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Discussion Starter #1
I finally gave in and spent (way) more than I wanted to on a Shoei RF1000. Not that I got a bad deal, but I was lured into the purchase by the frequent times that I've had people tell me expensive helmets protect your head better (plus they're more comfy). The salesman swore on his life that the G-rating (hence protection) on a shoei or arai is a lot better than a cheaper, like $100, helmet.

I scrounged around the internet and found some contradictory info. about expensive being safter, but nothing conclusive. Anyway, I'm just wondering if my impulse was wrong, and I spent all that money just for a more comfortable helmet.
 

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ESanders2 said:
I finally gave in and spent (way) more than I wanted to on a Shoei RF1000. Not that I got a bad deal, but I was lured into the purchase by the frequent times that I've had people tell me expensive helmets protect your head better (plus they're more comfy). The salesman swore on his life that the G-rating (hence protection) on a shoei or arai is a lot better than a cheaper, like $100, helmet.

I scrounged around the internet and found some contradictory info. about expensive being safter, but nothing conclusive. Anyway, I'm just wondering if my impulse was wrong, and I spent all that money just for a more comfortable helmet.

IMHO...the top brand name lids are the way to go..I mean just look at the majority of pro racers..you see, Shoie, arai, suomy, okg, and if you happen to see some hjc's ect, it's that makers top of the line, and was prolly Custom made for that racer...

One of THE most important things is the Fit, a properly fit lid will protect you better in the bad crashes, especailly if the liners are top notch, which helps alot. In my case, there's only 3 helmets I'd buy, Arai, Shoie and Soumy, mainly cuzz they are the best fitting..:D
 

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Yup, I can endorse Suomy as well, when I dragged my head on the concrete, I had no clue until I got home and saw the damage. It's a good fit for me, or round heads, but wouldn't think it's too good for oval or peanut heads. It's DOT and BSI endorsed, not SNELL. And racers always get into argument about which rating is better. Personally, I think it's awesome, my helmet - top of the line Spec 1R was one of the lightest last year, I never feel wearing the helmet.


 

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Great Buy! I just bought that same model in flat black. After trying on a few brands and styles. That helmet fit me the best. Some fit well around my head, but weren't snug enough around the chin. For me, the RF1000 was just right.
 

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I've wondered this too. But I'm also unwilling to test it with my own noggin. The crash I had resulted in a sizeable chip of my helmet missing, which was enough for me to believe it was worth every penny.

I'll be back in the market for a Shoei when I get a new ride.
 

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don't know about safer per se, but if its comfortable you're more likely to wear it and will be paying attention more to riding than your hurting head.
 

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Motorcyclist did a very good story on helmets and found that the ones with softer liners (i.e. dot only) did a better job of stopping the energy of impacts from reaching the head than the harder (i.e. snell) liners. The helmet that did the best in the testing was also the least expensive in the test. The testing was all done using the same methods that the DOT uses and was all very scientific. The conclusion was that in all but the most severe collisions, meaning headon impact at 180+ mph, a DOT only helmet will offer better protection and less chance of any brain trauma. I do agree that the fit and finish of the more expensive helmets is far better than the cheap ones but at the cost of a little protection.
 

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I think that prolly the best way to find out which lids work, is to read, and or ask roadracers that have had their head bounce off the tarmac at 100+mph..and see what they say...;)


Test's are all fine and dandy, but the realworld crashing is possibly a tad different..
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The conclusion was that in all but the most severe collisions, meaning headon impact at 180+ mph, a DOT only helmet will offer better protection and less chance of any brain trauma. I do agree that the fit and finish of the more expensive helmets is far better than the cheap ones but at the cost of a little protection.
Most cheaper helmets are still DOT and Snell approved, however. And the idea that the cheap helmets, which are only DOT approved, but not Snell, have softer materials, isn't 100% true IMO. In other words, just because a helmet doesn't pass Snell doesn't mean it's of softer components and will absorb more energy with less Gs being transmitted to the head. A helmet could fail Snell for other reasons. But I agree that these soft helmets that they sell in Europe that can't pass the Snell tests definitely have advantages - the quality ones - over the harder Snell helmets here.
 

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You're going to love the rf1000. Or at least I did, its light, good aero's quiet, and comfy.
And its predecessor the rf900 handles 100mph spills quiet nicely (with a dull thud)
 

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Yes it is true that most helmets, cheap or costly, are both DOT and snell approved. The middle ground are the European standards. I believe, and tests confirm, that they offer the best comprimise. The main catch is that no racing organization and most track day providers will not accept a DOT only helmet. I personally crash tested a Shoei At 90mph, via highside, and was impressed by the damage done to the helmet vs. what I felt of the impact. The helmet had a softball sized "dimple" yet it felt as if my head just grazed the track. As a side note, Shoei refused to participate in the test even though the tests were done by the same people who the helmet makers pay to approve their helmets. The winner of the test was Z1R. They had 2 models tested and they finished 1st and 2nd based on the least amount of g-force transmitted to the head. The next best helmet, a Suomy, was a good ways behind.Take it for what it is.
 

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Hammer 4 said:
I think that prolly the best way to find out which lids work, is to read, and or ask roadracers that have had their head bounce off the tarmac at 100+mph..and see what they say...;)


Test's are all fine and dandy, but the realworld crashing is possibly a tad different..
Have your heard from any roadracers who specifically complained that a $150 lid did a crappy job of protecting their noggin? So suppose anyone who tried is dead, then there would be plenty of stories about "those other roadracers" who used a cheap lid and had terrible experience in a crash. The fact is, the "expensive=better protection" is a self perpetuating prophecy, because most racers buy into that mentality, and when they crash, sing praises to their superexpensive helmets.

There certainly are factors that weigh in on one's choice of a helmet, and comfort, noise level, graphics, and prestige, they all influence one's decision. The safety, however, seems to be more of a religious concept, rather than fact, which is exemplified by people scoffing at the "Motorcyclist" article about helmet tests.

I find it ironic that the sportbike riders who find Harley-Davidson owners' holier-than-thou attitude amusing, adopt the same stance when it comes to helmets.

Oh, and just for record, that Z1R helmet, praised so highly by "Motorcyclist", was rated crappily for its comfort and noise level by WebBikeWorld.com tester. You do get what you pay for, but it is not always what you think it is. :2cents:
 

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The safest helmet will be the one you can wear comfortably without distraction. If you're uncomfortable and trying to make some adjustment, or if there's too much noise, you won't have your full attention on riding. Try them all out and don't include or eliminate any based on any pre-conceived notions. All helmets will protect your head in minor crashes. In any impacts where you would actually be able to see a difference in helmets, your other injuries are probably going to kill you anyway. In general, you do get what you pay for in fit, materials, and comfort. My Arai Astral is noticeably quieter than my old HJC and more plush. It was worth the money, but I wouldn't have bought the Arai Quantum for any price because it didn't fit me right. Don't buy a helmet over the internet without trying it on at a dealer first.
 
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