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Well im in the market for my first sport bike.. i am 19 5-10 and 140... have about 5000 cash to work with..... want newer bike low maintance good to learn on but not get tired of.... thanks for any input

spencer
 

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Here you go, Ninja 250R. Your local dealer should have a display one in February. Its $3500 brand new so spend the other $1500 on gear that makes you look sexy and some insurance.

 

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Who cares? Its quicker than most cars from a standstill and quick enough to get you into lots of trouble. Just the way I like it.
 

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Meh... Do you have any riding experience, even in the dirt? That's a lot of bike to start on. My F4i was my first bike and I really enjoyed learning on it; I think its a really easy bike to ride. Was... now its a miniature race bike and not quite as friendly anymore.

Get out to a dealer and take a look at some of these 600cc sportsters and see if that's really what you want to be on. Some people really want one then get scared of it when they have 100+ hp betwixt the legs.
 

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Your best bet is a Suzuki SV-650. A great "beginner" bike that you won't get tired of for a long time and fits right within your budget. (used)

Another even cheaper alternative would be a Ninja 500R. That even fits into your budget for a new one.
 

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At 140lbs you are actually really light so you will go very fast on almost anything.

The reason people recommend the 250r is these reasons:

- It makes learning easier (it still isn't that easy) and much more fun.

- The bike is light enough to learn the basic skills very well.

- It has an extremely high resale value. People often buy a used 250r and can make money when they resell it. This may change with the 2008, definitely get the 2008 because of the killer styling.

If you really want to have a lot more power than you can handle as a beginner, the 650r or SV650 is good choice like others mentioned.

The reasons they don't recommend SuperSports are the following:

- These are bikes made for people with many years riding experience. They have touchy clutches, much more torque, worse low-speed maneuvarability. A simple novice error made in shifting and throttle can kill you very quickly on one of these things.

- They are very expensive to repair and beginner's always drop the bikes. So you are pretty much guaranteed to lose quite a lot of money by purchasing and learning on a very expensive bike.

- New, young riders, on SuperSports tend to die a lot on them. A young, new rider on a SuperSport is the highest possible motorcycle risk category. This roughly means you will have a 5% chance of dying and a 25% chance of injury requiring hospitalization in your first year learning on one.

So ... it's really up to you.

Smartest Choice (Most Fun/Lowest Risk):
Go with an easier to control bike, take MSF, get all the right gear, and take your first year SLOW until you build up perfect skills, control, balance, traction understanding, cornering/center of mass management, and most importantly traffic awareness.

Highest Risk: Be a new rider, hop on a SuperSport, and run out into traffic.
 

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You forgot the killer insurance with a RR.
 

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If you can find an early-mid 90's CBR600 in good shape that's been well-maintained it will be an inexpensive bike that is great to learn on. They've got enough power to be entertaining, yet predictable. And they are fun in the twisties too.

EDIT: And my '92 600 was $49 every 6/mo for liability insurance.
 

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- New, young riders, on SuperSports tend to die a lot on them. A young, new rider on a SuperSport is the highest possible motorcycle risk category.
Just to point out something, the age bracket with the highest rate of death riding a motorcycle is actually 40-50 year olds. You have your mid-life crisis office working guy whose too air-headed to do a MSF safety course and buys the most expensive Harley at the local dealership, then ends up crashing in the first month. Most of the time, deaths are caused by error and poor judgment, not by stupidity or breaking the law.

You may think that kids on new bikes die a lot, but it's actually pretty low. Just it's publicized a lot more because kids tend to be doing something stupid, against the law.

Also, 600cc superbikes today have as much power, if not more, than the 1000cc bikes a decade ago. Theirs a race war going on between the manufacturers in HP and whose the fastest, but they tend to leave the learning curve up to the consumer with disastrous results.
 

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JBaz said:
...caused by error and poor judgment, not by stupidity...
:wtf:
 

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Just to point out something, the age bracket with the highest rate of death riding a motorcycle is actually 40-50 year olds. .... You may think that kids on new bikes die a lot, but it's actually pretty low.
Here is the table I was basing this on.

http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr091107.html


Number of Deaths Per 10,000 Motorcycles - 2005

Cruisers 5.7
Sport/Unclad Sport 10.7
Supersport 22.5
Touring 6.5
Other/Unknown 4.3

There were 1583 cruiser deaths with 2.7 MILLION cruisers registered.

There were 1128 supersport deaths with only 500k supersports.

Supersport motorcycles had the highest overall collision coverage losses among 2002-06 model bikes, almost 4 times higher than losses for touring motorcycles and more than 6 times higher than cruisers

I think there is also a by-age breakdown that showed half of the supersport wrecks were with really pretty young drivers.

So ya, you are right there are a few hundred more cruiser deaths ... but there are more than 5X as many cruisers.

The trend that I think people are talking about with the "old guys on harleys" is that there has been a dramatic increase in the number of deaths in that bike type/age group, but it is still no where near #1 ...

... #1 death machine on a per-rider chance to die is the Supersport. Per registered bike, in 2005, a supersport rider was 4X as likely to die on an SS then a cruiser.

Now... also, these numbers could be really screwed up because it's probably true that supersport people ride their bikes more than the people with 4 or 5 cruisers each parked in a garage ...

The best numbers were the Hurt study ones I believe that showed it by miles driven which is a lot more accurate, but it still showed similar, if outdated, trends.

Lets all hope the new NHTSA lady gets serious about these studies.

Bare in mind here, I love SS's, they are one of the most amazing things on the road today ... but it's misrepresenting reality if people think they aren't the highest risk vehicle to ride.

The only reason people get them is to go >150MPH ... and after spending all that money, people just can't say no to going 150MPH at least once in their life ... ;)

The problem is our highways are only engineering rated for 70MPH and a small bump in the road could send you to your maker ... ;)

Maybe we can all band together to get the speed limit and engineering reqs bumped to 150MPH <GRIN>
 

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SexieWASD said:
You forgot the killer insurance with a RR.
Agreed. Even with riding experience of over 2 years now, the insurance is still insane.
 

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I would reccomend a 500 or 650, something that you won't outgrow and will still be fun after a year of experience. A 650 twin, like the SV650 or Ninja 650R would be a good choice. Here are some of these for sale under 5000.00 in jacksonville, FL.

Suzuki SV 650
http://jacksonville.craigslist.org/mcy/460789701.html

Ninja 650R
http://jacksonville.craigslist.org/mcy/469402865.html

Not quite as quick, but still great choices are also the GS500F and EX500 Ninja. Here are a few of those for sale in the Jacksonville area as well:

Suzuki GS500F
http://jacksonville.craigslist.org/mcy/496543729.html

Kawasaki EX500 Ninja
http://jacksonville.craigslist.org/mcy/464355100.html

Buying one of these bikes would be a great idea, and the best part is that you would have money left to buy gear with.
 

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M/Cs are not like cars when it comes to learning, costs of purchase new or used, costs of parts, often costs of servicing, costs of tyres we burn off with such ease (the price of them still send you straggering), not in showing off, & there you are NOT 25 yrs of age so you will be paying at the nose ESPECILLY as you have a "death like" Sportbike. Tack on cost of protective riding gear from a crashhelmet all the way down to costly boots & more.

Mind you with NO experience -----well you will go down a number of times & the ABS plastics of the fairings cost a mint, not to menition what metal parts you will breaked off or ground through. So the MSF Course is the only way you have a chance of making it through a season without some mad prangs (accidents---that often are a m/c write-off) or without finding yourself struggling to stay alive in the hospital with severe injuries.

Why do m/c riders call a car or a truck a "Cage"-------is of because it is self-balanced with a maze of protection.
 

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I doubt anyone sane would "get bored" with a 250 ninjette, especially if there are some good twisties nearby. If boredom does occur, you could just ride in inclement weather (jk... not too much fun).

Cheap insurance, almost as quick as a bigger bike (at least in the turns).

Sure, I'm slightly biased as I ride a 250... but seriously, I'm about 230ish in gear, and the 250 is enough to leave me breathless at times. The newer models have better mid-range as well...

There's nothing wrong with starting bigger, but there's nothing wrong with starting on a 250 either. One doesn't learn to drive a car in a Viper...
 

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packtec said:
Here is the table I was basing this on.

http://www.iihs.org/news/rss/pr091107.html


Number of Deaths Per 10,000 Motorcycles - 2005

Cruisers 5.7
Sport/Unclad Sport 10.7
Supersport 22.5
Touring 6.5
Other/Unknown 4.3

There were 1583 cruiser deaths with 2.7 MILLION cruisers registered.

There were 1128 supersport deaths with only 500k supersports.

Supersport motorcycles had the highest overall collision coverage losses among 2002-06 model bikes, almost 4 times higher than losses for touring motorcycles and more than 6 times higher than cruisers

I think there is also a by-age breakdown that showed half of the supersport wrecks were with really pretty young drivers.

So ya, you are right there are a few hundred more cruiser deaths ... but there are more than 5X as many cruisers.

The trend that I think people are talking about with the "old guys on harleys" is that there has been a dramatic increase in the number of deaths in that bike type/age group, but it is still no where near #1 ...

... #1 death machine on a per-rider chance to die is the Supersport. Per registered bike, in 2005, a supersport rider was 4X as likely to die on an SS then a cruiser.

Now... also, these numbers could be really screwed up because it's probably true that supersport people ride their bikes more than the people with 4 or 5 cruisers each parked in a garage ...

The best numbers were the Hurt study ones I believe that showed it by miles driven which is a lot more accurate, but it still showed similar, if outdated, trends.

Lets all hope the new NHTSA lady gets serious about these studies.

Bare in mind here, I love SS's, they are one of the most amazing things on the road today ... but it's misrepresenting reality if people think they aren't the highest risk vehicle to ride.

The only reason people get them is to go >150MPH ... and after spending all that money, people just can't say no to going 150MPH at least once in their life ... ;)

The problem is our highways are only engineering rated for 70MPH and a small bump in the road could send you to your maker ... ;)

Maybe we can all band together to get the speed limit and engineering reqs bumped to 150MPH <GRIN>
There are some serious misconceptions in both of those studies.
The newest American Motorcyclist magazine (free for AMA members, EVERYONE should be a member) they pointed out that several bikes are mis-categorized, from putting v-twins in the supersport category to putting true Superbikes in the Touring category. Definitely worth the read for all of us.

And definitely start on a 500cc or smaller.
 
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