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Strength and Honor
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm buried but have quite a few threads to post, so please be patient :)

With an impending move, I took my last opportunity to borrow a friend's '05 R6 this past weekend. I had it for about 24 hours and rode it about 150mi. The only mods are that it was lowered (way down) and had a left-side frame slider.

Compared to my '84 500(cc) Interceptor, here were my notes:
1) Weight is significantly less. Probably obvious, but noteworthy since I think the lighter bike was easier to handle and from a learning perspective that is something that's pretty important.
2) Power was amazing, as we all know. I'm glad I'm experienced b/c this would have been too much for a newb to two wheels.
3) It was MORE comfortable than my 500 which has a more upright position. The reason is that more of the tank was between my legs, offering me more opportunity to grip and balance myself from front to back.
4) No petcock or ability to see into the tank. This was a bit disturbing since I don't typically trust electronic devices to that degree.
5) Distance I could turn the handlebars was far less than was available on my 500. Since its more aggressive and takes more aggressive tires, this was really a non-issue, though turning the 500 around in the garage was far simpler than the R6.
6) Brake level grabs (aka unintentional endos) were a non-issue. Perhaps that's because I practiced lots of late braking on my 500, but the brakes were FAR more powerful here. I still used most of my hand, none of the "one or two fingers" thing.

What I got out of the bike was a recognition that I'm past due to move up. I have no idea at what point I had been wringing the 500 out continuously enough to move on, but I know it was a while ago (maybe last season). I also learned the R6 isn't going to be too much for me, though that doesn't mean I have any interest in liters.

For new riders, I'm not sure how you know when its time to move on. I suppose the rule of thumb I'd suggest is that when you're constantly running the bike at the upper end of the tach and you can take curves pretty aggressively, you're close.

That said, I'm still a strong believer this is the wrong bike for a beginner. Period. Given the the GSXR and ZX6R are effectively the same in power, they would be unsuitable as well :2cents:
 

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You spelled it out for yourself. You should now be looking at a better performing bike such as the one you mentioned.

True I have had many bikes since back in '46 & often up to 1000cc or fast trotting 500cc, to screaming Yamaha RD/RZ0350, & on & on it goes.

Loved my Suzy GSXR-750 though the extreme lean forward had me straining to see the traffic while the Yamaha YZF 600r made it an easy bike around town or on the hwys.

Dumped the 750 for a Honda 929 & probably the best handeling bike I have ever owned plus lots of punch.

Comeing close to my last days of riding, due to age I scratched off the GSXR-1000 & went to a 954 in August of '04 when the Honda CBR1000 was on the floors ALL because I liked the 929.

To stay to long with one bike sort of droans into your blood that this is as far as you will go when in fact you should be upgrading to something better.

Some people buy a new car ever year or every two yrs & all they get is more & different buttons to fool around with while a m/cist obtains almost a different life in a new & better performing m/c,
 

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Just for giggles...sit on the new Kawi 600...pretty comfy, but then I like the aggresive seating position on the gixxer....:D

Also note...that you rode a "lowered" R6...so handleing will be much improved on a non lowered 600..
 

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Strength and Honor
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6,144 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Smitty said:
Some people buy a new car ever year or every two yrs & all they get is more & different buttons to fool around with while a m/cist obtains almost a different life in a hew & better performing m/c,
You summed in a sentence my thoughts after riding it. Its like starting anew again, but with lots of comfort for safety and control.

And you better not mean you're going to stop riding real soon :mad: If you do, you better still hang out here!
 

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Strength and Honor
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Discussion Starter #5
Other things I noted:
1) Shifting isn't really any different between the V4 and the inline. The slight exception was that the V4 didn't like being revved too low (i.e. going too slow in too high a gear). The inline was more forgiving.

2) Gear choice was effectively the same as what I currently use. Considering the power differences, I found this surprising.

3) The R6 was waaaaaay comfortable for a seat. Yummy :)
 

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keep us updated

Hey Kanwisch keep us posted on your findings.

My last bike was also a baby Interceptor and I know I don't have as recent or as strong an experience level as you but I feel like to some degree what I know of motorcyling and esp. sportbikes is similar because of that.;)

So let us know what you find out.:D ;)

Oh yeah - do you have more of a track focus or do you ride for the scenery/ experience?
 

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totaled my VF too

As I was thinking about your post and the fact that you totaled your Interceptor:eek: The question came to mind - How did it happen?

When I totaled mine it nearly broke my heart :crying: - But I'm over it now:D

Anyway, I was riding in rush hour traffic when brake fluid started spraying out of the sight glass for the front brake reservoir!:confused: :eek: It distracted me just long enough for me to miss the brake lights on the car in front of me. I grabbed a handful of brakes and endo'ed into a headbutt into the trunk of the car. The next thing I know I wake up standing in the middle of the freeway with cars stopped around me and people asking if I'm O.K. (I was wearing PPE/helmet so all I got was a bruise on my forehead and a slight concussion):p

Motoman74
 
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