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Hi ESanders2-

I'd rather put fresh lubricant on a warmed-up chain rather than a cold one for superior penetration. You'll still get "fling" either way.

~ Blue Jays ~
 

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1) "Does riding before chain lube help??" Yes, I think. I hear it's better to lube a warm chain than a cold one. I don't know how true that is but the biggest reason I lube after riding is so the lube has all night (usually) to drip off. I put some old cardboard under the chain to catch the drips.

2) "Is chain lube going to fling anyway?" Yes

I won't get into what I use for chain lube except that it's a pretty light oil. When I get home I usually wipe off the underside of my rear fender to get the flung oil off.
 

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In honesty I have been lubing chains since way back in 1946 & having some terrible results through the years with many, many different things to even an idea I passed on to Greeves, being put oil in the s/arm tube with a small adjustable tap that can be fully off or on to a very slow drip. Turned out to be useful in comp like enduros of several days.

In fact Mick Andrews copied from Greeves & passed that on to Ossa & then on to Yamaha.

Problem was it could be quite messy as we used light viscousities of oil in our trials.

There is an auto oilier one can purchase & if used correctly it does a super job. I simply have not purchased & installed three of them on my bikes. Believe it is called "Scotts Oiler".

Still I have not had oil fling on my bikes once I have lubed them with any of the on the shelf sprays. Mind you there is a trick.

You come in for your last run of the day, the chain is hot so lube the chain when hot, but do NOT sturate it. Leave the bike overnight & when you take off that is it -------- the lube has soaked in. If it does fling then you have applied to much. It is as simple as that.

Also in par with lubing the chain when it was hot NOW if you want to adjust the chain then with a cold chain THIS is the time to adjust.

So it is Adjust when COLD & LUBE while HOT. Sort of jives with change your oil when the motor is hot. Or another one I use being when hitting the twisties or bends GO IN SLOW & under control & COME OUT FAST.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks for the help.

I just think it would be a pain to clean the chain all off, then have to put on all my gear and go out riding (usually after I've finished washing the bike as well) before lubing the chain.

that's the other question I had - do you have to lube the chain after washing your bike?
 

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Usually after every other tank of gas or so, when I come back from a ride I pop the bike up on the rear stand and lube the chain while it's still hot. It's only when the chain starts to look a little dirty that I clean it, take the bike out for a few minutes without any lube then come back and lube the chain while it's warm.
 

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Hi All-

Unas_the_Slayer and I use a similar technique with regard to deciding when to lubricate the chain. Every other tank of gasoline sounds about right.

~ Blue Jays ~
 

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I keep a simple log book on the bikes I own/ride. It starts out withe a photo of the bike, S/N, cost of bike, colour & so much more.

On the regular pages is each time I fill up along with the milage, how much fuel, & what the trip meter read. Also any time I have laid a spanner to a bike, washed it, lubed the chain, adjusted the chain, tyres, chains, sprockets, etc.

So besides how the bike looks to me & whatever the milage tells me so much more along when was the last time I did this or that.

I picked up the above when I was racing comp bikes for factories over in the UK as they demanded the above & so much more monthly to even how I did in races. Even if I just practed a few hrs that had to be recorded.

It sounds more complicted on this post then it really is & I am amazed others do not do a thing for all it requires is a normal three leaf book & empty lines pages with some vertical ones I put in for Date, Milage, Fuel, etc.

Like I am amazed at those that do not check their air pressure till the bike is handeling lousy, or are way past the time to change the oil, or someone else has to point out to them that it looks like their chain is shot & a rusty mess
 

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Blue Jays said:
I'd rather put fresh lubricant on a warmed-up chain rather than a cold one for superior penetration.
With O-ring chaings you don't want the lubricant to penetrate anyway. Basically you're lubricating the external contact surfaces, and I don't suspect a warmed up chain would make any difference.

Also, try a teflon lubricant--they dont fling or collect debris.
 

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Blue Jays said:
Hi All-

Unas_the_Slayer and I use a similar technique with regard to deciding when to lubricate the chain. Every other tank of gasoline sounds about right.

~ Blue Jays ~
Hmm sounds good. Wanna lubricate my chain? Sorry, couldn't resist. :twofinger
 

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Leo it is simpler then you realize. Just normal 3-leaf book with lined paper. Now I only use the sheet to the right since I am right handed. Though I will put down things like NEXT OIL CHANGE AT 162,000 & underline it plus being at angle & in large print to possibly something else I need to NOT forget.

Naturally you have the photo on the left page, & possibly a more up to date photo of the bike or some important photo such as your steering head stabalizer, to a photo of the bike on its left side.

So the Right side is the make,model, date, S/N & things different like Kevlar lines, the can, or full exhaust system, possibly the cowling taking the place of the rear saddle & possibly a personal number you have scribbed inside of it, make of sliders, & such.

Who the bike was purchased from, actual cost, if you have extended warantee on the bike & other such things like the key number. You even have the back side if you want to put more infio on it.

Okay now the start of the first page starts offf with YEAR & yes you could be into 4th or 5th year before you sell the bike. I draw three vertical lines from top to bottom with a ruler. First one is for the DATE being month & day. second is for MILAGE, & last is amount of fuel for so often I record the total fuel used that day.

Really the rest can be almost blank or totally blank bar that I usually put down the total of the trip meter so I can always go back to pick out the average I am getting in fuel.

Also the room to put down if the bike was washed, chain lubed, tyre pressure taken as I do not do that every day, chain adjusted & any work I did on the bike. Also something that cought my attention in handeling or possibly a sound. Plus the new tyres, or chain & sprockets to whatever. Even record if I dropped the bike at nil speed in my driveway (yes I am a normal m/c rider that can make errors) & what might have happened.

On things like oil change, to chain lube, to chain adjusting along with a new tyre & such THESE I highlight for I can quickly spot them for quick reference.

After all I have three sportbikes I am riding so with the normal divider page I have one tabbed 600, another tabbed 929, & last tabbed 954 as info is recorded in for all three bikes.

Also find a decent m/c write-up on your bike & put that aside FOR when you go to offer your bike for sale someone will have a write-up of the bike back in '91 for even the model might not be knowen in '07. Your log-book is a history of you bike in how it was serviced.

Once you have it started it only requires a few minutes each day you rode or did something to the bike.

I remember selling a Triumph Tiger 100 in full Cafe Racer form & the chap was questionable about some work I had done on it, till I showed that part of the log book & how that very change took something like three changes till I was satisfied. Yes the sheets for the log book work went with the bike due to all the changes in the front forks, the change to Timkin roller thrust brgs in the steering head, the make of the clip-ons, make of rear-sets, make of the f/glass petrol tank, the Gireling shocks number along with the different types of springs, the data on the Amal carb like number of the slide, number of the needle, setting of the needle, various changes in the jets, the types of high lift cams & just so much more.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
i use the motul chain lube too, but it seems to fling all over the place, even when it sits overnight. my grey wheels are covered with black spots:crying:
 

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ESanders2 said:
i use the motul chain lube too, but it seems to fling all over the place, even when it sits overnight. my grey wheels are covered with black spots:crying:
After you've let it sit, wipe away the excess. :thumb:
 

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If chain grease spots are your main concern get a shaft drive BMW..
 
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