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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey guys, i'm new here and had a question about some bikes.

I've gotten my license already(whew), ridden dirt bikes quite a lot, and have ridden my friend's Kawasaki Z750S(I think thats what its called) which I got a good feel for. But I really don't know too much about bikes and was curious to which bike YOU preferred and why?

My options are cut down mainly by price, I'm not worried about power since I've ridden a bike before and felt comfortable.

So this is what I had in mind:

Honda CBR600RR
Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R
Yamaha YZF-R6
(Any others you have in mind)

Alright....so they all are around the same price and seem around the same power. But what im concerned with is mainly realibility and how long each one lasts. Do you like one over the other because its faster and/or because it sounds better? Also, is it cheaply made and is it like the "kia" of motorcycles (sorry kia). Stuff like that.

Oh and do i need to know of any problems any of the bikes that I mentioned above? For instance, does the ninja have any known problems or just something weird about it?

Thanks guys, really appreciate any feedback I get.
 

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Honda and Yamaha are probably the best. They are neck and neck in reliability, and engine life.

Side note----> Yamaha did help Toyota design their 4 cylinder engines, look how reliable they are.:D (celica, mr2 spyder, corolla, matrix)
 

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TMH, I am to understand this will be your FIRST m/c? I take if from your line "--ridden dirt bikes quite a lot, and have ridden my friend's Kawasaki Z750S---" as saying not really that familiar with street irons. Then PLEASE allow me to suggest that you get the above fancy bikes out of mind & start with a bike that is ideal for beginners. Do note I am not suggesting you buy a 125cc for dirt & ride it a season or that you buy a 250cc street irons.

Remember the sportbikes are basically street replicas of their road racers so you are looking at bikes with peaky engines, perfection in slipping the clutch is a must, the greatest of care in how the brakes are applied, to know there is a "on pipe" part in the bike where the power-plant simply seems to want to send the bike on like a rocket & often then a new rider will get into trouble as he was not prepared for it.

We have a saying being "not forgiving bikes in handeling or slow speeds" & that is a factor in sportbikes for after all they were designed for EXPERIENCED riders with the clip-ons that force a rider to lean forward, plus the help of the rear footrests being up higher & more to the rear, giving the rider better control in the bends at good paces yet not that easy to apply a foot to the pavement to correct the bike from falling at a next to nil pace. Oh yes in said incident the narrow clip-on bars are not that helpful in keeping the bike upright while wider one piece handlebars would have been the answer.

Oh you will hear of those that claim if you handle the bike properly it will be the best buy ever. Yet many of those are no longer riding as many of them went down with the bike to often & so costly to rebuild.

Remember if you accidently crash a sportbike at around 50 to 70mph, IF the frame is not damaged & same with the forks then the plastics & some other items like signal light, mirror, control lever & a few other things will come clost the 1/2 the price of the bike when new!!!!!

SO allow me to suggest the two 500cc vertical twins by both Suzuki & Kawsaki with regular riding positions, almost bullet proof power-plants that have a lovely mid-range power. These bikes can be riden without any sweat at slow speeds yet when the stop light goes green either bike will be faster off the stop then most cages & can scoot one up to 100mph.

Other good points are enitial costs are lower then sportbikes, insurance is lower & they offer better fuel milage while tyres are not as costly & do not wear off as quicikly as on a sportbike.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Hmmm interesting.

Thanks for the info, I'll take that into consideration.

But on a side note, when I mentioned I've ridden my friends Z750S I didn't just mean a little. He's actually quite an experianced rider and gave me tips on what to do in an example situation. For instance, this may sound kinda stupid and simple, but it helped a lot. When he was turning a corner he wanted me to watch exactly how he leaned into it and I tried it but didnt understand till eventually I got the feeling down. Haha he also mentioned about what you said how the drivers out there are psycho.

And that Z750S can GO! Unfortunately I only got to ride it on the highway for a very short time as he followed in a car so I didn't get to "feel" the highway driving so much.

I think I'm more experianced than you think and I respect the road and speed (driving my dad's 2000 540i manual is definitely respected power) and I feel getting a bike above 500cc is something that I can handle as well as would like more. I dont really have the money to buy a 500cc and than later on buy a more powerful bike :(

After all this, Smitty, since I see you have a valued opinion and respectable, do you still feel I should get a 500cc?
 

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Smitty has very good points, and I would listen to him over me. I too have a lot of dirt bike experience and I think it has helped me considerably on the street. I don't find my bike as having to much power, in fact, I wish it had more. I am use to the front of my dirt bike being (or wanting to) be up all the time. I don't get this on the R6, even at redline speed. If you have as much experience as you say you do, then take the bike out to a parking lot and practice at slow speeds. I think you will be able to handle it ok. Just don't get stupid.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
They seem like great bikes, my dad wants to get the K1200 RS, but for me theyre too expensive.
 

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TMH213 said:
They seem like great bikes, my dad wants to get the K1200 RS, but for me theyre too expensive.
The more I ride my bike (Bandit 600S), the less expensive BMW seems. On one hand, I really enjoy the performance and "quickness" of my bike. On the other, I find myself commuting more and joyriding less, at least for now. My wife also likes to go out riding with me (on her own bike), and she is not crazy about riding really fast. I see more "sport-touring" in my future than "sport", and the long-haul features of a BMW appeal to me more and more.

I am not in a position to drop a few grand for a beemer, which gives me some tome to consider the matter. I wish I could have a stable of different kinds of bikes to take one that appeals to me on a certain day. Too bad life doesn't work that way:crying:

Edit: I hope I did not cause too many people to go ROTFL when I put the words "Bandit 600" and "performance" together. The bike still has enough power to scare the crap out of me sometimes and my riding limitations are still not close to the bikes handling abilities. It is fast enough for me, so there :twofinger
 

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The 05 6XR just felt better to me. That was the main factor. Plus the titanium color is really sweet...

I was worried about not being able to see the all-digital guage very well during the day (in bright sunlight), but it's PERFECT.

The only thing that I don't like about the NINJA is that it only has one headlight on unless you turn on the brights. Some people flash me because they think I have a burned out light :finger: .... oh well.

All things considered, the 6xr was a great choice for me...
 

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You might want to consider the less race ready bikes such as the ZZR600, FZ6, and the F4i, oh yeah there is SV650 as well.

But somehow I dont think you are going to consider them. Out of your list, I would say that the honda and the kawi are the most reliable. The honda is abit harder to work on. But all are very good bikes. I dont want to be misquoted as bashing the R6.




Well, the R6 is abit of a squid magnet....
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Haha I know I'm gonna get smashed for saying this but......whats a squid? Or a squid magnet? :crying: :loser: :wtf:
 

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srgaskil said:
The only thing that I don't like about the NINJA is that it only has one headlight on unless you turn on the brights...
I've heard people say that's actually considered a safety bonus, whether intentional or not.

At night, two small headlights can mean two things to other road users:

1. You're on a bike, not far away.
2. You're in a cage a long way away.

If cage drivers, coming the other way, think you're the latter, they'll assume it's safe to overtake. BAM!!!:eek:
 

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Yea, I had the whole "Hey dude, your headlight is out" thing
dont worry about it. Not like you are ever going to see it :)
 

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Wow. I fancy myself a rather intelligent person, but that never occurred to me. It makes a lot of sense. I'll take the occasional "hey dude, your lights out" instead of being a spot on the pavement any day.

Someone asked what a SQUID was. I've seen a few definitions. There's a pretty good post over in the new member section about that...
http://sbw.sportbikes.com/showthread.php?s=&threadid=50881

Someone should post a sportbike terminology doc.
 

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HONDA

I also agree that the F4i will be more street/new rider friendly. (My F4i is my first bike.)

They are by no means slow (They are within 1-5 HP of almost any other 600.)

They also look just as sporty as many 600's, and the big thing I love is that the seat is a bit lower than most 600's. (On a GSXR 600 I was tiptoeing, and on my F4i I can firmly plant both feet on the ground at stops.)






 

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It's a great bike indeed. You should check them out to see how they feel to you. You've probably noticed, but the 6XR and (I think...) all the new CBRs (not the 4FIs) have the center tailpipe. I've been burned enough times where having that under-seat pipe is a nice-to-have. It may not be a big issue for you, but it's worth considering. Plus, it seems, any time you drop a bike, you drop it on the side with the pipe. I can't explain it, it just seems to happen. Replacing those aren't cheap. Anyway, just my :2cents:

Many factors to consider.... plus don't forget insurance. However, insurance quotes don't seem to change much as long as you stay in the same cc range.
 

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Bread and Butter

srgaskil said:
...Plus, it seems, any time you drop a bike, you drop it on the side with the pipe. I can't explain it, it just seems to happen...
You know how, when you drop a piece of buttered bread, it always seems to fall buttered-side-down?? It's Murphy's Law, right?

Murphy's Law at Work

The classic invocation of Murphy's Law in today's world is that of buttered toast falling and landing butter side down. It turns out that we, as bipeds, are doomed to forever have this happen.

Toast has a tendency to land butter side down because it does not have time to flip over. This spin is from the gravitational torque (twist) placed on the bread as it falls over the edge of a table (at about 1 meter (3 feet) high) cannot bring it to make a complete 360 degree flip. Now, if tables were taller (about 3 meters tall) this wouldn't be as much of a problem because the bread would have time flip before it hit the ground.

Why are tables only 1 meter tall? This has to do with our build as bipeds. It is convenient for us. Other animals can get much taller because they fall over less often. As bipeds we are notoriously unstable compared to, say a horse or elephant or whale. At taller than 3 meters (9 feet) if we fell we would shatter our heads. This is generally considered to be a 'bad' thing.

So because we can't reasonably be much taller than 2 meters (6 feet) before problems start occurring this places a maximum height of a table, and thus the tendency for bread to fall and land butter side down.

There are some ways to correct this.

1. Work from tables about 3 meters tall. This gives bread falling from such a height the time necessary to flip to butter side up. This was confirmed in a series of tests that showed that toast falling from normal tables landed butter side down 62% of the time, while landing from tables 8 feet up only landed butter side down 47% of the time.
2. Always put toast butter side down on the table. This implies a very clean table and non-stick surfaces with regards to butter, peanut butter, and jelly (also vegemite if you are from down under). As any parent knows, such a non-stick surface does not exist with regards to these surfaces.
3. Eat very small squares of toast (about 5cm (2 inches) on a side). When these flip over the side of the table, it takes less torque to get them to spin. There is an optimum sized bread for every height table.
4. Tie the toast butter side up to the back of a cat. The cat will always land on its feet and the butter side will be maintained. Note: this may cause the cat and toast to spin and form a perpetual motion machine.

Likely the most practical method is to minimize the time that gravity has to act and apply torque. To do this one must move the bread away from the edge and let it fall normally. Toast dropped from any height with no spin on it will tend to land in the same orientation that it was dropped from. In the case of a edge of a table this means getting the toast away from the edge by pushing it off the table. For a tray, one would move the tray rapidly down (faster than the toast was falling) and then to the side so the toast does not flip.

Face it, the toast will land butter side down more often than not, and Murphy works with the fundamental nature of our existance.
 
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