Sportbike World banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
It won't happen to you right. Just a slow ride around the neighbor hood on your new bike. What could go wrong?

Well a friend of mine wanted to get his first bike, so I went with him, checked it out and rode it home for him. Upon parking it in his drive way I gave him the speech... "Do not ride this bike until I take you out and give you atleast some understanding of how things work and why! Do not ever get on it with out full gear! Ever! That includes good MOTORCYCLE gloves, armoured jacket, Cortech pants or leather, and a high quality above the ankle boot at the very least, and of course a NEW, FULL FACE, SNELL APPROVED helmet. I don't care how slow you're going to go or how short the distance. EVER!"
Today he bought his helmet. A Fulmer something or other. Nice and shiny. Couldn't resist putting it on. Couldnt resist sitting on the bike and starting it up. Could't resist going for a nice little ride around the neighborhood in jeans and a T- Shirt. Couldn't avoid target fixating on the mailbox and making full head on contact with it at 25mph. As i write he is at the hospital with a concussion, a broken arm, a broken hand, and pretty bad rode rash across his back. The helmet saved his life I'm sure. It was pretty mangled. The bike flipped end over end and is totaled. The mail box didn't do so well either.

My point. These things can be really dangerous. Don't ride until you have someone who is experienced give you some lessons. Learn in a nice big parking lot. TAKE AN MSF COURSE! and read every book you can find.
All of his injuries (other than the concussion could have been avoided by gear. His arm was broken when the mail box hit his forarm exactly where the armour would have been. His hand was broke just below the knuckle exactly where the carbon fiber protection available on most gloves would have been. The road rash would have been prevented by leather.

Just a little ride around the block. What could go wrong?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
418 Posts
Not to try to classify people into groups but I was just curious. How old was he? Was he one of those compulsive types or generally level headed? What type of bike?

Sorry to hear about the disastorous first experience.

Although I do sympathize with the temptation but I'm also curious how he got there. Absolutely first time ever on a motorcycle?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
He is 25. He's a little impulsive but pretty well grounded. He's actually the manager of a bar I own. He was on a YZF 600. He Just wanted to ride so bad that he didn't want to wait to for some one to show him how. I Know some people are going to gripe about the bike, but it was my recommendation. I think the lower performance 600cc bikes are great for starting if you take the time to get trained. They are not so fast that you run them in to a mail box..... uhhh... I mean grab too much throtle and are instantly going 100mph in a 25mph turn but not so weak that you get bored in a year. I learned to ride on an old beat up 600 Katana and it was perfect.
I will say again to any newbies reading this thread. Take an MSF course and read, read, read. Wear your gear! Yeah I know it can be expensive but It's way cheaper than medical bills and missing work for "x" number of days!
Here is a little added tip I Just found out. There is a guy doing research on motorcycle injuries and he has found that statistically injuries occur most frequently from the feet up. I wasn't aware of this. Of course the head is most important, but beyond that he has found that more injuries occur at the feet and ankles, the knees, and continue up from there. So for those of you who think a leather jacket is enough protection and go riding around in your tennis shoes, you may want to re-think you gear choices. I will post the link to the article if I can find it again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Sorry to hear about your friends accident :( I have never owned my own bike, but plan on it soon. My friend races a Kawasaki 600cc, I think its a 99? anyways, he has taught me a lot, and I almost want to buy a 500cc to learn on, but know that I will soon get bored with it and feel the urge for more power. I plan on buying a 600cc bike as my first and taking every course I can, while having him help me learn on the side. I have seen a lot of accidents due to what you guys call 'squids', and unlike others I have learned from them. I don't want the bike to hotrod through traffic, I just want to daily drive it and occasionally hit the hills/back roads. I wish your friend luck with his recovery, and hopefully he learned from his lesson.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,400 Posts
I am sorry that so many people new to the sport of m/cing cannot lower themselves into a proper m/c but MUST have a 600 otherwise they will be bored to death on a m/c that will not put them to death or scare the crap out of them in no time at all.
So they make it though the lst season & become bored to death with the 600 & there is only one more step up the ladder being a fast trotting 1000cc. After that IF they have survived then it is stop riding for there is nothing else to look forward to up the ladder--really is that what m/c is to be?
You buy a sportbike which is with a peaky engine that is a guttless jerky thing at low revs & in town speeds, but one that will send you on your ear if you just accidently turn up the wick. Good Lord a sportbike is a 'relica' of a professional road racing m/c not only in appearnce, but in handeling & power.
If you want to enjoy m/cing believe me a bike like a 500cc vertical twin in a more upright riding position, one with good brakes, broader handlebars ideal for one new to the sport & with a power-plant that has so much SMOOTH & good power at the lower revs. This should not bore one to death, but teach them how to ride sensibly. Man it is going to be a task to learn how to deal with the cage drivers, the strange stuff on the road that will put on down extremely fast, & later on how to ride the bike at a faster pace on the hwys to take in the bends, etc.
Start out on something sensible, remembering that the present 500 to 550cc vertical twins of to-day are more powerful, far superior in handeling & with best of brakes compared to what so many of us started on just 10 yrs ago let alone myself in 1945 with a '38 Harley 45 cu. inch (750cc) with 25hp while the 500 you will be looking at is with something of around 55hp which is equal to the dream bike of all being the Vincent 1000cc & its 55hp being classed as the fastest stock bike in the world though that was a bit stretched as said record was not obtained on a stock bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,400 Posts
YES with a slow moving 500/550cc you can take off from the green light faster then most cars & scare the 'ell out yourself when on the hwy clocking 100+mph as you 'ear it through the tight bends. Once you have learned how to survive on said bike AND built up proper riding EXPERIENCE then you can look forward to a 600 sportbike, its lean forward riding position, the saddle that will give you battle scars after 3 hrs of riding, the peaky enging you will have to learn how to deal with, etc.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,059 Posts
Unfortunatly, these things happen..I therefore agree with what's been said thus far...Just to give another example of a new rider, that would normally be resopnsible..at least from what they say on the boards..is ..this is my first bike, never roade before...what bike should I get..I'm looking at 600's, maybe a 750....:eek: Is my first reaction..then , some rider that bought a 750, and has been riding 3 months, or less, says..don't listen to the fools that tell ya to get a 250, 500, something that's gonna let you learn to ride easier, and faster, than to get on a 150 mph 600, and be scared for the 1st 6 months they ride, he goes on to say, I bought a 750, or a 600, and I'm doing fine, just be resepectful of the throttle, well IMHO...that don't cut it, and here is an unfortunate example of why I try to talk new riders in to getting a smaller bike, and good quality gear, and have that gear on, EVERY time they ride. I think Idonthaveagsxr, was being a value to the sport, and to the human race as well, by offering his experience of riding, and his willingness to teach his friend the better points of riding, just to bad he didn't listen, as do most of the new riders that ASK for advice, but when they don't hear what they want, i.e...yeah, go out and get that 600, or 750, they get all in an uproar...why ask for advice, if you never intend on following it..riders with 10' of 1000's of miles of riding experience, know a bit more than some one who has but a few 100 miles of riding experience..It get frustrating for me, but I'll never stop trying to educate a new rider...:thumb:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
This is why I've been looking up all I can about bikes and gear and am gonna take the msf course. Tomorrow I am going down to the dealer with a couple of other friends who are also thinking of riding, to ask for a professional opinion on the proper bike etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
HalfChuck said:
This is why I've been looking up all I can about bikes and gear and am gonna take the msf course. Tomorrow I am going down to the dealer with a couple of other friends who are also thinking of riding, to ask for a professional opinion on the proper bike etc.
Be wary of a salesmen's advice. I've seen several that have talked newbs into bikes they have no business on. Sales reps are out for thier comission, not your best interests.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,400 Posts
Anyone new to this m/cing world has to remember some very important facts of life.
EXPERIENCE is something they do not have. One barely starts to pick that up in the MSF course & interestingly enough the bikes they provide at not fast trotting 600 to 1000cc bikes, but around the 125 to 250cc size BECAUSE they are easy to handle & smooth power at most revs. Not to mention that they are lower in saddle height so one's feet are planted firmly on the ground & not just barely able to touch one's feet, bar those of 6' or taller.
A m/c is a strange two wheeled & self propelled thing & nothing like the solidly balanced four wheel car so many have been drivng with the auto cog box they have driven all their life ----latter can be a problem when one is trying to learn how to shift gears, slip clutch & of all things the front brake (80% of your stopping power) is combined with the throttle that rolls.
ALSO remember from the very moment one gets on it & starts to roll till the time they stop they MUST be able to BALANCE the darn thing & there are so many things on the surface of the road that can make it hard to keep the bike upright & balanced like a bit of sand or gravel, some oil or ------ it is endless.
Above all one must remember a fender bender with your cage & another cage well that is a cost factor that both of you might settle upon or leave it up to the insurance firms, BUT if it is YOU on the m/c & even if the cage is in the wrong then there is a good chance your bike is down & damaged from a few hundred dollars to a few thousand or being totalled & you are on the pavement wondering what has happened or possibly you are on the way to the hospital with extensive injuries.
So do you want a m/c to LEARN on with smooth lower rpm power to its peak revs at 100+mph or do you want a m/c that will catch the eyes of all yet IT frightens you & is a bitch to ride around town? It is up to you.
Sort of like you want to learn how to shoot a h/gun you start off with a .22 that does not have much kick, & not overly costly, but if you go for a 44 Magnum Dirty Harry special or costly breathed on (by gunsmith or factory) 45ACP semi-auto you will never learn how to group shots & shoot accurately.
Long & drawen out ------ true, but my hope is that you will still be a good rider 10 to 20 yrs from now & not one of many that were killed or badly injured within the first few days or months of your first m/c.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,644 Posts
sorry about your friend, and thank you for the post. i hope that many people learn from this. is your friend going to ride again?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
I'm taking the MSF course starting 29th of this month. I was thinking about the sv650s, rather than a yzf-600r, weight factor and less hp. What do you guys think about the sv650s for a new rider? I'm 6'3'' 200lbs if that helps.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,644 Posts
i think the sv650 and sv650s are two of the best bikes there are.

and at 6'3, 200 lbs, it'll have no problem towing you around. there's a guy in my region named steve keener. he races one (his is far from stock). anyway, he used to be called 'bigfoot' and it tows him around to second place in last year's regional point chase. i believe he finished fifth in ama pro thunder on his.

if you learn to ride the right way, you'll wear it out before you'll ever really out grow it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
I just got back from signing up for the MSF course, it's on the 29th of this month and the 1st and 2nd of Feb. On the way back we stopped at a cycle shop and they had suzukis, and an unused 2002 silver 650s for 6,000. Also had a sexy HJC black chrome helmet, mmmm black chrome *drool*.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,400 Posts
Advantage of the SV650 or SV650S compared to other sportbikes is that that it is with a V-twin engine which will give you better pull at lower rpm.
Best to sit on BOTH for a while & decided if you want the lower & shorter bars along with it being a hair higher in gearing then the SV650. It is not the extreme seating position of GSXR, R6 or very latest Honda 600 & a bit closer to the Yamaha YZF600r.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top