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Not that I would ever let my bike get a scratch... Okay... there are several from a recent 'lay down'. What do you guys use to buff them out? Just regular automobile buffing compound or what? I won't have to replace some of the plastic if I can get the scratches out.
 

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Depends on how deep the scratches are, fella. Without looking, I can only give guidelines.

Wet sanding is what you have to do if the scratches go through the clear coat (if you have one) or if the scratch is deep in the paint. Use the lightest paper to try it first so you do not take off too much paint. Would suggest 2000 grit, a rubber sand block (not the hardware store variety, please!) and lots of H20.

If light scratches you can try hand compounding. The Dupont rubbing compound found in car care/parts stores works very well if you follow the directions and have patience (do not press too hard). Light pressure is all it takes.

Next use a hand glaze. Car parts stores carry McGuires No. 7 glaze, that will do it nicely. Then finish with wax. McGuire's No. 26 will let the paint breathe, or 3M show car wax.

If you know how to use an orbital polisher you can use a three or four step process to get it like glass, using the 3M or McGuire's products. Use the correct pad and use a random orbital polisher for the finishing steps (wax, maybe a finishing glaze), or all the steps, if you are not sure about using the orbital polisher. Again, light pressure, really just the weight of the machine is all you need. Too much and you go thru the paint.

I prefer 3M products, that is all I use to compound and finish the paint on my cars. But if you are looking at an auto parts store McGuire's is the best option. Try an auto body supply store, they usually carry 3M and McGuire's, or you can go online to 3M.com and click the icon for the car care center and order what you need.

That is probably overkill, I am used to detailing cars. But it should help.
 

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I just wanted to say that I agree with Fuster. I have about six years of detailing experience, and agree with everything he just told you. I have used many products and have been pleased with the results of 3M. I have provided links that show the b4 and after pics of a little wet sanding and buffing job that I performed. Good luck, and be patient.

http://www.finedetails.biz/b4.jpg

http://www.finedetails.biz/after.jpg
 

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Motorcycle Consumer News ran a comparison article of scratch removers last fall, I think it was November or Ocotober 2001.

3M was rated "Recommended". Meguiars was not. They found Turtle Wax scratch remover (the exact product title escapes me at the moment) to be one of the best bargains out there, price wise.

The problem they had with Meguiars is that it is priced way higher than most of its competitors, yet it did not do a correspondingly better job of removing scratches.

Although I like 3M and feel they have the best product line for paint care, if you cannot find it, and you don't mind spending the money, it would be ok to pick up Meguiar's. But According to the MCN article, there are some other consumer products for the average home owner that will work too.

I have said this before and will repeat it here: I have used Turtle Wax in the green bottle (not the silicone based wax) for about 30 years. No shit. Not for true detailing, but for when I am in a hurry or need to clean stuff off the paint. It is very durable and leaves an exceptional shine with very little effort. Like I said, not for serious detailing, but when little time is available, it works great.
 

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Fuster you're righ about the Turtle Wax, I've always used that stuff and always will.
 
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