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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone on this board!

I own Honda CBR 600 F4, year 1999. I saw on FactoryPro website "Ignition Advance Rotor" - what performance improvements can be expected with this rotors? How can i know which rotor to buy ( + - degrees...). I don't care much about low end power however i would like to see some high revs improvement. How hard is it to install? Do i have to do any other modifications, like rejetting the carbs...? I never rode any other bike and i am not sure is my bike too twitchy on and off throttle, is there any way to smoothen this? So far i have installed full yoshimura exhaust, k&n filter and dynojet kit, and i am now looking for cheap mods to extract some extra power in high rpms. Any ideas, suggestions?

Please excuse my bad English :)

TIA :cheers:
 

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I just looked at the exact same thing for my bike earlier today. Apparently on the F4i it advances the ignition +4 degrees which supposedly makes it.. better/faster? I haven't been able to find much info on it but I'm interested in getting one myself. Factory Pro also has some sort of transmission part which makes shifting smoother and easier. I'd be interested in that as well if anyone has some info on it.
 

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But careful though - European spec bikes may have different timing advances - that product is intended for US spec bikes. I'd try to compare the published timing advance with that of a US bike. If you have access to a service manual for your specific bike, you should be able to look it up from there. Maybe someone from here could do likewise.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ignition timing ("F" mark) - 10° BTDC at idle
This is only thing i found about ignition timing in service manual...i don't know is it telling anything...
 

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10 degrees BTDC is a pretty hefty idle advance so I don't know but I'm guessing your bike has fixed timing, and no mechanical advance. If that's the case, and a US spec bike has the same timing, then the two are equal. If a US spec bike is running a 6 degree BTDC timing, then you're already there and don't need (and wouldn't want) the aftermarket rotor with a 4 degree advance.

It's common for manufacturers to vary the timing on the same model for different countries due to differences in available gas octane.
 

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You'll have to put it on a dyno to get the exact numbers, but advancing the ignition generates more power if you run higher octane fuel. However, you are risking pre ignition, which is bad for your engine
 

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You would think the euro version would have more advance than mine. In my case, I reckon the +4 degrees would be for racing with super high octane fuel; not for a street bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
How high octane gas should i run then? I use 95 octane for everyday riding, there is 98 octane availaible for some extra price, and at track i have 100 octane gas.

What is the worst thing that can happen? I don't want to blow my engine for a poni or two. It has about 40000 problem-free miles and i don't want to ruin that :)
Dyno test is unavailaible here (it is far and expensive)
 

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Dunno. If I did the mod I would probably be looking at using leaded Sunoco 110 race fuel which I've only seen at the track since it isn't street legal.
 

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Here's what I learned:

Mfg's generally set ignition timing conservatively, Honda most of all.
They do this to reduce emissions and to protect the engine from poor quality gas.

I've advanced the timing by one means or another on all my bikes (and cars) since '85.

The advancer may or may not make your motor run smoother or stronger, but you often pick up a little on top, and the motor seems to run a little smoother off idle. You won't harm your engine by installing this, and you will be cool running the gas you run now.....
 

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I emailed a guy from Factory Pro asking which octane I should use with the +4 advancer and he said 87 will work fine and that modern sportbikes aren't particularly prone to pre detonation. :huh: After doing some reading a few days ago I would have guessed something in the low 90s. The advanced timing would give the higher octane fuel enough time to burn to be effective. But I dunno.. I'll put one on the bike anyways. If the racer dudes use them then why not.
 

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Dynojet also has an ignition module that wires into a Power Commander. I remember reading somewhere that this plugin module isn't as good as the Factory Pro rotor. Does anyone know which is more beneficial and what some of the differences are aside from the obvious?
 

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OSUrid3r said:
Dynojet also has an ignition module that wires into a Power Commander. I remember reading somewhere that this plugin module isn't as good as the Factory Pro rotor. Does anyone know which is more beneficial and what some of the differences are aside from the obvious?
They're not even compatible. The Dynojet plug-in alters the ECU controlled ignition timing on a bike with solid state ignition. An ECU, if even present, wouldn't control the ignition timing on a bike with standard ignition.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Things have changed a bit since i posted here last time. I haven't got yet the rotor, still waiting for reply from guy on some other forum.

I got new HRC 1/6 throttle with kill switch for $100 and can't wait for it to arrive. Also spent 110$ on following: 4 new sparkplugs, oil filter, pair of race clip-ons, chan tool (not sure how you name it), chain, 2 front and 4 rear sprockets. luckily enough exactly in ratio i need. ebay rocks ;)

I will probaby get used race fairings, and maybe used hrc ecu, and that is where i will stop investing in this machine. (maybe a little bit more for engine work to accomodate higher rev limit)

Also, i will probably trade 8Ah battery for lighter one, and with all that mods i hope to bring the bike to 190kg wet weight.

If i get some extra money before the end of summer so i can get the new bike without selling this one, i will probably make it electric free (total loss ignition, not sure if that is tha name for it) and that will cut some weight too.
Argh, can't wait for spring to try my baby on track :love:

Right now this would be the stats of my bike:
mileage: 40 000 miles :crying:
power: have no idea, newer had it dynoed
weight: 196kg wet
suspension: front: resprung, with my custom valve work (not sure of any difference though hehe) with 3mm raised forks in triples, rear: ohlins triple shock fully extended to raise the rear for 1 inch. Bike currently look nose tucked down, has noticeably better turn in and out, however i had to add the steering damper
brakes: galfer waveys on front, oem master cilinder, reinforced brake lines. No fade, nice stopping power, nothing more to do here.
power mods: dynojet carb kit, k&n filter, complete yoshimura system with titanium can.
ground clearance: rearset adapters and customized exhaust hanger for maximum exhaust clearance. Also new suspension should make the bike less prone to scratching the asphalt.
transmission, -1 on front and +1 on rear, however i did that before my first visit to racetrack. I will add 3 more teeth on rear.

any suggestions are welcome :hello:
 

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Sounds like you're doing the same stuff I am. I started on brakes and Ohlins suspension, two of the best mods you can do before getting into the power stuff. Then my mods sort of spiraled out of control from there..

One thing that was a nice inexpensive upgrade was changing the front brake master cylinder to a radial one from a CBR 1000RR, Fireblade where you're from. If you're changing out to an HRC kill switch and throttle housing it should fit on the clipon just fine with plenty of room to place it where you want. The reserve is also much nicer to use than the F4i's which is a pain to get into. Pair that with some nice CRG or Pazzo levers and you've got some trick kit.

Don't know how fast you are but a good pair of race tires is very beneficial. An intermediate-level rider could probably get 3-4 track days out of a nice pair of Dunlop D208 GP-A's if you can get hold of some. Mine are takeoffs from a backup bike with only a 7 lap race on 'em.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I also though of radial master cilinder but decided not to spend any more money on brakes as current setup is working really nice, better to spend somewhere else.

I usually drive on used race tires with few laps on them. New par is 500-600$ and used in great condition can be had for less than 100$. Our only track has granite asphalt that has amazin traction (imagne this, fast driver's laps on wet are 3-4 seconds slower than dry laps) but they eat tires too :( I can get about 1, maybe2, day of supercorsa and racetec, however GP-A overheats and tears apart quickly on our track. On the ather hand, all fast rders here use GP209 (not sure of the compounds) becouse it is super durable and sticky, i haven't tried them yet becouse everyone tells they are very shaky.
 

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Cheese grater track eh? I take Mid-Ohio for granted since its nearly garage-floor smooth and apparently some turns are really tricky in the rain because of it. My M3's wore down very consistently and stuck like glue but some rubber was balling up in places since I forgot to change the tire pressure for the first two sessions and my suspension wasn't setup perfectly. Next season I'll spend the $50 to have the suspension guy set up my bike since now its pretty complicated over the stock stuff.

Speaking of suspension, I grabbed a pair of clipons off a CBR 1100xx Blackbird which mounts below the upper triple allowing me to drop the front forks 10-15mm (I forget how much) to get the correct geometry, along with raising the rear up of course. Although I haven't mounted them yet since I want to get them powder coated they should still have enough clearance to fit over the air intake covers when the steering is locked. I also have some tapered steering head bearings which are more rugged for track use but I haven't the tools to dig into the steering just yet. If you're interested I can try to dig up some specs but right now I only know that they're tapered :rolleyes:
 
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