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Discussion Starter #1
Well, around income tax, I plan on going get my first bike.
A Suzuki GSXR 750.

Some of my friends who ride were telling me that Suzuki is easier to get financing for then Yamaha and Honda.

Any truth to this?
I'm asking because I got turned down by Yamaha already...

My credit score is in the upper 600's (I'm only 19).

They said my credit was great for my age, but since I just got my truck (an 08 Toyota Tundra) earlier this year, I had financed a good bit of money and they denied me.

However, I plan on putting down $2,000 on the GSXR, and I HEARD that Suzuki was easier to get financing for....and I'm frickin in love with the 750.

Any truth to this guys??

Thanks in advanced!!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
All the guys at the dealership and my friends all said that I'd outgrow the size of a 600...I'm 6'1 and sitting on a 600 i feel squished up.

The 750 feels right...and I have ridden one already, I love them.

But thanks for your reply.
 

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Strength and Honor
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All the guys at the dealership and my friends all said that I'd outgrow the size of a 600...I'm 6'1 and sitting on a 600 i feel squished up.

The 750 feels right...and I have ridden one already, I love them.

But thanks for your reply.
:laughing: :rolleyes:

I'll be kind and only directly answer your questions: No and no.
 

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All the guys at the dealership and my friends all said that I'd outgrow the size of a 600...I'm 6'1 and sitting on a 600 i feel squished up.

The 750 feels right...and I have ridden one already, I love them.

But thanks for your reply.
Any difference you feel in the ergos between the 600 and 750 are completely your imagination. Those bikes are as close to identical as two bikes of different models can get - same seat height, same overall height, same overall length, etc.

What I don't understand is when a guy makes the argument for a bike based on the desire to not outgrow a smaller model, why doesn't he then just jump to a 'Busa or ZX-14? You'll not outgrow either bike. Maybe you'll say that those are too big for a first bike, and you'd be right. That's also true for a 750 - it's too much bike for a beginner.

You'll go ahead and get the 750 if you can get financing though, and in a few months you'll go into a corner a little hotter than you're used to, get scared and stand it up, and then run it off in the ditch. Hopefully, you'll have enough sense to be wearing gear and not get hurt too badly. Then one of us will take it off your hands and fix it up for a track bike for less than 1/3 what you paid for it new. If you finance it, be sure you get gap insurance on your loan.
 

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To the original question:
All the dealerships finance thru the same company, HRS, so it makes absolutely no difference. The financing takes into account not only your credit score, but also your available income, and I'm guessing that is the reason you've been denied.

On the other question, don't get a new first bike. You are almost certain to drop it, probably more than once. 4-5k can get you a nice bike that's a few years used. That way your wallet gets hurt a great deal less when the plastic touches the ground.

And as for 750 being more comfortable than a 600? WTF they use the exact same frame. The bikes are virtually identical. This may be hard to believe, but any person who tells you they outgrew their 600 can't ride worth a shit. They are everybit as capable as a liter, and in the right circumstances, they are actually faster.
 

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#1

I really don't have anything to add to "mkeeney's" and "Vash's" already excellent responses.
 

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all these same dudes told me not to get a 600 a few weeks ago for my first bike. i would advise not to get a 750 for a first bike though. I'm 6'4 190ish 20 years old. the gixxers i sat on felt too small the handlebars are lower than is comfortable for me. same with r6. i almost went for a 2002 honda f4i maybe look into those. i went with a 05 zx6. 5,500 miles for $6000 its 636cc. sold my car, paid my car loan off and paid cash for my bike. i live in AZ though and its the same weather everyday here so we can ride year round. absolutely right about getting a used bike though. for sure your gonna drop it, i know i will eventually. Get a used 600, put aluminum frame sliders and just take it easy. oh and GET SOME GEAR! if you can afford to finance a 08 tacoma and 750 gixxer at 19, don't be cheap and get some nice leathers.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the input man. I think I'm going to end up getting a used bike.

Someone is selling an 06 YZF R6 with 5K miles for 5500. I think it's a pretty good deal, so I may look into that.
 

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yea sounds like a good deal. alot of stolen bikes use a loop hole way of getting clean titles on them so if you are going to buy the bike, take a picture of the seller and if he rejects fuck him.
 

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GSXR750guy, Good idea on the used bike. I had alot of experience on dirt bikes and small 250 bikes when I was younger. I got cocky during my first MSF class and dumped a small 125 bike. The instructors used me as an example, they informed us that it doesn't really matter what previous background you have with dirtbikes or short riding experiences. The best way to learn what a bike does when you mess up is by having it happen on their course. Small bike/low speeds/and very experienced instructors use others mistakes on the course to "prove" to you that riding is an experience that you can and will enjoy if you learn proper riding techniques. Long story short, please buy a used bike/take the MSF course for beginners and practice what you learn before hitting the main roadways.
Side stories: Had a buddy take the MSF class with me, he dumped the bike also. He thought he learned all the lessons he needed and went out and bought a new Buell 1200. Beautiful bike, until he was cruising at 95 MPH on a country road(Montana) and found some deer on the road. He forgot about his brakes and jumped over a ditch and dumped it in a field. Bike was 1 week old at that point.
Second Story: Another buddy same MSF course bought a new GSX600 and forgot to put his feet down when he stopped at a red light. After $800 of fairing repair it looked good again, right along with his temp tags on the bike. He had it for about 500 feet new.
Not saying that you will have this stuff happen, but it does happen.
 

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Get a used 600, put aluminum frame sliders and just take it easy. oh and GET SOME GEAR! if you can afford to finance a 08 tacoma and 750 gixxer at 19, don't be cheap and get some nice leathers.
This is another piece of erroneous advice, IMO. Aluminum sliders are not good for doing what they're supposed to do. You want Delrin plastic sliders from a quality provider (there are many). Reading and research can save you money, skin, and time if you look in the right places. I do, however, agree that sliders should be the first thing added to a bike (other than rider education and gear).

Please educate yourself fully before making costly decisions, its the mature thing to do. I am interested in seeing new riders continue the sport for the long haul, so read my posts with that perspective in mind.
 

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If they make them for your bike model, consider race rails. They are more expensive than frame sliders, but provide considerably more protection. With the load being spread between two points, they are much less likely to snap the bolt (which frame sliders often do).
Also consider sliders that are wide and rounded. You want something that will slide on the pavement, not catch. If it catches, it will make your bike tumble, in which case the damage will most likely be worse than not having a slider at all.
 

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Used Bike

The only problem with getting a used bike instead of new, is that I don't have the cash just yet in order to purchase either or. However, I find that it is a lot easier to finance a new bike than a used one, just due to the fact that the dealer is trying hard to make the sale. I would love to purchase a used bike rather than a new one, but just don't know any ways of financing it. I'm 21, and have an income large and stable enough to finance a purchase like this. If anyone could help solve this financial question please tell me.
 

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Strength and Honor
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The only problem with getting a used bike instead of new, is that I don't have the cash just yet in order to purchase either or. However, I find that it is a lot easier to finance a new bike than a used one, just due to the fact that the dealer is trying hard to make the sale. I would love to purchase a used bike rather than a new one, but just don't know any ways of financing it. I'm 21, and have an income large and stable enough to finance a purchase like this. If anyone could help solve this financial question please tell me.
There are two main options. Get a private loan from a bank or S&L, though they again may restrict the purchase to a new bike. Alternately, simply save the money in an interest-bearing account until you have the funds. IMO, a motorcycle is not a necessity so I'd personally never finance or get a loan for one.

Don't forget to figure in the cost for motorcycle gear and insurance. The gear will run ~$1k, insurance will vary too much for an estimate.
 

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Only 44 percent of affluent consumers bought in 2009 for personal luxuries by 10 percent in 2006, says Pam Danziger, president of Unity Marketing and author ofWOW Gold the commissioning of the Luxe Back in luxury. They were in WOW Gold on sale company. According to indulge Danziger, who scrimp and save in all areas of their life to aBuy WOW Gold brand items also snapped their wallets shut. Danziger has found that many of these so-called "intent" Shopper young adults aged 18 to 29 years old - the millennial generation - which do not abound yet been reached. That has not stopped from cultivating a desire for labels, thanks toWOW Power Leveling indulgent baby boomer parents. Unfortunately, millennials also hit hardest byAion Gold the recession. Although well-trained and digitally savvy, 37 percent of them are unemployed, the highest rate for this group in more than three decades after the Pew Research Center.
 
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