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Sbninja,

When you called Kawasaki, at best all you did was contact their service help desk. They wouldn't have a clue what the chain guide was actually made of. You would have to talk to just the right guy at the factory in Japan, and somehow I rather doubt that anything like that took place. Of course, maDDtraPPer is right on the button when he indicates that such components are composites and are formulated using a 'blend' of materials to best handle the job.

The point here is whether or not the chain should 'always' be in contact with the swingarm guide. The guides do a terrific job of 'holding up' under the load, especially when an adequate amount of lubricant (chain lube) is involved. The key factor here is the vertical location of the swingarm pivot point relative to the drive chain. This creates an awkward decision for the Engineering Department. It would be very easy to just place the pivot right in the center, but they must also deal with the demands of optimum handling, so what's left is sometimes an unfortunate accommodation and less than ideal chain guide situation. On most bikes, the chain seldom touches the guide, while on others it may actually contact the guide much of the time. My whole point here was to discourage anyone from installing a smaller front sprocket without first checking on the chain-to-guide proximity and before making the 'problem' even worse. In these cases it may be wise to go larger on the rear sprocket and actually 'help' the chain guide situation.

I realize that sometimes these things are not easy to understand and that designs are often very complicated in nature. Add to that the all to real problem of dealing with the occasional unfortunate design goof and suddenly the 'real' scoop can indeed be hard to find.
 

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I didn't call Kawasaki on the telephone. I E-mailed them, the response was from technicians. Granted "rubber", "Plastic" could all be generic terms, but the response stated that it was made of plastic not rubber! . So take what you want from that.
Also the chain was designed to drag over the chain guide , according to the emailed response from kawasaki. I try to think of myself as an optimist, so I have to believe that the Emailed questions to kawasaki was answered(in a few day's) by someone of competent knowledge, if not, he or she would get the correct answer before responding!
It is easy to say that the answer came from a secretary at a help desk or maybe a "Janitor" fro that matter, anything to condirm your fact:rolleyes:

I received information from the source( in my opninion) and that's that. It really isn't a complicated argument, just what the part is made of, and what is the design purpose, it really isn't that big a mystery that some people here are making it out to be, pretty black and white , don't ya think:eek:
 

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Troyzx9r

The best route is indeed to go larger on the rear and leave the front as is. The problem with going smaller on the front sprocket is that it makes the chain drag over the front of the swing arm. This is already a problem with the ZX-9; so going up on the rear will actually reduce the effects. I have repaired a number of bikes where the drive chains have cut all the way through the rubber shield and proceeded to cut into the swingarm.

I'm always a little amused at all the guys trying to reduce the wear on their front tires by riding on only the rear. This greatly hastens the destruction of rod bearings and everything else in the drive train. It is also amusing to hear some guy claim that these bikes are 'designed' to do wheelies of stopies or whatever. It ain't so. Most of the examples I see are the ones that succeed in destroying their bikes in just a few months. I'll be rebuilding a number of them this winter.

If you can lift the front wheel with power alone, the damage should be minimal, as long as you don’t flip it over in the process, slam is down when panicking a bit, run the oil out of the oil pick-up, run off the road, or just making this a hobby, etc. I don’t recommend driving your car or truck on only two wheels either, for the very same reasons. Why do I object to the nonsense? Because I can hardly find time to do anything else these days. I much prefer doing creative work, engine building, customizing, and polishing, not rebuilding grenaded engines. Why spend thousands of dollars just to get back to where you started.
Really glad to see this said. It’s the same thing that these guys that spend all this money on these SXS and burry them in mud just to do it cause I guess in some way it’s supposed to be cool but I don’t see it. These machines arent cheap and I agree are only being destroyed by stuntin. Although guilty of doing wheelies myself I know the consequences and it’s worth it to me. So this is a learning situation for me. You said power wheeling is better than clutch up as far as being easier on the bike? I am only able to power wheelie and only in first. Very scary. I want to learn clutch ups. This is why I’m scouring the forums right now. trying to find confidence in the online community
 
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