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On the Buell website:

BUELL INTRODUCES XBRR PRODUCTION RACING MOTORCYCLE

Race-use-only bike brings Buell full circle

EAST TROY, Wis. -- (Monday, January 23, 2006) Erik Buell and company come full circle with the introduction of the 2007 Buell XBRR, a limited-edition production racing motorcycle designed exclusively for closed course competition. A spiritual successor to Buell’s first motorcycle, the 1983 RW750, the XBRR is poised to change the face of privateer racing with a professional-level, race-ready, production-based platform featuring top-shelf racing technology and typical Buell innovation.

“The XBRR combines the current culmination of Buell’s leading edge chassis technology and Harley-Davidson’s air-cooled V-Twin powertrain development in a platform designed by and developed for dedicated racers,” said Erik Buell, Chairman and Chief Technical Officer, Buell Motorcycle Company.

For Erik Buell, the XBRR marks a return to his racing roots. As a successful privateer road racer early in his career, Buell eventually built his own race bikes for the AMA's then-premier Formula 1 class. The RW750 was a hand-built race bike, and it became the first official Buell motorcycle. Two were produced before the AMA discontinued the class after 1985. Buell then translated his race-bred design principles into a line of successful street bikes leading up to the current XB platform.

The Buell XBRR features a modified XB Thunderstorm 1339cc (103.6mm bore x 79.4mm stroke) air/oil-cooled V-Twin motor rated at 150-hp (measured at the crankshaft). The engine is fed by a dual-downdraft 62mm throttle-body electronic fuel injection system and a ram-air intake system integrated with a new wind-tunnel developed carbon fiber fairing.

The XBRR is the first production Buell since the 1988-89 RR1200 to feature a full fairing. Its lightweight carbon design integrates ducts for cooling of the engine and oil cooler. The fairing was extensively wind tunnel tested to improve aerodynamics and reduce drag.

The XBRR chassis is the revolutionary XB design with fuel-in-the-frame and oil-in-the-swingarm, modified with a billet axle adjustment system and chain-drive to allow gearing changes for different race tracks. Suspension travel is managed by fully adjustable Ohlins units, with 43mm front forks and a remote-reservoir rear shock.

A new ZTL2 (Zero Torsional Load) eight-piston front caliper grabs a standard XB front rotor providing outstanding braking performance, but with less weight than conventional designs. New XBRR six-spoke magnesium wheels weigh 33 percent less than standard XB wheels.

Instruments include tachometer, indicator lamps for shift, power on and low oil pressure. The XBRR features a unique Buell Racing paint scheme.

Buell XBRR features:

1339cc (81.7 cid) Thunderstorm Powertrain:

4.080 inch (103.6 mm) bore and 3.125 inch (79.4mm) stroke
12.5:1 compression ratio
Dual 62 mm down-draft fuel-injection throttle bodies
WAVE-analyzed header and mass-centralized muffler
150+ peak engine horsepower at 8000 rpm (per SAE J607)
100 ft. lbs. peak engine torque at 6500 rpm (per SAE J607)
Black 6-Spoke Cast Magnesium Racing wheels:

Front: 3.5 inch (88.9mm) x 17 inch (431.8mm) wheel with 120/70R-17 tire
Rear: 5.5 inch (139.7mm) x 17 inch (431.8mm) wheel with 190/55R-17 tire
Buell ZTL2reversed rotor front brake with eight-piston Nissin caliper
Ram Air system integrated with full racing fairing
Carbon fiber bodywork
43mm Ohlins adjustable front suspension with inverted forks
Ohlins fully-adjustable rear suspension with coil-over monoshock with remote reservoir
55-degree lean angle (hard contact)
30.5-inch (775 mm) seat height
21-degree rake and 3.4-inch (86 mm) trail
Cast-aluminum swingarm with billet axle adjustment system

Center position wheelbase 52.8 inches (1341 mm)
Range wheelbase 51.8 – 53.8 inches (1315 mm – 1367 mm)
Buell Racing paint scheme
To accommodate eligibility in a wide variety of racing classes, an engine modification kit will be available to help conform the XBRR to a wide range of class regulations.
Buell will produce 50 XBRR motorcycles with a short initial run in late February and the balance made in April. U.S. MSRP is $30,995.

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Sweet!

I can't wait to see this thing at Daytona!
 

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Yeah but it will be a big flop just like Harleys Road racer was at Daytona some years ago..Duhammel road it that year and it kept breaking down...
I would actually buy a Harley if they made a sportbike to compete with the japanese 750--1000 cc class in stock form that would be reliable... sorry but to me BUELL is just a glorified Harley in japanese bodywork..

Just as harley did with thier sportbike NO STREET VERSION race track only...At $30,000 you should get an extra bike for parts that break..
 

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we'll see how it does. So far looks arent its strongpoint.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
LOL. Let the close-minded bashings begin.

At the very least, you should appreciate a US effort. At the most, you should be able to admire the unique thought put into this machine and the considerable efforts Erik's team has gone through simply to get to this point from the tuber days.

As a US citizen and a Buell owner (Yamaha for that matter), I'm wishing Erik great success with his new release this season.

Haters go on hating! :twofinger
 

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Sure I appritiate a US effort. And I appritiate the uniqness of the whole thing. What I dont appritiate is the HD power plant and tranny.
You want to see a truly unique american effort? Check out the C1 bike. A Dual crank, counter rotating V4. With two clutches, dry sump, a tranny that sits where the oil pan normally would. Some unique front end, rear end, and a carbon fiber frame. I can go on about that bike for hours...


But back to buells. Its nice to see them talk about competing in the field, we'll see how they do. I wish them all the best.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I LOVE the C1 bike, and want to see more local boys playing for sure.

And I agree that the looks of this thing isn't up to par on today's styling queues. But I'm willing to bet it's very slippery.

You can tell Erik designed the faring. It's very similar to his old 1200RR. That thing was the type of fugly that grew on you simply due to its uniqueness.

Are you coming tonight Vash?
 

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If he wants to race get a Yamaha or Honda... I cheered for Duhammel to win then I came to consider he was riding a Harley.

No its not harley bashing, its the truth as I know many people who would buy a true Harley sportbike if it was able to compete with the japanese bikes..But Harley cant get away from the cruiser image . If Harley designers would quit messing around with 40 yr old technology and or even a whole new engine design and put it in a sportbike frame. Erik Buell had an idea but i can honestly say " the Britten" v twin puts all others to shame..
I hope Erik the best..
well thats another story..
 

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Afraid not Dago. Not by choice I assure you. Well more like the conciquence of choices... anyways.
I'll forgive the bike its looks if it can perform.
 

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JeffNights said:
i may be silly, but it does say "production" yes?

do thy mean production just for the track or is this to made street-legal?
Track only.. and they only make a couple of hundred, just enough that they can race em.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Actually they are only making 30 this year. And they've all already been sold, each to a privateer team.

Vash, I asked Erik last night about the design of the faring and how it was derived. I specifically asked if it he took style/marketing-based approach to its design, or a purely functional one. He said that he put together several "ideas" that have proven to work over the years and combined them into a design he felt people would accept. It was obvious throughout the discussion that his mind was more focused on function than form. He also mentioned that the shape of the faring allows the bike to be "highly flickable at speeds."

This lead to a top discussion over its top speed. He wouldn't land on a specific number, but hinted at a 175-180 mph range.

It was a very interesting night. Buell's CFO, and 5 or 6 other top sales and engineer guys were there with Erik. And the best part was that they picked up the entire tab!
 

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dago said:
Actually they are only making 30 this year. And they've all already been sold, each to a privateer team.

Vash, I asked Erik last night about the design of the faring and how it was derived. I specifically asked if it he took style/marketing-based approach to its design, or a purely functional one. He said that he put together several "ideas" that have proven to work over the years and combined them into a design he felt people would accept. It was obvious throughout the discussion that his mind was more focused on function than form. He also mentioned that the shape of the faring allows the bike to be "highly flickable at speeds."

This lead to a top discussion over its top speed. He wouldn't land on a specific number, but hinted at a 175-180 mph range.

It was a very interesting night. Buell's CFO, and 5 or 6 other top sales and engineer guys were there with Erik. And the best part was that they picked up the entire tab!
First off. ARGGHHHHH. Now that I got that out of my system, I can side track abit.
The main disadvantage that bikes have when compared to cars, is aero. Bikes generate no downforce what so ever. Obviously at speeds that seriously hurts traction. Years ago, while motogp was still 500cc, yamaha tried to fix that, with some fairing designed that looked abit like a volture, it failed miserably.
What may work however is intelligent fins (Also it may not be legal for racing) As in a number of small wings, actuated by servos. They could be located in the "trunk" section, as well as the sides of the forks (Which are almost horizontal when the bike is leaned over). I'm envisioning a large peacock tail style wing in the trunk that would deploy when brakes are applied. It would have to deploy quickly, but it should potentially reduce the bikes tendancy to stoppie and improve braking (less so as the speed reduces, which would make for interesting operation). The forward set woudl help keep the front wheel from sliding out in a corner.
Of course difficulties are plenty. Finding a servo powerfull enough to actuate this wing (against over a ton of downforce) might be next to impossible. Hydraulics could do it, but thats a serious weight gain. The subframe might have to be strengthened as well.

What does that have to do with the buell? not a damn thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
i had the same problem in the beginning.

tell the guy you know that he needs to adjust his suspension and loose the stock Dunlop 207's. the Diablo Corsas help a TON.

feel free to contact me for a good suspansion setting chart.

he could have a cupped rear tire too. if you have a flat spot on the rear of a d207 and your suspension is not setup properly, you won't be able to break 115 without being scared out of your mind. i speak from experience.

the RR uses the exact same radial brake rim with an 8 piston design caliper (which will be avaliable for the masses) instead of the stock 4. it also uses the same chassis and geometry of the stock XB (with the exception of wheel base due to the chain conversion). we'll soon be able to see just how stable this setup is within extreme conditions.
 

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Why would the wheelbase change due to a chain conversion?

Speaking off why did they go to a chain anyway? I would guess that belts cant handle 150hp, but many buell advocates have disagreed with me.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Vash said:
Why would the wheelbase change due to a chain conversion?
It's due to the adjustment room you need when moving the wheel fore and aft to accomodate for the slack in the chain encountered between different rear sprocket sizes.

Vash said:
Speaking off why did they go to a chain anyway? I would guess that belts cant handle 150hp, but many buell advocates have disagreed with me. [/B]
Someone asked Erik about this too the other night. He replied that the only reason they're using a chain on the RR is to allow rear sprocket changes necessary for different tracks. Evidently, the new belts can handle 150. (?)

The older belts did not do well. The 2003 XB9's were bad about breaking. With the XB12 came a much better belt that they recommended you change every 15k miles. I changed mine at 12k, but never experienced a failure. The new belts are good for the life of the bike.
 

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Something that still needs consideration. Suppose a belt really can handle top HP bike (say in the 200hp range) would it be advantagious to make the switch? The belt itself should be lighter than the chain, but pulleys are heavier than sprockets, so I'm not sure what happens to unsprung mass.
A wider belt also creates some clearence issues, as anyone who ever tried to fit a wider tire on an HD will tell you.


On second thought, I'm not sure how well I buy the gearing change reason. A pulley isnt any harder to change than a conventional sprocket. Split sprockets are of course very quick to change (You dont need to take the wheel off) but I dont believe they are strong enough for track duty and thus only used on dirtbikes...

Sifting thru propoganda....
 
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