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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just recently purchased a 2002 GSX-R 1000 in great condition for a great price. I've never ridden a 1000 before, and have only been riding for about a year now, but I couldnt pass up the price. (Yeah its that low) I have ridden many 600s before, but never one of my own. For I had a zuki gs500 for my first bike. I realize that the 1000s are a much bigger bike, heavier, with very different suspension, gear ratios, etc. Not to mention the extremely sensitive throttle. But heres the kicker, I'm 6'4" 250lbs. All the other bikes make me look like a monkey riding a football.

I am a conservative rider, I dont like going blinding speeds, however, I have a tremendous respect for the bike's power.

My question is: Should I sell it off for profit and get a 600 and work my way back up? -or- Work with the 1000 slowly but surely and get used to it?

Basically, is it really THAT bad, to the point where I am facing inevitable death?
 

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Its all about self control and wether you feel comfortable with it or not. A person can start on R1 for a new bike and be just fine, most people wont be, but some will. You have riding experience, albeit not a whole lot, so you would be above the avereage curve. It all comes down to how you feel about the decision and your own feelings about your self control. Depending on what I paid for the bike and how much I stood to profit in the resale I might sell it, but it just comes down to you. If you decide to keep it, just take it very easy and treat it like you did you 500 when you first got it. Its going to take alot of getting use to I'll bet.

Good luck,
Sepias
 

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Personally, if you haven't learned how to really ride a sports bike yet, modern 600's are still better than 1000's in the learning curve. A gs500 is totally different than a modern 600, just as a modern 600 is totally different than 1000's. Your leaping 2 folds in and having 4x the power. If you know how to ride it good or don't really speed/take curves, then don't sweat it and ride the 1000.

1000's are more powerful and with modern bikes, they aren't that much heavier than 600's now (maybe 5-10 lbs different) but have 2x the power. They provide a harsher learning curve when leaning and doing twisties cause they provide soo much power and if you don't acclerated evenly during cornering, you'll break traction of the rear tire really easily. Which could lead to you crashing.

Its really up to you.
 

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Grow into it

By the sounds of your post you seem like a responsible rider. That being said, I think you're already on track to grow into the bike. I'd say keep it and increase your skills with it.

I will say this though - the more you ride a liter bike the more you'll probably not want to go any smaller than that. I know that's what's happened with me. I started off on a Honda CB 750, dropped down a few years later to a sport 6 and 4 years ago I picked up my 1100. I can't imagine riding anything smaller than a liter anymore.

Keep that bad boy - I've heard its a great bike! Good luck! :thumb:
 

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They are great bikes, but remember. He's jumping from a gs500 (an inline 2 engine) with a peak power of 47hp (35-40 bhp) to something that has 170+hp (165 bhp) I4 engine with a powerband that's very sick. Gixxer 1000's 2001+ are great bikes, but be warned, take it easy and slow still.
 

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The one thing that gets me is people thinking since they're of big stature, they need a 1000 over a 600.

A 1000 isn't physically any bigger than a 600. If it is, maybe by an inch or so. You probalby look more like a monkey fucking a football riding a GSXR over the GS500 due to a more extreme seating position. A race rep has to be the worst bike when it comes to comfort.

Anyway, you got the bike already, you have to make the call. If you want to play it safe, take it real easy for a while, and push yourself more and more by tiny amounts. If you feel like everytime you're out riding your litre bike that you're nervously spending too much time thinking "don't screw up, don't screw up," then you probably want to go down in power for a bit. You have to be comfortable with your bike to increase your skills.

Remember to keep all your brake & throttle inputs smoooth.
 

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JBaz said:
The gixxers are one of the most comfortable Race Replica bikes I think.
You know, I haven't ridden a race rep in a while(learned on them), since my last bike was a Katana, and now the VFR. I was at a dealer last weekend and sat on a R1. Not nearly as bad as I figured it would be. Knees were definitely more cramped than on my bike, but not too bad. I'm sure riding would be night and day compared to my Sherman tank though.
 

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jrc - you will hurt yourself just as bad on a 600 as on a 1000, just maybe a little quicker on the 1000. if you play it safe and ease your way into the bike, i see no reason why you cant keep the 1000.

plus 600's these days are pretty much the same speed 0-60 as liters, just liters have way more pull in the upper speeds, so i mean unless you plan on consistently running 100+ mph (i mean i know we all do it sometimes, but just not all the time!), i wouldnt worry about it. ive been on a gix1k, its a hell of a bike. be careful, have fun.
 

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GS 500 to GSXR 1000

Well, having ridden for a year, you at least have the basics. Given that you got such a good deal on the GSXR, it'd be a shame not to keep it. (How much did you pay for it anyway?)

You know what's really nuts- the GSXR is no heavier than 20 lbs more over your previous GS 500, yet has literally 4 TIMES the amount of rear wheel horsepower. Needless to say, this is going to be a radical step up for you.

Just be very careful. Throttle control will be of paramount importance. If you grab anywhere even close to the amount of throttle on a corner exit as you're used to on the 500, you'll be highsided right into the stratosphere.

Congratulations on the new ride, and best of luck to you.
 

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Be careful with cold tires! Friend just wend down on a 1K pulled out of his drive way... bout 15mph just grabbed a touch too much throttle wheel spun thrashed him and the bike.....
 

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Stick with the 1000 for yourself. As long as you have good throttle control you will be fine. Everyone that I have ever spoken to makes 1000's sound like something completely insane and out out of control, but to be honest with you I don't see what the big deal is. Don't get me wrong, they have far more power than a 600 but it it's not like you are going to lose control of the thing every time you hit the gas. You are also a perfect size for a 1000. Many people can't handle a 1000 because they are physically too small for the bike. I have a friend with a 1000 and his feet barely touch the ground. It is only a matter of time before he drops the bike at a stoplight because of an oil slick. I think the key term of this topic is "self control". I say stick with the 1000 and have fun. Just take it easy until you are used to it. Hope this help. :thumb:
 

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wheelie_steve said:
Stick with the 1000 for yourself. As long as you have good throttle control you will be fine. Everyone that I have ever spoken to makes 1000's sound like something completely insane and out out of control, but to be honest with you I don't see what the big deal is. Don't get me wrong, they have far more power than a 600 but it it's not like you are going to lose control of the thing every time you hit the gas. You are also a perfect size for a 1000. Many people can't handle a 1000 because they are physically too small for the bike. I have a friend with a 1000 and his feet barely touch the ground. It is only a matter of time before he drops the bike at a stoplight because of an oil slick. I think the key term of this topic is "self control". I say stick with the 1000 and have fun. Just take it easy until you are used to it. Hope this help. :thumb:
Respectfully disagree....

1000's are huge bikes expecially in the newer generations. They are not made for new riders. You may not see what the big deal is with them either because you haven't ridden one or... you have been riding bikes for a long time and they now are second nature to you. Think of when you first started riding don't care if you were 6 years old or 16 strap yourself to a machine with too much power and your going to get in trouble sooner or later. Not just the fact that these 1000's will pull 150mph with ease but they don't stop nearly fast enough for the inexperienced street rider. The dangers are much more severe on these 1000's. It is much easier to lose traction in the rear with 65+ftlbs of tq and 150+ hp on tap. You must be very careful and learn to respect them... over time.... not overnight.
 

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prob second nature to him, cause he has a gix750, and dont kid yourself thats pretty much a liter bike! of course that is if you have ever been on one, if you havent then you wouldnt understand what i mean. but im sure wheelie steve knows what im sayin!
 

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Z_Fanatic said:
what happens when you spin the wheel in straight line?
the tire smokes....lol

if your going slow and don't expect it then chances are "expecially for newbee" you won't be gong straing very long...
 

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Z_Fanatic said:
what happens when you spin the wheel in straight line?
we call those "burnouts" and rappers like to be posers on videos and do that with ducatis n shit....lol i love it

jk jk jk

u spin the wheel in a straight line, you will still slide out, i dont care who you are. it would have to be perfectly straight not to, and thats not gonna happen. so therefore, spinning back tire = sliding out into a "power slide" or something of the like. its very common, i have done it, especially when you are going slow and even slowly accelerating and hit any kind of small road debris or even if it is a little damp out (and obviously if its raining)
 

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rolling burnouts are not impossable they take some practice and great balance... and look really cool to IMO. I see lots of people stand up lean over the front a bit... ride the front brake, rip it up and drop the clutch fast..... to light up the rear.... the front break control will dictate speed.


P.S.
If you like this idea and it sounds cool... One recommendation.
Try it on your friends bike first..
J/K!
 

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mainerdr said:
Respectfully disagree....

1000's are huge bikes expecially in the newer generations. They are not made for new riders. You may not see what the big deal is with them either because you haven't ridden one or... you have been riding bikes for a long time and they now are second nature to you. Think of when you first started riding don't care if you were 6 years old or 16 strap yourself to a machine with too much power and your going to get in trouble sooner or later. Not just the fact that these 1000's will pull 150mph with ease but they don't stop nearly fast enough for the inexperienced street rider. The dangers are much more severe on these 1000's. It is much easier to lose traction in the rear with 65+ftlbs of tq and 150+ hp on tap. You must be very careful and learn to respect them... over time.... not overnight.

I am not saying I am a professional or anything, but that was my opinion on the 1000. I haven't been riding too long. I am now only 19 years old. I got my GSXR 750 when I was only 16! My parents took out a loan for me and I payed them back over a years time for the bike. I have ridden plenty 1000's, as well as a ducati 996, and I still don't think 1000's are that big of a deal. The power of a 1000 isn't exactly on tap. The gsxr750 and the 1000 have about the same low end power. It isn't until the 1000 gets into it's powerband that you have to worry about. It is all about self control and how well you learn. I have only been riding sportbikes for about 4 years now and I outride most of my older friends on the track, and am pretty good at stunting, and I have not had any real accident that were my fault. I began riding at a pretty early age on dirtbikes, maybe that has something to do with my opinion. For someone his size I think a 1000 would be fine as long as he controls himself. Rolling burnouts are fun!! Its takes some practice, but they are cool once you learn. When you get good you can start a rolling burnout and then start doing donuts on the bike without your feet on the ground. It is insane! It just is tricky to pull the bike out of the burnout without falling. It takes the most practice to stop the burnout or donuts because as soon as the wheel stops spinning the bike wants to go to the opposite side. Also known as a highside crash.
 

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wheelie_steve said:
I am not saying I am a professional or anything, but that was my opinion on the 1000. I haven't been riding too long. I am now only 19 years old. I got my GSXR 750 when I was only 16! My parents took out a loan for me and I payed them back over a years time for the bike. I have ridden plenty 1000's, as well as a ducati 996, and I still don't think 1000's are that big of a deal. The power of a 1000 isn't exactly on tap. The gsxr750 and the 1000 have about the same low end power. It isn't until the 1000 gets into it's powerband that you have to worry about. It is all about self control and how well you learn. I have only been riding sportbikes for about 4 years now and I outride most of my older friends on the track, and am pretty good at stunting, and I have not had any real accident that were my fault. I began riding at a pretty early age on dirtbikes, maybe that has something to do with my opinion. For someone his size I think a 1000 would be fine as long as he controls himself. Rolling burnouts are fun!! Its takes some practice, but they are cool once you learn. When you get good you can start a rolling burnout and then start doing donuts on the bike without your feet on the ground. It is insane! It just is tricky to pull the bike out of the burnout without falling. It takes the most practice to stop the burnout or donuts because as soon as the wheel stops spinning the bike wants to go to the opposite side. Also known as a highside crash.
I am very happy you enjoy the sport and are as passionate about it as I am. I cringe when I hear newbees getting big bikes. As you know some people can't walk and chew gum at the same time not good on a 1000cc bike, others pick it up like they have always been riding.... depends on the person.

Just one more comment about the above... I agree the 750 and 1000'cc bikes are similar on the bottom like 2-3.5K rpm.... after that there is a BIG difference... and I mean BIG. I had a 750 a few years ago... and I know my 750 wouldn't bring the front end up snapping the throttle around 5K/rpm my 10r will do it in multiple gears.... As for the difference IT IS HUGE... Look at the dyno graphs on the new 1000cc bikes.... at 8500 rpm it's putting out more HP than the 750 will max out at.... not to mention tons of tq.

If you have ridden 1000's and thought no big deal compared to your 750 you must have been only using 1/2 to 3/4 throttle.

I write this not be an @$$ but to ensure newbees that may be reading this that these bikes are available to anyone but does not mean that any person should be on it.

The most important thing is to be safe and have fun!
 
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