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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Looking to get my first bike in the next few months and just looking for some solid feedback from experienced riders.

I know a lot of people say start out with a 250 or something similar but I'm not into riding a bike for 6 months and being bored so im thinking 600 and a big maybe for a 750. I really like the gsxr but not dead set on anything. This weekend ill be going to a few used dealerships and sitting on as many bikes as I can to get the feel.

No experience on a sport bike but I've ridden dirt bikes a few times but never owned one.

I am not the kind of person to be reckless and dangerous in any circumstance. I've got extensive driving behind many different standard cars so the idea if a clutch is not new to me.

Any and all help is appreciated.

Ps. Price range is right around 6 to 7k.
 

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Looking to get my first bike in the next few months and just looking for some solid feedback from experienced riders.

I know a lot of people say start out with a 250 or something similar but I'm not into riding a bike for 6 months and being bored so im thinking 600 and a big maybe for a 750. I really like the gsxr but not dead set on anything. This weekend ill be going to a few used dealerships and sitting on as many bikes as I can to get the feel.

No experience on a sport bike but I've ridden dirt bikes a few times but never owned one.

I am not the kind of person to be reckless and dangerous in any circumstance. I've got extensive driving behind many different standard cars so the idea if a clutch is not new to me.

Any and all help is appreciated.

Ps. Price range is right around 6 to 7k.
The 250s are great bikes, but a little light and made for lightweight riders. The 600s are fantastic, but remember that they are built to race. While this may sound appealing, it's a lightweight machine with over 100 rwhp. But it's better to learn how to handle a sportbike on one of the 600s than a 1000.

I'd suggest once you've gotten used to it that you go to a track day and take a class or at least some coaching. And get the chassis set for your weight. This way you can potentially avoid allowing yourself to learn many bad habits in riding one of these machines.
 

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Strength and Honor
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I'd suggest once you've gotten used to it that you go to a track day and take a class or at least some coaching. And get the chassis set for your weight. This way you can potentially avoid allowing yourself to learn many bad habits in riding one of these machines.
I'll try to one-up Dan, here. Take the Motorcycle Safety Foundation class NOW, it will save your life. Besides, it can get you most of the way to your M-class endorsement. Track day schools are ideal after having been on something for a couple of months and the learning is vastly accelerated with one of these.

Last thing, ride with gear.

None of the supersports will be different to you except in comfort so glad you're at least focusing on that. The nuances of the rest will simply be irrelevant for a new rider.
 

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I'll try to one-up Dan, here. Take the Motorcycle Safety Foundation class NOW, it will save your life. Besides, it can get you most of the way to your M-class endorsement. Track day schools are ideal after having been on something for a couple of months and the learning is vastly accelerated with one of these.

Last thing, ride with gear.

None of the supersports will be different to you except in comfort so glad you're at least focusing on that. The nuances of the rest will simply be irrelevant for a new rider.
I thought they had to do that just to get a license nowadays. I'm getting old :laughing:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Appreciate all the info guys. I'll be around the forum reading up on everything I can so I really know all the ins and out if riding (at least as far as reading will take me).
 

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Strength and Honor
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I thought they had to do that just to get a license nowadays. I'm getting old :laughing:
Hey you, get off my lawn!
 

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Hey you, get off my lawn!
:laughing:

Usually I have both trucks and a couple of motorcycles on mine. I need more parking if nothing else at my next house.


But yeah, YoungGun32; definitely do the MSF Basic Rider Course, and if they offer the MSF sportbike course do that as well. If not, look for the Experienced Rider Course after about a year.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Have to take the course down here in Texas to get your license but I will be looking into the advanced class too.
 

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The best riders I know tend to start on 250's or older bikes (like an early 80's classic). It's easier to learn how to maximize the capability of those bikes and actually push it, where if you're pushing a modern 600 you're probably a bad downshift or a throttle twitch away from eating $%&t.

Seriously, if you're really improving your skills and focusing on good technique a "less capable" bike will get you there quicker and less dead.

Ditto on the class though. good attitude.
 
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