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Discussion Starter #1
my roommate was driving us to McDonalds when I spot someone struggling to pick up their bike on the entrance to a gas station. I immediately told my friend to stop the car, and she reluctantly pulled into the gas station and I run over and ask the guy if he needs help.

helped stand the bike up and watched him get on it and try to start the engine figured I'd wait for the engine to start up before I head back out. He couldn't get the engine to start, I looked down and saw that the gas was in the 'off' position so I just turned it to on and watch him try again. I start a small convo w/ him telling him I ride an f3 as well and tell him my bike takes some time to start up again after its been tipped over, and then realized he may have tipped the bike over as it stalled due to lack of gas. so I switched on the choke, pressing the starter as I twist the throttle a bit and sure enough after half a minute or so, it comes back to life.

now, I feel pretty good for helping out another rider, but as I sit back at home and think about it, he seemed like he was in a rush, maybe frustrated from dropping his bike and all. but he really gave off a big noobish vibe, like he wasn't comfortable w/ the controls of the bike, I was acting the same way w/ that same :confused: look as he did when I first got my f3. makes me think I should have kept talking to him after I got the bike started to see if he was alright or at least calm his nerves down a bit. I dunno, what do you guys think? was there anything else I could have done at that point? I more or less just said 'take it easy' and walked away after he thanked me... only to find out from my friend that the dude was heading towards the freeway, and this was at the start of afternoon traffic in LA. hope the dude's ok.
 

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And if anything, it was really cool of you to even pull over and help him. Most people wouldn't do that.

Besides, not like you're going to give him a full instruction on how to ride a bike at a gas station!
 

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I suppose if I dropped my bike and couldn't pick it up, that would be the case. Most likely I would rather avoid talking to people since I would be very emabarrased.
 

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Nomad,
Sounds like you did the right thing and he probably was a little rattled. I encountered a similar situation while I was riding. Got behind two bikes (male and female) and the lady was obviously learning. The dude was wearing loafers and had his lady learning in rush hour no less. He pulled out in front of traffic and when it was her turn I realized that she didn't see an SUV coming from one direction. When she noticed, she was already halfway in the lane and hit her brakes, no foot down, and dropped it. I went up to help her pick it up, ZX6 IIRC, and she looked at me like where'd this guy with a helmet on come from. Eventually her partner turned around and I wanted to slap him for having her out at that time of day, she could have gotten killed.
Sorry for the long story. It just illustrates how difficult it can be learning to ride.
 

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Having been there before (on both sides), its my opinion you did what should have been done. Sticking around might have only served to extend his embarassment and uneasiness. But its hard to guess b/c everybody reacts differently to each situation.
 

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Speaking from personal preference, if I were to drop my bike it would make my day if another fellow rider came to the rescue no questions asked. I would be no more embarrased then I already was if someone did come to help out.

I've dropped my bike( slowly, at a stop) numerous times now. So far I have had to pick up the bike by myself most the times, and my bike is heavy as shit compared to the other 600cc out. It weighs in about 450lbs on a full tank! There were 2 or 3 times when I was with fellow riders when this happened and it made a world of difference(mentally and physically) when I had my comrades helping me get her back up. Every real rider knows that sooner or later (sooner than later) they are going to drop their bike.

The only time I would be truely embarresed when dropping my bike is if I was doing something squidish like reving the engine at a stop light really high in first and letting the clutch out too fast and flipping the bike into the intersection. Now if I was in an abandoned parking lot practicing stunts/stops and I dropped it, I wouldn't least bit embarrased. Thats equivilant to getting tackled in football, you're expecting it. Riding is a sport, and in every physical sport that I like, falling is an everyday occurance:thumb:

You did the right thing Nomad, keep doing what you're doing, and ride safe.
 

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Nomad, the only thing you need to know is that ANYTHING you did to help the guy out is considered a good deed.

Well done, mate. :thumbs2:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thanks, just a little mixed up about it because as I helped the guy pick up his bike, he immediately tells me its his first time dropping it or something to that effect. and after a few minutes of trying to start his bike I just kind of stepped in and started it up for him. it makes me feel kinda rude to have just kinda stepped in while he was still trying, though he did look confused and a little frustrated. but like some of you have said, I guess it would have been worse and quite patronizing if I stayed and watched him leave before I did :D
 

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I would honesty say Nomad that you did a lot to help him. I will often stop to help a fellow rider & in most cases they are just doing up the zippers of their jackets for when you get up in altitude of the Cdn Rockie Mtn roads you tend to notice the COLD that you did not notice at said lower altitude.

Last year I stopped to chap a HD rider though all I have is a 13mm spanner that takes the place of a 1/2". Though he had most of the work done on the bike & I was not goint to ask him what was he doing. Just that he was satisfied with the progress 90% completed & thanked me.

Still helping a fellow rider lift up his bike, then to correct the no starting problems means a lot. POSSIBLY this was his first venture with the bike, but then I would not lecture him about taking the MSF Course, so yes you did what most of us would have.
 

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Much credit to you for realizing that the person must have been pretty exticted after dropping his bike. Awhile back a girl on a SV dropped her bike in front of me at a stop sign and I helped her pick up the bike and asked if she was OK and let her ride off w/o trying to calm her down first. As she took off again she looked really wobbly. Big :thumb: to you!
 

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oddly the only guys i have helped pick up there bikes are old dude on monster goldwings, damn those things are heavy lol
 

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I think you did as much as you could do. About a year and a half ago an old lady cut me off and I ended up having a pretty bad spill at 50 MPH just to avoid hitting her. I broke my right wrist and fractured my left arm. No one stopped to help me. All I got was some lady cursing at me out the window becasue I held up traffic. You did the right thing ;)
 

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Back in '99 some woman, with this tank of a lincon was signalling she was going to turn right at this four-way crossing & that was fine for I was going to stop & make a left turn.

Suddenly she realized she should be turning LEFT & went over some small cement things (now there is a medium there) & right through the STOP sign also nicked the front wheel of my Yamaha YZF600r. So I am off the bike trying to not lay it down ------ you know at the point of it was going to be dropped or I would get the lift.

Of all things the car on my opposit side of the four-way crossing was driven by a chap in 65 or over. He had the emergencie lights blinking, had accidently left the drivers door open, in haste to try & help me even though he was limping badly in his attempt to sort of run & help.

Fortunately I had the bike upright & about to mount it. So he said he saw how wrong this woman was though he could not remember the LP number. I thanked him & said all was okay & I agree for as we get into age we tend to forget things like LP numbers.

I do not think he realized at the time I was 69 yrs of age, due to FFHelmet & the fact that I was riding a sportbike. Still the big thing is that chap did all he could to possibly help me & yes I remember that incident well. Said m/c rider that dropped his bike will probably remember someone in a cage stepped out to help him along with getting the bike restarted!!!!!!
 

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You did the right thing. Helped him get rolling again. Like others said you are not going to give him and full lesson at the gas station. Aside from picking it up and getting it started there isn't much else to do. Besides nobody other than another rider is going to stop and help a fallen rider anyway. :twofinger
 

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Discussion Starter #16
what was funny was that when he thanked me I told him I also own an F3 and that its no problem as riders should stick together and help each other out he kind of gave a forced "hehe" sort of laugh, kinda like getting that lightbulb turned on inside your head and thinking "oh that's what we're supposed to do?"

hopefully he just passes it on, I've stopped on the freeways on two occassions and cagers have stopped to ask if I needed help... didn't really need help at the time, but the gesture is always nice and very much appreciated
 

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Discussion Starter #17
wheelie_steve said:
I think you did as much as you could do. About a year and a half ago an old lady cut me off and I ended up having a pretty bad spill at 50 MPH just to avoid hitting her. I broke my right wrist and fractured my left arm. No one stopped to help me. All I got was some lady cursing at me out the window becasue I held up traffic. You did the right thing ;)
man, that's just horrible, that's like adding insult to injury and very counterproductive. Just like yelling at the driver of a car who's stalled and is pouring out black smoke from the engine... bad enough to have that misfortune, and then to get yelled at for being "inconvenient" to everyone else :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
and today I just got good karma sent back to me. I was w/ a few riders going to a small parking lot practice session when one of them stops me due to oil leaking from my engine and getting all over my rear tire. we stopped and waited for one of the instructors to backtrack w/ a truck to take my bike to the lot, to be picked up by the shop that recently tuned my bike. While at the lot the same instructor loaned me one of his bikes so I can go ahead and ride today. Lost my bike but thanks to a bunch of cool people I still managed to get some ride time and learn better riding techniques. :thumb:
 

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It was surprising to hear that you broke down on the way. But yes, the people we were riding with were awsome and very helpful. Good luck with the shop. Hope they fix it up for you.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
thanks, still no clue what the problem is right now, hopefully i'll get some news tomorrow but i'm sure they've got a lot of other bikes they're scheduled to work on as well. good to meet you, I'll probably be riding w/ those guys again on the weekends as soon as the bike comes back into my possession.
 
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