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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
While assisting my gf in applying for a personal health insurance policy to cover the interim period on her new job, I encountered the question attatched.


Sounds like they are just looking for a reason to decline coverage. Fortunately, she can answer no, since she has never DRIVEN a bike, only been a passenger.

Has anyone here actually been declined coverage because of their involvement in motorcycling? Has anyone had a claim denied because the injuries happened while involved in a high risk activity?
 

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S370HSSV 0773H
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That is messed up. I've never had that question aked on any applications. It does sound a bit like a disqualifier question.
 

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Best ET 7.77 @ 186mph
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never been asked that question but...

when I hit that deer ...my regular health insurance (which is primary) tried to deny the hospital exam and tests claim... because of what I dont' recall.... but something to do with it being bike related.... but thank goodness Progressive knew their shit and told them that because my accident was due to circumstances out of my control that they could NOT deny my coverage... and walla they paid their share and Progressive picked up the balance... (the progressive lady said "don't worry we'd make sure it's all taken care of no matter what but that regular health insurance policies are always trying to find loop holes to not pay out" )

E.
 

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S370HSSV 0773H
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yes i was asked that question and several others like it. it was not for excuse of denial or, as scott described, a "disqualifier question" but it was asked as a lifestyle charactization. my years of experience on two wheels didn't affect my rate but i would have had to pay a higher premium if i had been the operator of a bike for less than 2 years and pro-rated for X years after that and professional training is involved too.

there is a clause in my policy that deny's benefits if death or dismemberment comes from activities considered to be "high risk" such as skydiving and bungee jumping.
 

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THAT, my friends, is your "healthcare choice" at work!

It's fine and appropriate to rig the risk pool in most types of insurance. Healthcare isn't one of them. Wait till you try to get health insurance with a "pre-existing condition", have a child with some problems, or when you get older, being a higher risk just because you made it that far.
 

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Dad said:
...or when you get older, being a higher risk just because you made it that far.
at the rate i'm going, i won't have to worry about this. :rolleyes:
 

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monkey said:
there is a clause in my policy that deny's benefits if death or dismemberment comes from activities considered to be "high risk" such as skydiving and bungee jumping.
That is exactly the disqualifier I was referring to. Ok, so maybe they don't refuse to deal with you completely, but when you get hurt doing any one of those perfectly legal activities, they can just refuse to pay? Sounds like built in disqualifiers to me. Pretty smart on their part too, because they accepted you and let you pay into the system knowing full well they wouldn't pay out because of your "high risk" activities.
 

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spicersh said:
That is exactly the disqualifier I was referring to. Ok, so maybe they don't refuse to deal with you completely, but when you get hurt doing any one of those perfectly legal activities, they can just refuse to pay? Sounds like built in disqualifiers to me. Pretty smart on their part too, because they accepted you and let you pay into the system knowing full well they wouldn't pay out because of your "high risk" activities.
the folks i got will pay out but you have to pay more, a higher premium becuase of the degrees of risk. if i don't claim to be a skydiver and i die because i was skydiving, then yes, they can refuse to pay. just like car insurance. in MA, if you don't claim your wife as a driver of your vehicle and she totals your car, they can refuse to pay.
 
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