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Discussion Starter #1
I've been a lurker on this forum for a couple of months. I was introduced to this forum by "1percenter". He is a co-worker and a friend of mine.

1percenter (Cord) went out on a ride this morning with a group from another forum. I was invited, but I did not go. They were running up to Yarnell, northwest of Phoenix. He was on his CBR1000RR. The rest of this thread is just "The Shit I Heard".

They were dragging their knees going up the hill, (they frequently see speeds of 120+). One dude started drifting, overcompensated, and ran into Cord. They both went into the gaurdrail. Cord was killed instantly. The other dude died a few minutes later.

I don't know if that is a factual description of what happened, but that is the shit I heard. The reason that I'm posting this is because I know that Cord has been very active on this forum for the last couple of months, and it seemed appropriate that you guys know what's up.

Cord was like 27 years old, and just got married in July to his high school sweetheart (no kids...his 4 dogs were his children). He had a promissing career as a manager in a manufacturing company. He was very outspoken and had an opinion about everything. He was the kind of person who would rather die while "living life" than to live and watch life pass him by.

Cord spoke of death often, mostly because everyone said that he was going to kill himself on a motorcycle someday, so it wasn't suprising to get the call from his widow. (Oh, btw, his widow was on the ride with him and was a few minutes behind him when the accident happened. She got to the scene of the crash in time to watch the other dude die.) Cord wasn't affraid of death, and didn't want anyone to mourn his passing. His wishes were to be creamated, and have his ashes scattered in AZ, PA, and MA. Then, he wanted everyone to get together for a big "Cord's Dead" kegger/smoke-a-thon.

This is a seriously messed up "first post", and I do appologize for having to introduce myself this way. But, you know, I thought that it was important for everyone to hear what happened. This was a very sad event, but it was no tragedy. When 2 guys are traveling at 60 or 70 miles per hour over the posted speed limit and they wad themselves into a gaurdrail, it's just not tragic. Sad, yes. Tragic, no. Tragic is traveling 5 or 10 mph over the speed limit and you hit a patch of sand in the road and your front end washes out and you wad your bike into a gaurdrail. That's tragic.

So, now I get to go to work tomorrow and deal with the whole "dead co-worker/friend" thing. (Oh, btw, Cord's dad is the CEO of the corporation that owns the company that Cord and I work for. That adds a nice little flavor to the whole "dead co-worker thing".) Not only are we going to be mourning his loss, but we also have to figure out how to re-distribute his work to the rest of the management group...as well as talking to the vendors and customers that only Cord dealt with and rehashing the events of today over and over and over again. Then, I get to go to a funeral (which will be attended by my boss, his boss, and his boss too). Then I get to go to a big ass party because that's what Cord wanted us to do.

What I'm saying is that when you swing a leg over your ride, remember that the choices you make are going to effect others. Accidents happen, but it's the accidents that are avoidable that weigh heavy in the hearts of those who are left behind. Cord was a very good rider, always wore his gear (guys, he wore full leathers to work in the summer here in Phoenix EVERY DAY), and he kept his bikes in top working condition at all times. He was a student of the sport of motorcycling and spent a lot of time reading about the sport. In other words, Cord did everything right...except for that one thing that we all need to do if we want to live to ride another day: exhibit self control.

I chose not to ride with Cord today. That choice was made because I knew what those rides were like with that group. And I don't want to lose my driver's license, I don't want to go to jail, I don't want to wad my bike up and have to put it back together (again), I don't want to go to the hospital (again), and I really don't feel like dieing today. So I went on a "10 mph over the speed limit" ride with another bud today. We had a blast. Rode all over hell and back, had a nice lunch, rode back to his place and then I found out that our friend wadded himself into a gaurdrail today.

Today at lunch we talked about how cool it was waving at the cops as we rode past them, knowing that if we feel the need for speed, we can just sign up for a trackday and fix that problem real fast.

I lost a friend today. Do me a favor and think of how many people would be effected if you wadded your bike into a gaurdrail at 120 mph and how long it would take those people to recover from their loss. Then, the next time you swing your leg over your bike, remember those people.

1percenter...R.I.P. (ride in peace, dude)
 

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Thanks for the update, golf. Certainly 1% is a memorable character and sad to have seen him gone. The lesson here, of course is as you've pointed out: gear only goes so far to save your a$$. After that, its about personal responsibility and luck.

I'm certainly thankful he and his wife were not yet to the point of kids but wish the best for his wife in her future.
 

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That's quite a bummer. RIP, dude.

I can completely understand the riders who choose to stay off the street completely and do ALL their riding on track. Between the maniac inside and the maniacs in cages around, street riding is quite risky, for sure. That said, I don't feel I could afford the time and money required to abandon the streets completely.

To me, this comes down to finding a good balance between the level of excitement in life and the time to experience it. It is rare that one can live on the edge and still manage to survive to old age. But then, who wants to live a long life void of excitement? So we teeter-totter between the extremes, hoping that when we don't go too far either way. Our own Smitty is a rare, but still a great example how such balance can be accomplished!

Let's keep the rubber side down, guys!
 

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it makes me sick to my stomach everytime i hear a story like this. what makes it more difficult is that the guy was apparently a good rider and took steps to protect himself and that it was a mistake of another rider that took him out, a sadly familiar story.

when i hear these types of stories (all too often these days) it makes me seriously consider not riding on the street and/or riding only at a slow pace when on the street but fact is, you can get killed anywhere at anytime under any circumstances.

my thoughts and prayers go out to this fallen rider and his family.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
what makes it more difficult is that the guy was apparently a good rider and took steps to protect himself and that it was a mistake of another rider that took him out
I don't want to start a shit-throwing contest here, but I disagree. Both riders were highly skilled. Both riders were wearing their gear. But look closely at the circumstances of the crash: Dragging knees (on a public highway on a busy holiday weekend) and one dude's back end starts washing on him and that takes another dude out. Sounds to me like they were right on top of each other heading into a corner at high speed. No, they didn't take steps to protect themselves. I took steps to protect myself. I was invited to go on the ride, and I passed because I didn't want to #1)go to jail, #2)lose my license, #3)crash my bike, #4)go to the hospital, #5)die. I knew how those guys ride together, and I knew that the risk was high for one of these options to occure.

I like riding hard just like the next guy. There's nothing like the feeling you get when your grinding your pegs on the asphalt. Cord and I often talked about that cool feeling you get when you're leaned over so far that it feels like you're looking up to see through the corner. But I've had my share of mishaps, and I choose not to put myself in that situation anymore. My hard-riding is now reserved for a closed-course where they have sand pits and hay bails instead of cliff faces and gaurdrails. The risk is still there, but it goes down exponentially.

These guys were having a contest out there, and they both lost. Both were good riders, both were wearing "track-ready" gear, but both of them made a decision to have a contest on a public road, and the rest of us have to live with the results.

Can we send an ecard or something to his wife?
It would be best to send condolences to me at [email protected] and I will be sure to forward to his widow. Her name is Stephanie.
 

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Very unfortunate & will effect those related to him along with his friends. Unfortunately when a group ride hard that is not good for so often one can take down another & this was a prize example.

Reason I ride solo, bar the times I am passing some slower moving riders which is swift as I do not want to be tangled up with inexperienced riders or riders that ride beyond their ability & yes I know it is a challenge to others to ride at my pace or faster.I will NOT ride with others as I tend to question their ability in riding. Far to many are quite new to riding &/or are so often at the maximum of their ability when they should NOT be riding beyond 60% of their ability.

I have riden this way for 59 yrs which shows I am not riding to my maximum & have stayed upright all these yrs.
 

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golfdweeb said:
I don't want to start a shit-throwing contest here, but I disagree. Both riders were highly skilled. Both riders were wearing their gear. But look closely at the circumstances of the crash: Dragging knees (on a public highway on a busy holiday weekend) and one dude's back end starts washing on him and that takes another dude out. Sounds to me like they were right on top of each other heading into a corner at high speed. No, they didn't take steps to protect themselves. I took steps to protect myself. I was invited to go on the ride, and I passed because I didn't want to #1)go to jail, #2)lose my license, #3)crash my bike, #4)go to the hospital, #5)die. I knew how those guys ride together, and I knew that the risk was high for one of these options to occure.

I like riding hard just like the next guy. There's nothing like the feeling you get when your grinding your pegs on the asphalt. Cord and I often talked about that cool feeling you get when you're leaned over so far that it feels like you're looking up to see through the corner. But I've had my share of mishaps, and I choose not to put myself in that situation anymore. My hard-riding is now reserved for a closed-course where they have sand pits and hay bails instead of cliff faces and gaurdrails. The risk is still there, but it goes down exponentially.

These guys were having a contest out there, and they both lost. Both were good riders, both were wearing "track-ready" gear, but both of them made a decision to have a contest on a public road, and the rest of us have to live with the results.

dont get me wrong, i am in no way advocating riding like that. that sad news is that i too, like a lot of people, end up pushing too hard from time to time on the street when riding in a group. its easy to do. it was after one of those many fast rides whilst painting the mirrors of the rider in front of me that i said to myself "nows the time to dial it back on the street and go to a track"

riding on a track however is no guarantee either. that was the point of my post. even riding "10mph" over the speed limit is no guarantee although it certainly significantly reduces the chances of accident or severe injury.

regardless, no mudslinging was meant. its a sad story that hopefully we all can learn from.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Originally posted by uncledaddy regardless, no mudslinging was meant. its a sad story that hopefully we all can learn from. [/B]
No mudslinging seen. I'm just pissed at Cord for killing himself and I'm trying to make a point. If I seem like I'm on a soapbox or something, please bare in mind that I'm dealing with a pretty fucked up day. I don't mean to take it out on anyone, so if I look like I am, just remember that I'm not. It's just one of those days, man.
 

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Sorry to hear about the loss of your friend.

Even though I can't relate to being in your shoes right now, just hearing about it is very sad.

These are the things I think about as well when riding on the street, and I've found myself riding with a group that was "faster" than me. It's hard sometimes to exhibit that self-control. Congratulations on making the smart choice knowing how that group rides.
 
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