Sportbike World banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Okay... all you guys that ride A LOT.... It's been years since I've ridden and I see many questions in other threads that have prompted me to just ask for some help on technique. I know it's probably very difficult to explain over a forum, but... .it might help some of us.

I was thinking some advice on various "situations" that come up when riding would be helpful and how to get out of them.

My particular interest is in "how you are to properly lay a bike down". I've read several things and have heard even more things to do to properly lay one down. And know what... Tuesday when I had to.... I can't tell you if I did ANY of them correctly or at all. :rolleyes: I can see how to easily get away from / off the bike if you are in a slide already, but for instance if you are straight up and know you need to lay it down (car in front of you maybe?) how do you properly put it down and get away from it?

May seem remedial to most of you guys, but maybe it'll help someone else not "wait to long" as I did to lay it down.:p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,517 Posts
The only time I can see intentionally laying the bike down is if Im going down the street WAY to fast and a big rig pulls out in front of me and I have to go under the trailer! :rolleyes:


Basically, I dont think I would ever just give up hope of escape and lay the bike down.

On the other hand, when you do lay the bike down, I doubt you'll have much say in how it goes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
591 Posts
KneeDragger98ZX said:
if you are straight up and know you need to lay it down (car in front of you maybe?) how do you properly put it down and get away from it?
I can visualize very few (no?) situations where laying a bike down would be preferable to using the brakes/tires to bleed as much speed as possible before (possible) impact, especially if you're "straight up". If you do hit, would you rather go over or under? At's a pretty tough choice to make, and sounds to me like there are just too many variables to give a definitive answer on that choice. I'm thinking I might be inclined to go over what I hit...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Oooookay... :eek: feelin like a retard now...... lol
I was just thinking that if I'm even straight up... and heading for something that I know I'm going to impact... that I'd want to lay it down and get away as quick as possible.

Apparently I am in a minority. I don't have all the time in the saddle as most of you guys.... so just overlook if/when I ask tarded things.:rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,429 Posts
Better to ask retarded questions than go and do retarded things (like "layin' it down" to avoid hitting something). Metal, plastic, and even leather slide much more readily than the rubber on your tires, so when you lay 'er down, you and the bike will head toward the undesirable object even faster! Get some real training before you kill yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
This is kind of like a guy falling from the roof of a 20th story building asking a guy looking out a 15th story window for help.

You may have had previous experience with dirt bikes where the consequences of a lay-down are rather minimal.

On the street, the consequences are dire at best. Under 20 mph, you might get away with it. But, even then you may survive the lay-down only to get hit by a car.

You go where you look. I recently heard a statistic that a substantial number of the cars that motorcyclists hit had many feet of run off on either side, yet the bike hit the car with the expected results.

Advice: Don't target fixate on the problem. Look away from it.

Your lay-down will most likely be induced by a locked up rear wheel. Forget your rear brake. The front brake is strong enough to lift the rear off of the ground. You just might be able to stop before you hit the obstacle if you concentrate on the front.

Advice: practice panic stops with the empahsis on use of the front brake.

You may very well could have avoided the situation with a little advanced planning. Always assume the car driver will do the worst possible thing at the worst possible time and have a plan for that contingency.

Advice: Constantly be aware of possible peril and have a plan to avoid it.

Sand, oil, water. Look ahead, notice discolorations on the road surface. On blind turns, reduce you speed.

Advice: when in doubt, slow down.

Advice: Take an MSF course and practice, practice, practice.

Good Luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
MSF class taught me, if you have time to lay the bike down, you have time to do something else to avoid the accident. Thing is, once you lay the bike over, you have no control where it goes. I agree with HondaNut, though. Hehe, but that's because it would look cool. Still, it would look cooler if you were pulling a Nicky Hayden and rubbing your elbow on the ground while going underneath the rig. Dang... all this talk about motorcycle safety and I think of ways I can kill myself. Hmm... anyone have an R1 for me while I'm at it? :D

Omega
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
Desmo has made most of the points I would have made here (along with the others). Why would you want to HAVE an accident to try to avoid one? It is never preferable to lay the bike down, unless you are in the process of a lowside and the only other option is to a) chop the throttle and highside, or, b) release the rear brake and highside. In that case, you may be better off to just ride it down on the lowside. But, that's a matter of choosing the lesser of two evils....you are already going to crash and you are just trying to control the crash as much as possible. However, if you find yourself in that position on the street, it means you were over-riding the prevailing conditions.

The key here is to ride within the limits set by prevailing conditions and practice practice practice your braking and swerving techniques. The braking practice can mean the difference between hitting an obstacle and almost hitting an obstacle. You can get away with some pretty extreme swerving even under hard braking with a little practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
First off, I apologise. when I first read this post I thought, "What an Idiot! How do you properly lay down a bike? He is stupid." but then after thinking a bit I realized that this is a valid question. Sorry.

I realize that I have gotten into a few situations where I was sure that my bike and I were gonners. I was just sure that my bike was going down, but had no clue what to do. My buddy layed his down and somehow managed to get on top of it and basically looked like he was surfing down the road on his 900RR. that cant be good, his bike was totaled, but he was unharmed. at what point do you try to sacrifice your self to save the bike? I think that I would be willing to wear a cast for a while to save my bike, but then I havent been that situation. YET! (I know it aint IF its WHEN. :) )


Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,400 Posts
Basiclly all the answers are there above.

First of all slow down, secondly is to stay a proper distance from a fellow rider or a cage. Remembering that IN TOWN is at a slower pace, though congested & anything can happen, so stopping time is quicker. On the hwy one must realize it will take longer to stop at max limit speed & even more so when above that speed.
To many riders tend to ride as close as sardines in a tin can.
One can lay a bike down in the dirt knowing footrests, handlebars & such will dig in & help slow the bike down (I speak as an ex-dirt comp rider) BUT on the pavement the fastest way to STOP is to apply your brakes & so by using the rubber of the tyres, for it you lay the bike down it will slide for an amazing distance.
As others have said, get out & practice emergency stopping AND remember to ALSO use the r/brake. I know many riders ONLY use the f/brake, but believe me that extra 5 or 10% from the rear is EXACTLY that being some additional help & in an emergency situation you need ALL the help you can obtain even if you will end up hitting the cage you were trying to avoid. While many do NOT I actually am tapping the rear brake on normal stopping & in that way it is not once in a life time that I might try tapping it.
Beleive me many of us have a LOT of experience in similiar situations & not just something we have read about & 1 or 2 yrs of riding, but many more yrs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
As others have said, get out & practice emergency stopping AND remember to ALSO use the r/brake. I know many riders ONLY use the f/brake, but believe me that extra 5 or 10% from the rear ........... (from post above)

Dont you guys use the rear brake? I always do if its more than a rolling stop. :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
106 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
First I want to thank everyone for the input. AND for not dogging me too much. I guess my situation was slightly different.... I went into a hard left turn... everything was fine, I was on the inside of me lane and then coming around the curve was a little red 'cage' about half way in my lane. I quickly shifted to the outside of my lane and whizzed by him, but as I leaned back into the curve it was apparent I was going to be cutting it really close to get around the rest of the curve. I guess moving to the outside quick made it a lot tougher to come back to the inside, makes sense ( an object in motion... etc. )

Anyway.... I could feel it giving slightly (what felt like it giving at least) and then felt the back wheel drop off the pavement and hit the gravel. At this point I went off the side of the road into the gravel and then down into the grass along side of the road in the slightly indented ditch-line parallel with the road. I managed to get the bike upright and was heading straight down the 'ditch'. I'm sure I was shooting a friggin rooster tail up back there, shutting it down as quick as I could. Apparently I hit something with the front tire (forks are bent) and that's about the last detail I remember. I mean... I remember flippin around and spinning and stuff but I couldn't give any REAL details after that point.

My bike ended up next to me pointing back where we had come from. I took my time getting up and then started the analyzing... if I had just layed it down ( I know some of you dont' LIKE that term, YES I admit to crashing LOL ) would it have been better. Guess it's a little different off in the pastureland than on asphalt, I should have detailed that before, it's not the norm I assume.

Anyway... thanks a ton for all the advice and rest assured I WILL be practicing as suggested. Thanks again for not bashing me too much. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
It's really hard to say what you're gonna do when put on the spot like that Kneedragger. Easy to say when someone gives you a situation and people are like, oh yeah, I'd do this or that, makes it look easy. I look at it this way... If you did it and lived, then you probably did something right. Or just got really really lucky. But the final truth is, you're alive! In regards to laying the bike down, you have more control, braking power, etc. with your tires on the ground.

But here's something else to think about. Whatever your front wheel hit was strong enough to bend your forks, flip YOU over, flip YOUR BIKE over.... What would it have done to you if your body, head, leg, etc. had hit it?

I'm glad your okay, alive, and able to relate your story so that those who haven't been in your situation can learn from it. Heal right, heal quickly, and ride safe.

Omega Purp
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,188 Posts
I think you have been selling your self short. In your more detailed account, it seems to me you did a spectacular job of saving your ass. Let's see........head-on crash versus off road expedition into a ditch, yeah, you did fine. I don't think I could have done much better. Nonehteless, I think ALL of the above advice still applies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Shoot, sounds like you did a pretty good job of saving yourself from a head-on crash considering the circumstances.

The only input I think that might help, and one I have to keep reminding myself of, is to avoid the inside of your lane on a turn where you can't see all the way through. If you had been in the middle of your lane when confronted by the car you would have had to adjust less and probably avoided the ditch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
JUST MY TWO CENTS WORTH

WHEN we ride on the street it is not like the racetrack you have to assume that there IS a car crossing the yellow line around that corner unless you can see for yourself that there is not. i enjoy myself when i ride but i am not going to confuse the street for a racetrack, actually in my area it is not cars as much as it is huge motorhomes pulling trailers or boats that cross the yellow line.

ride safe joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Your bike will slide a lot farther from speed then it would take to stop. You should NEVER intentionally lay down the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,547 Posts
Tristan said:
"Advice: when in doubt, slow down"

All Desmo's advice was good except this. We all know the old saying (so true) is "when in doubt, gas it!"
I thought it was "when in doubt, empty the clip????"
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top