body in line with the bike.
3) As you go in to the turn, try loading the OUTSIDE peg without actually lifting yourself off the bike. This makes the steering easier and lowers the center of gravity. When done right, it feels right.
4) Ride with someone who knows what they're doing (preferably with track time) and they can help you with this and critique what you are doing. I am sure that the Kieth Code books already suggested will have a more thorough description of this with much more detail, but maybe this can help get you started in the right direction.

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Discussion Starter #12
I was told by one of the riders not to keep knee against the tank :confused: . he said that raises centre of gravity. he also said weigh the inside peg more than the outside one. I was trying alot of different stuff that day. But in general i was with one check off the seat, knee out and would counter steer in and out of the corners. I think my biggest problem that day was.... I was tired and not looking far ahead enuff, have never actually gone so fast in sweepers. I was at 190km/h for 47km of non stop left and rights. My throttle management was bad cuz i would be full or off, this was screwing me up with my lean angles. I would allways be adjusting the bike lean. Im going to a racing school next year to fine tune my technique. The only 2 guys who were better than me are 10-15 years older with probably double the experience and lotsa track time.

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Keep Your feet on the pegs and your right hand cranked!
 

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There is truth that the higher contact points raise the center of gravity but you need reference points to feel the bike and stabilize your inputs. Some people use arms on tank, knees (as described), feet, etc. Some of these things are optional to the rider's preference and comfort level and might even be dictated by various minor design differences between bikes (tank shape, peg location, etc.) but having references are very important to the final result. One thing that I didn't mention because I assumed it would be understood before "hanging off" was attempted, is to be sure you're not carrying any of your weight on your hands/bars and work on smooth throttle control and a controlled, smooth line. As far as weighting the outside peg goes, it makes a very good anchor point for overall leverage making a lot of the inputs just feel easier which converts to smoother, and by default accomplishes the "lowering center of gravity" point that you are making. Any weight placed on the peg is weight that isn't placed somewhere else. The more I think about how to describe this the more I think this isn't an adequate forum to cover this subject because so many other things have to be right and it's the whole picture that makes it work, not just one segment. I have been advised that this is nicely covered in one of the Keith Code books and would strongly suggest that the price of the books is way cheaper than plastic and surgery... or a combination thereof. At least, what has been described shouldn't send anybody off in a totally wrong direction. Be sure you have practiced unloading the bars, smooth throttle control all of the way through a corner, turning in at the proper time with a nice smooth line, and even finding your anchor points BEFORE to worry about "hanging off". Just my opinion. Meanwhile... isn't it fun? By the way, I'm 47 years old, riding a LOT for 31 of those years, and still love a good, fast ride.

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[This message has been edited by Dad (edited October 12, 2000).]

[This message has been edited by Dad (edited October 12, 2000).]
 
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