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Discussion Starter #1
i havent read anything about this yet on this forum so i wanted da exp., bikers responses on this subject of biking on bridges. i have spoken to both a veteran biker and a semi-noob who has already taken his motorcycle training course in sf and they both told me that when they ride on brigdes, esp. during windy times, that their bike will literally cross over about 2-3 lanes. When i heard this i was pretty scared about biking. i just wanted to know about this.
 

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Crosswinds my friend..... It can get hairy if you don’t know what your doing... It also depends on the bike’s weight.... If your on an 900lbs HD (or pushing it :laughing: ) it’s a different story...

I don’t know about 2-3 lanes thought.... sounds like that guy was out riding in that Isabel thing that just blew thru the northeast!!! I’ve ridden the overseas hwy to Key West, which is about 70% bridges for 120 miles, about 6 times now and only got pushed around once or twice enough for me to stop and take a break and let the wind die down :thumbs2:
 

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beemer boy -

Wind doesn't push you to the side, it makes you and the bike lean into the wind.

Very strong wind gusts cause you to tilt dramatically, and many people steer away from it to straighten the bike up in a survival reaction. This is probably the source of the 'I changed two lanes' without even realizing why.

Don't panic when it happens. Also, be alert that trucks and vans can shelter you from the wind - when you pass them or they pass you and you're no longer sheltered, you can get hit with the gust.

Off-topic : This is different from the bow-wave of a truck, and different yet from the turbulence of following a truck. Stay a good distance away from trucks or pass them quickly.

One last note about crissing bridges: 'singing' bridges with expanded metal decks (the surface has holes for stuff to drop through) are negotiated best by squaring the bike to the line of travel (in case there's a curve before the bridge), and cross with only a light grip or fingertip pressure on the bars. Let the front of the bike shimmy and shake if it wants to. If you grip hard and force the front to stay put, you will transmit all those forces to the rest of the bike and the bike will shake. I've never had a bike I owned show any signs of trouble on these bridges.

cdma2k
 

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cdma has done a better job then I would & covered more types of bridges, gusts & such. The bit about being blowen across 1 or two lanes could only be during a hurricane & even top heavy cages would have come next to toppling over & probably many would have stopped. In actual fact it sounds more like a fish story of a few yrs back & from the right side of the lane to the left side has now stretched into 1 or two lanes, but then if one was drunk ----- well anything could happen.
 

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cdma2000 said:
...when you pass them or they pass you and you're no longer sheltered, you can get hit with the gust.

Off-topic : This is different from the bow-wave of a truck, and different yet from the turbulence of following a truck. Stay a good distance away from trucks or pass them quickly.
It can happen to you anywhere you've been sheltered and leave that shelter. Like between hills, through thick trees, a row of buildings, etc. The first few times it happens to you can pucker the ol' sphincter if it catches you by surprise, but you'll quickly get used to it.

Speaking of trucks, I was out riding Sunday and decided to take a segment of interestate back home and got stuck behind a semi for a couple of miles. I dropped way back, but even at about a hundred yards I could feel the turbulence coming off it. Much worse than any cross-wind I've felt recently. Like cdma said, pass 'em quick, but not just because of the turbulence, but you never know if they know you are there.

Ride safe.
 

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hapmstr said:

Speaking of trucks, I was out riding Sunday and decided to take a segment of interestate back home and got stuck behind a semi for a couple of miles. I dropped way back, but even at about a hundred yards I could feel the turbulence coming off it. Much worse than any cross-wind I've felt recently. Like cdma said, pass 'em quick, but not just because of the turbulence, but you never know if they know you are there.

Ride safe.
And because its not uncommon for them to just blow a tire going down the freeway... I almost got my head taken off by a piece of flying tire one day following a truck on a 2 lane road :finger:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
thanks for the 411, how does the turbulence feel like, and any other type of "feelings" that you feel on bikes while riding?
 

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It sounds really scarry to ride in high winds, but just let the bike move around a bit and steer into the wind which like cdma said the bike pretty well does on it's own. It's really not that bad once you do it a few times. If your first experience is really high wind speed, pull over and take ten till it cools out a bit.


Good question though, but really, don't sweat it. It'll all e clear once you experience it.


Only thing you have to be ready to do is counter-steer into the wind.
 

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wantanaprilia said:
And because its not uncommon for them to just blow a tire going down the freeway...
Oh yeah, forgot to mention that one. It's bad enough being behind one in a car when that happens (I have). I can't imagine it on a bike...it flies everywhere and in big chunks, too. Worst part is, if it's a tire on the trailer that falls apart, the driver often doesn't even know it.
 
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