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Discussion Starter #1
I've been trying to master figure 8's to take my test. But for the life of me i cant do them. I've also heard alot of people say that 8's are impossible on a sportbike. Are they really that hard to do, or do they just require practice?
 

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Tippmann said:
I've been trying to master figure 8's to take my test. But for the life of me i cant do them. I've also heard alot of people say that 8's are impossible on a sportbike. Are they really that hard to do, or do they just require practice?
Practice—and a few tricks:
  • keep a light touch on the bars
  • control speed with the clutch
  • look where you want to go, not where you are
  • counterweight—lean your upper body opposite the direction of the turn
Start by doing circles. To make a tight one (two parking spaces, 20ft or 6m diameter), you must be going slowly enough that you'll be slipping the clutch and controlling speed by modulating the clutch around the friction point. Keep your upper body loose and your grip on the bars relaxed. Turn your head and look across the circle you're following.

When you hit the steering stop, you must increase speed to keep from low-siding by letting out the clutch. Get comfortable making circles right on the steering stop and adjusting attitude with speed.

To tighten the circle, lean your upper body opposite the direction of the turn. This allows the motorcycle to lean over further, increasing the effective steering angle.

When you get comfortable with circles in each direction, try figure-8s. As you approach the transition, look across to the opposite side of the next circle, shift your body weight, and turn.
 

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counter-ballance and a controlled modulation of brake and clutch.
oh yea, and practice, practice, practice!! :D They aren't easy on a sportbike unless you've done them alot, thats why they throw them into the test. Good Luck!!!:D :D
 

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yeah like what they said.. counter-balance.. clutch/throttle control.. start big-go small..

now try doing it on Etch-a-Sketch.. thats harder
 

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slowrat said:
now try doing it on Etch-a-Sketch.. thats harder [/B]
man, now thats tough!!! LOL!!! :D
left hand is turning right, right hands turning left!!!ahhhhhhh!!!! apex!apex!apex!!!! :D
 

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counterweighting is definitely important in order to get the fig8 in the small area they want you to do it. but i had trouble with it at first because i was focusing so much on getting my weight to the outside. when i did it for my test, i just thought less about the counterweighting, and i aced it. clutch control is also very important, use second gear.
 

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What everyone has said, plus, look where you want to go(over your shoulder). If you look at the boundary line, you will almost always go over it.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
My main problem right now is that where i have to take my test, they just have a box made out of cones. There is no lines on the ground to follow. I have trouble visualizing(sp) where i need to go.
 

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No test for me yet...

YZF andy said:
counterweighting is definitely important in order to get the fig8 in the small area they want you to do it. but i had trouble with it at first because i was focusing so much on getting my weight to the outside. when i did it for my test, i just thought less about the counterweighting, and i aced it. clutch control is also very important, use second gear.
But...after reading this post, I went out today, and spent some quality time doing figure eights, as well as practiced my right and left turns (no preference BTW). 2nd works perfectly for me; I think the lean comes naturally. However, I rarely use brakes for a turn, almost never downshift,(except where necessary, i.e. bogging down on an uphill incline) and do the clutchless shifting where I can (saves wear and tear on brakes and tranny. lol! j/k..there are times when brakes come in handy!). For me it's mostly throttle control, and listening to, and feeling the needs of the machine. Sorry, old (car) habits die hard. :D
 

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cones

Hey, don't worry about cones instead of lines. Cones are easier to pick up in your peripheral vision. The point is, don't focus on the boundary, whatever it is. When you're making these tight low-speed turns, your chin should be on your shoulder looking at the exit of the turn. This feels odd, everybody wants to look at that front tire to see if it's going to make it within the boundary- don't do it. If you can make yourself look at the exit during these turns, you will soon find that they are easy. BTW, this technique is taught at MSF classes.

Steve
 
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