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Hey there guys,

After moving to a city with OUTRAGOUS parking costs, california emissions standards and a stigma against cars....I decided to learn all I can about motorcycles. I am a former Honda tuner guy (Go before show...non of that neon crap) and love the effecientcy I was seeing in all aspects of my Honda. So here I am to learn about the freedom from the cage. I am going to take the Motorcycle safety course for damn sure. But I just wanted to pop in and make my presence known rather than stay Beau the lurker.

What kind of bikes would be a good match for urban riding like in San Fran? Enduros, sport? and of course I am getting a 250cc or less to learn on...No squid bikes for me please.

Thank you all for the wonderful source of knowledge and I look forward to learning a lot. :cool:

Beau
 

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Welcome to SBW!!

Never ridden an enduro, but I dont see it working any better than a sportbike in a city situation. The biggest downside of bikes for transportation is lack of storage space. Well and the medical bills :)
 

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S370HSSV 0773H
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Having had a bike stolen in the SF area and another one totalled due to some asshole's inability to drive, I would not own one and live in California again.

I think I'd be mostly worried about theft in SF, but traffic there does result in a lot of accidents. Before my in-laws left there it semed they were talking about motorcyclists being killed at least weekly, if not daily.

Great roads in the area, just too many people to make it any fun. Both of our bikes were sportbikes, and they did just fine out there. If you have a longer commute you may want a more upright riding position, but it never really bothered me commuting 65 miles each way. :2cents:


Edit: I should probably clarify my above statement to say that I would not own a street bike in California again. I would definitely look at a track only one though. Then again, it'd take an obnoxious amount of money to get me to even consider living there again....:D
 

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Vash said:
Well and the medical bills :)
The views and comments expressed by Vash are based solely on his many many many MANY times of crashing. Some of us can keep the handlebars top-side.

:twofinger



I agree completely... you are no better off with an enduro than a streetbike.

You could always try a bike such as the Suzuki GS500. I had a friend who started out on one of those... fun enough so you dont get bored, low enough powered so you dont make mistakes and get hurt as easily.

And 3 finaly words... gear, gear, gear.
 

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Sorry bro, bikes are not as safe as cars. They got two wheels and they fall over. Cage drivers look right at you before pulling out in front of you. What would be a minor fender bender ussually results in an ambulance ride. Thats part of the game, so you gotta be prepared, ride like everyone is out to kill you (it doesnt matter whos fault it is, it is still going to hurt you more), and wear your gear for when statistics catch up with you.

But thats not to say that its not a damn fun past time..
 

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MSF = great choice, that will teach you lots and keep you from having to take the ride test at the DMV for your license, and you will automatically test for an M1 license.

Do you live/work IN San Francisco, or just nearby? There is a TON of motorcycle parking in the downtown area of SF, but every time I went by it, it was PACKED. City riding can be a little insane, but at least you can lane split.

As for bikes, honestly? When you take the MSF, you will learn on a 250cc cruiser, which has less pull than a sportbike with the same engine size. Talk with your instructor, tell him/her what you are looking for and ask for some ideas, then go sit on some bikes at dealerships.
 

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A small-medium sized enduro would be cool to learn on. If a cage crashes or cuts you off and you have to go in the median (the grassy ones, not the concrete ones) then it's no problem. Plus they are easier to learn on in my opinion than a crotch rocket, and they hold their fun factor longer, again IMO.

Good luck.



-M-
 

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Good luck, I am sort of in your same boat -- big city and a bike. Trying to see if it is worth it...off to check out the Suzuki GS500.
 
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