Sportbike World banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
659 Posts
You've either completely ignored the advice in the stickies in New Riders or you just didn't bother to read them.

first post

The 600's are all the same. None of them has any significant advantage over any of the others. It all comes down to personal preference - which one feels best to you. Your height does not exempt you from the advice on starter bikes though. In fact, a Ninja 500 will be much more comfortable for a tall rider than any of the 600's. Anyone who tells you that you need a bigger engine because you're tall is either trying to sell you one or is completely misinformed. You need to go read the stickies and then come back here and post "Hey guys, I've decided to take your advice and look for a good starter bike. Is this 500 I found on Craigslist a good buy?" Don't reply back stating that you don't want to outgrow your bike. Nobody here who has been riding for more than a couple years still has the same bike he/she started on, regardless of what it was.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,346 Posts
You've either completely ignored the advice in the stickies in New Riders or you just didn't bother to read them.

first post

The 600's are all the same. None of them has any significant advantage over any of the others. It all comes down to personal preference - which one feels best to you. Your height does not exempt you from the advice on starter bikes though. In fact, a Ninja 500 will be much more comfortable for a tall rider than any of the 600's. Anyone who tells you that you need a bigger engine because you're tall is either trying to sell you one or is completely misinformed. You need to go read the stickies and then come back here and post "Hey guys, I've decided to take your advice and look for a good starter bike. Is this 500 I found on Craigslist a good buy?" Don't reply back stating that you don't want to outgrow your bike. Nobody here who has been riding for more than a couple years still has the same bike he/she started on, regardless of what it was.
+1.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
You've either completely ignored the advice in the stickies in New Riders or you just didn't bother to read them.

first post

The 600's are all the same. None of them has any significant advantage over any of the others. It all comes down to personal preference - which one feels best to you. Your height does not exempt you from the advice on starter bikes though. In fact, a Ninja 500 will be much more comfortable for a tall rider than any of the 600's. Anyone who tells you that you need a bigger engine because you're tall is either trying to sell you one or is completely misinformed. You need to go read the stickies and then come back here and post "Hey guys, I've decided to take your advice and look for a good starter bike. Is this 500 I found on Craigslist a good buy?" Don't reply back stating that you don't want to outgrow your bike. Nobody here who has been riding for more than a couple years still has the same bike he/she started on, regardless of what it was.
The purpose of my post was to hear your opinions on the bikes. That's all. A friend of mine had a gsx-600 and said he almost went with a cbr600 but didn't because it felt too small for him. He is also 6'3. My first bike is a long time away and I'm just trying to collect information and hear opinions.
 

·
Strength and Honor
Joined
·
6,144 Posts
I sat on the latest 600RR and it feels smaller than my original VF500. So if that's what he's after, well then the only option is to go sit on lots and lots of bikes and restricting the choices to those you listed is unwise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,849 Posts
Did you worry about performance with your first bicycle or did you concern yourself more with LEARNING to ride it so you could get the damn training wheels off?? No disrespect intented but this situation is relative. Slow down, take your time and worry with the essentials like staying alive long enough to LEARN how to ride. These machine's obviously arent as forgiving as a bicycle. Most of the guys giving you advice above have been riding for a very long time, including myself. Alot of us are well seasoned riders and repeat the same shit over and over again so that some day maybe you will be. I am not flaming you by any stretch, only giving advice so my conscience is clear on the matter. Good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I sat on the latest 600RR and it feels smaller than my original VF500. So if that's what he's after, well then the only option is to go sit on lots and lots of bikes and restricting the choices to those you listed is unwise.
Thanks! I'll go by the dealership and have a seat on everything.
 

·
Strength and Honor
Joined
·
6,144 Posts
Thanks! I'll go by the dealership and have a seat on everything.
I misinterpreted your post prior to this. For whatever reason I thought you were asking for your friend. Suffice it to say, none of the supersports (ZX-6R, 600RR, GSXR, R6) are appropriate for a beginner :2cents:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
whats the big deal about buying a 600 for a starter bike anyways? I don't want to shell out the cash for a 250 and grow out of it then have to deal with selling it and possibly losing money on it. Why not just take it slow on a 600? I know plenty of people who have gone that route and are still breathing. And by no means am I a daredevil I have a good head on my shoulders I did way too much stupid shit back in highschool and learned the hard way but got it out of my system.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,449 Posts
Maybe if you'd read the stickies as suggested by mkeeney, you wouldn't have to ask that question.

But I guess a few of your friends are a good enough reason not to listen to us. After all, what do we know.

Aside from the fact that the people who have responded thus far probably have more collective experience on bikes than you do on your own two feet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,849 Posts
whats the big deal about buying a 600 for a starter bike anyways? I don't want to shell out the cash for a 250 and grow out of it then have to deal with selling it and possibly losing money on it. Why not just take it slow on a 600? I know plenty of people who have gone that route and are still breathing. And by no means am I a daredevil I have a good head on my shoulders I did way too much stupid shit back in highschool and learned the hard way but got it out of my system.

It's not about "Getting it out of your system". Its about making an intelligent decision. That is what we are ATTEMPTING to advise you on. Making a decision based on other people's actions is a pathetic excuse to get something you want and dont need. If you plan on following the leader perhaps you should look for the closest padded room before you end up getting someone like yourself or me killed. If not, make a well informed decision with things that you know very little about. Rest assured, you will be spared alot of problems in life this way.:2cents:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
It's not about "Getting it out of your system". Its about making an intelligent decision. That is what we are ATTEMPTING to advise you on. Making a decision based on other people's actions is a pathetic excuse to get something you want and dont need. If you plan on following the leader perhaps you should look for the closest padded room before you end up getting someone like yourself or me killed. If not, make a well informed decision with things that you know very little about. Rest assured, you will be spared alot of problems in life this way.:2cents:
You guys aren't giving me reasons on WHY not to get a 600. All you are saying is that its not an intelligent decision based on the fact that I'm a beginner while you know nothing else about me. I never once said I was going to BUY a 600, just been asking questions on why not to. Particularly after witnessing friends who have gone that route, took it slow and safe while gaining experience properly, and are now great riders. I know people who have died in car and motorcycle accidents from being irresponsible behind the wheel and I don't want to be another statistic like them. If you were to respond with an answer like: "The throttle on a 600 would be too sensitive in learning how to shift smoothly and properly." That would be a WORTHY explanation.

All the answers you guys give me are worthless (besides mkeeney). They contain no REAL information on why not to get a 600. You are basing your advice on unfortunate events formed by previous beginners who have proven to the world that THEY shouldn't have gone ape shit on a 600 starting off. Until I can get a laudable answer why not to get a 600, I will continue investing them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
867 Posts
Are you kidding me? The advice on this forum and in this thread is anything but worthless. They have told you where to look to find the answer to your question. People get tired of typing the same thing over and over to people who won't listen anyway. The main answer to your question is safety. It's your skin out there. Good luck with your riding and I hope you see the light before you buy. If you do things right in the beginning you might have a whole life time of riding and many, many bikes in the process. Why rush.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,849 Posts
You guys aren't giving me reasons on WHY not to get a 600. All you are saying is that its not an intelligent decision based on the fact that I'm a beginner while you know nothing else about me. I never once said I was going to BUY a 600, just been asking questions on why not to. Particularly after witnessing friends who have gone that route, took it slow and safe while gaining experience properly, and are now great riders. I know people who have died in car and motorcycle accidents from being irresponsible behind the wheel and I don't want to be another statistic like them. If you were to respond with an answer like: "The throttle on a 600 would be too sensitive in learning how to shift smoothly and properly." That would be a WORTHY explanation.

All the answers you guys give me are worthless (besides mkeeney). They contain no REAL information on why not to get a 600. You are basing your advice on unfortunate events formed by previous beginners who have proven to the world that THEY shouldn't have gone ape shit on a 600 starting off. Until I can get a laudable answer why not to get a 600, I will continue investing them.

:laughing:

Ok buddy, here's the deal. I do not need to know ANYTHING else other than you are totally green to this sport. Having a good head on your shoulders is completely irrelevant in this matter although it is commendable in general. You simply do not have the savvy at this time to know how to handle or react safely to a 600cc machine. This motorcycle will achieve its potential faster than you can process and react to it. You must gain knowledge and experience about anything before you can understand and efficiently work with it. Unfortunately you do not have 5 minutes to process and make a decision when you must on a motorcycle, time you simply do not have. The faster a machine accelerates the LESS time you have to react. Having said this how do you react at all much less in the blink of an eye to something you know nothing about?? I've given you the benefit of the doubt by giving you my time in explaining what I have learned. If you would be so kind and return the favor your transition to this sport will be a good one. Is this laudable and useful enough for you??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
:laughing:

Ok buddy, here's the deal. I do not need to know ANYTHING else other than you are totally green to this sport. Having a good head on your shoulders is completely irrelevant in this matter although it is commendable in general. You simply do not have the savvy at this time to know how to handle or react safely to a 600cc machine. This motorcycle will achieve its potential faster than you can process and react to it. You must gain knowledge and experience about anything before you can understand and efficiently work with it. Unfortunately you do not have 5 minutes to process and make a decision when you must on a motorcycle, time you simply do not have. The faster a machine accelerates the LESS time you have to react. Having said this how do you react at all much less in the blink of an eye to something you know nothing about?? I've given you the benefit of the doubt by giving you my time in explaining what I have learned. If you would be so kind and return the favor your transition to this sport will be a good one. Is this laudable and useful enough for you??

Yeah it is. Thanks!

:love:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
:laughing:

Ok buddy, here's the deal. I do not need to know ANYTHING else other than you are totally green to this sport. Having a good head on your shoulders is completely irrelevant in this matter although it is commendable in general. You simply do not have the savvy at this time to know how to handle or react safely to a 600cc machine. This motorcycle will achieve its potential faster than you can process and react to it. You must gain knowledge and experience about anything before you can understand and efficiently work with it. Unfortunately you do not have 5 minutes to process and make a decision when you must on a motorcycle, time you simply do not have. The faster a machine accelerates the LESS time you have to react. Having said this how do you react at all much less in the blink of an eye to something you know nothing about?? I've given you the benefit of the doubt by giving you my time in explaining what I have learned. If you would be so kind and return the favor your transition to this sport will be a good one. Is this laudable and useful enough for you??
But, any motorcycle will only accelerate as fast as you twist the throttle. Perhaps you just weren't that coordinated when you started out. There is no way to know. I've been reading numerous threads with posts from seemingly credible sources (+1000 post) that say they started on 600s, took it slow and safe, and did fine. Also a few who said they followed advice like yours, got a 250, and after a few weeks hated it cause it just wasn't fun enough. So I'm sticking to my guns here and I'm most likely gonna go with a used 600. I signed up for the MRT course which I've been told is a great beginners class this next weekend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I bought a 600 for my first bike and regretted it. But I didn’t look for the answers you’re looking for. I just hade a few friends to tell me what was up.:squid: Trust me these bikes are no joke. The throttle and brakes can be touchy. You won’t be able to take the bike full throttle for the longest time out of fear and lack of experience. Your just going to be to busy “taking it slow” for the first year to enjoy it. Improving you riding skills is also going to take twice as much effort.

I thank its funny your asking this question when all you have to do is Google it and find hundreds of people who have asked the same question. It sounds like you doubting you’re self. For me that would be a good enough answer to get a 250.

I have some more stories of people who bought big bikes for there first and are crying now like I was but you don’t need to here it. Trust me I’m still kicking my self and thanking god I still have all my fingers and toes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
slatedogg187 "...got a 250, and after a few weeks hated it cause it just wasn't fun enough."

wow thats sad. If you handed me something with two wheels and a engine I can find some type of fun on it.:D:burnout:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
slatedogg187 "...got a 250, and after a few weeks hated it cause it just wasn't fun enough."

wow thats sad. If you handed me something with two wheels and a engine I can find some type of fun on it.:D:burnout:
you quote me as if said that when really I said this is what others have told me and what I've read on this site. It seems to be half the people on here, beginners, intermediate riders, and long time experts, would agree that a 600 is too much for a beginner to start out on. The other half says a 600 would be the biggest they would go for a beginner. Each rider is different and will learn at a different pace from the next. You can apply this with just about any activity.

If anyone else reading this would be so kind to share with us your first bike experience, please do and we can all benefit.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,449 Posts
650 is actually as big as I'd go for a beginner. But I would strictly bypass the 600 supersports. Honda 600 F2/F3's were good starter bikes, though they are becoming a bit rare due to their age. My first bike was a 1992 CBR600F2. It hadn't been treated the best, and I was one of many people who had owned it. It was the first motorcycle I had ever ridden, and i did just fine. Never had a wreck on that bike. However, I saw 3 other people (after I sold it) with little or no experience wreck it. Eventually it ended up in a shed somewhere, no longer in working condition, due to the abuse. My second bike was my '05 GSX-R600 that I got after about a year of riding. Still took me a long time to get used to the power, and I can honestly say that I am a damn good rider when I'm at my best, but I haven't come close to being able to ride that bike to its maximum potential.

Get a 250. Or a 500. Or even an SV or Ninja 650 if you want something that's "not going to get boring."
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top