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Discussion Starter #1
It seems that most here respect all of the bike brands. Am I right? I dont see flaming against different bikes (a good thing, don't get out of hand now...)

When I see someone on any bike, be it Honda, Suzuki, Kawi, Yamaha, etc. I am usually just thinking to myself- "Nice bike.." I don't really know much about the differences in the technology, performance, and capabilities between an R6 and a ZX6 or a GXR and a CBR, but it just seems like every company makes a damn nice bike and whichever fits the best and feels good is your ride.

I got a 636 because it was the best used bike for the money in my area, but now I already feel pride in my ride. I think the styling on it just looks sick, and it just wants to rocket when you hit 8 grand on the tach. I have ridden with friends on an R6 and a Triumph 600 TT and I must say that the extra 36 cc's make a big difference off the line :twofinger .

Why do you like your own brand of motorcycle?

What are the main differences across brands in the same class? (I've heard that suzuki's have a more agressive riding position and hondas are more comfortable)

Are there any grudges between certain brands due to track results or other factors?

And finally, there is no doubt when I see a Ducati I am like DAMN and rubbernecking the other way. :D
 

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I picked my ride specifically and only because of its seating style. In the three models years preceeding the '05s I'd not sat on a single bike quite like the 636.

I will never get out of the 636 everything it has to offer and the same could be said for any supersport so the power/etc was totally irrelevant.

A minor secondary point was maintenance, which is why Ducati and non-Jap bikes didn't make the consideration list. Or so was my impression from online commentaries.
 

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Right now there aren't alot of differences in the different brands of Japanese bikes. The 600s are very evenly matched between the 5 brands as are the 1000s. Even moreso with the liter bikes. The Suzuki GSXR1000 is about 20lbs lighter than the other 3 but they are all 4 within 5-7 rwhp of each other.

The GSXR line is almost always the best track bike out of the box. That's not likely to change anytime soon. They have been that way for 2 decades now.

Honda and Kawasaki have typically got the edge on reliability with the four but they are all very reliable. Yamaha and Suzuki always push the light weight envelope so they tend to have a few more breakages/recalls but nothing very bad just some exceptions.

Ducatis are like Ferraris. Beautiful and high performance... when they are running. They take more maintanence and tend to break down a little more but still good bikes if you can afford it.
 

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Most has already been said, so this is just a few minor notes. Honda's are not that comfortable, at least not with the stock seat. Its like plywood with bubble wrap on it. Kawi's seem to have the most aggressive riding position, yamaha's the least. Gixxers feel smallest, hondas... well the seat hurts too much to think about anything else. Suzi seems to be the least reliable out of the 4 (still good), Honda's the most. Honda's are also the hardest to work on, while being the most newb friendly. Yami's tend to have the worst throttle responce, Suzi's have the best. Yami and Honda seem more oriented toward high corner speed, kawi is more toward late braking and fast exits. I think thats about all the generalizations I can think about.
To me the biggest advantage in sticking with the same brand is being familuar with propriatery systems, which eases maintanance.
 

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I don't have a brand loyalty, all my bike so far has been Yamaha, Suzuki, and now Honda. I guess Kawasaki is next? :D

But don't put me on the green one.

I am also liking the new Triumph Daytona 675, I will have to keep an eye on it to see if it turns out reliable as the Japanese counterparts. It seems to be the lightest and most agile of the middleweights.
 

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Actually I prefer working on Hondas as compared to Yamahas although this CBR has way too many fasteners to deal with much like the Yamahas I've worked on. The RC-51 was actually very easy to work on while my ex's YZF was a serious pain.

I should add though, I don't work on many stock bikes so that isn't something I have a real broad experience with.

Ducatis are the easiest I've seen but it's a damn good thing. :D
 

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In my case I used an Indian 45 flat head for street & then for flat tracking while I also had a 45 flat head HD that I also modified into Dirt Hill Climbing though before it was for normal riding.

Also in with two others & we opened up a m/c shop of British makes.

You can see whatever catches my attraction as a bike I want to RIDE then that is the bike & not fussy over maker. I have had Jawa, BMW & some other foreign makes to what are on the market now, not that BMW is a foreign bike.

Still to Vash's bit about the stock saddles on Honda as being plywood with bubble wrap, or something like that, I actually like the hard saddle of my Honda 929 & 954 compared to the softer saddle of my Yamaha YZF600r & when buying the 954 the head salesman was amazed when I turned down his hardly use custom made saddle (for half his cost) of his 954 , for he now had a CBR1000 mind you the 954 was his first bike in the sportclass he had ever owned & I think he was more in liking to Cruisers as milage on his 954 was beans all.
 

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Hi All-

There isn't a dog in the bunch between Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha these days. My taste typically runs towards Honda because I like the fit & finish of their bikes...and I could just as easily be swayed towards one of the others on a different day. It's a great time to be a motorcycle consumer if one is in the market!

~ Blue Jays ~
 

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Kawasaki

As has already been said, there isn't such a thing anymore as a bad Japanese bike.

I've always been a Kawasaki fan though. Primarily because they're engineering always places a heavy emphasis on building a strong engine, which appeals to my hot-rodder nature. They're fit and finish may not always be up to Honda standard, but you can always count on them having a stonking motor. I also feel that Kawasaki as a company has a bit more of an "in-your-face attitude"- they don't care as much about being politcally correct about their products.
 

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I'm on my 13th bike, and they've all been Kaws. They oughta give me a free one! I guess if my first bike had been a Honda, I would have only owned Hondas.

I know how Kaws' engineers think now, and it makes it easier to work on and set up the bike.
 

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Started on a Kwacka, so I guess my sentimental vote goes to them from here on out. That being said, with most jap bikes being relatively equal in quality and reliability, my decisions when buying future bikes will eventually come down to comfort above all else, then aesthetics.

If I didn't have to worry about $$$, I'd be on a Duc quicker than you could fill out the paperwork. :drool:
 

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the reason I like yamaha is mostly cosmetic, everything else was so close to the other bikes in the class that I got the one I liked the looks of the most and the one that also happened to be cheapest for me. On the other hand while I hate the way the new ZX10 looks I got to sit on and ride one the other day at the dealership (made sure the salesman knew that I wasn't in the market right now his response, "well when you are even if you buy used you gotta ride this thing sometime") that thing is probably the most comfortable new racer rep I have sat on yet, including the gsxr r1 and cbr so I think I have found my next bike (although maybe not for a few years)
 

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Between dirt and road, I have pretty much covered the spectrum of Japanese bikes. I was really looking into a Harley when getting back on the road, but could not justify a bike costing more than my car and being able to buy 3-4 Japanese bikes for the price.
I went with the CBRF4i for fit and finish and comfort. My wife wanted to ride along and the RR was a joke for seat comfort, although for $300 more a better value. Yeah I got the F4i banana foam seat every one jokes about, but they are not joking on the long rides when I am still ready to go and they have to STRETCH to get blood back in their cheeks. :p

I must admit the 636 keeps calling and them Ducs are works of art.
 

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Would you believe it, but the Honda people rarely see me like once ever two or three yrs, but Yamaha for sure & sometimes the Kwacker & Suzy shops. Still business is with Yamaha though two of my bike are Honda 929 & 954.

REASON is pretty well simple in that it takes so darn long to get to the Honda shop, crossing an antique & not to be trusted floating bridge that can be raised eight times a day for rich sail boat people, YET can get stuck. Tack in any automotive failure or automotive accident & again the bridge is tied up for anything from 1 to 3 or more hrs. In my case if I am headed norty into KELOWNA or the same if I am headed home for the Honda shop is on the north end of Kelowna & I live 40 some miles SOUTH not to mention said bridge PLUS the cages are dense & like to nudge up behind you at a RED stop light till they are touching the rear end of a cage or m/c with the latter NOT being my liking. Of interest this is the only way to travel South or North on Hwy 97 & there is NO alternative!!!!!

Yes I question why I ever bought the later 954. It is sort of like I do not have a BMW for it is part of a day to drive/ride to the BMW shop to look at what they offer, for parts, for service like a warantee matter, plus the worst traffic in B.C., so reason I do not have a BMW.
 

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I've owned just about every brand out there...use to race Yamaha's...back then I wouldn't own any other bike...

Re: sportbikes / track bikes...I've considered all of them, I went with Suzuki by process of elimination..the Yam R6 felt very small to me, I'm 6'2"..I liked the Kaw, both the 600, and 636, But, the top of the windscreen got in the way of my line of sight to the cluster, and the 04 600 Kaw had a seat that drove the family jewels into the gas tank...The Honda was nice, a tad heavy, but to upright for my liking...so I settled for the gixxer, it had a aggresive riding postion, and it fit me best, well as well as the newer Kaws did.

Am I brand loyal....I guess so, my gix is easy to work on, parts are available all over the place...Oh, I excluded Duc's cuzz ain't no way I could afford the maint on em...:D Plus I ride Only on the track, and it'd be a shame to toss one down road..
 

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I have to agree, Pre-2003 Hondas are a bit difficult to work on. The spark plugs are a bit hard to extract as oppose to the other two bikes I owned. Working on the rear brake can be extra work, since the muffler needs to be removed first. And the axle nut seems to be different compared to other makes, requires bigger torque wrench. But these things might have changed with the advent of RR. I think all newer bikes might be easier to work on the mechanical parts, but a bit more complex with electricals and EFIs.
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Thanks, I have already learned alot, and like I thought, it seems that the real, experienced riders have respect for all the bikes. I'm sure there are squids out there that are like, "F- Kawasaki," but all I can say is, "F- THEM, " hehe

I have been doing some basic repair and maintenence on my Zx6, and even though I am not any kind of mechanic, I must say that it has been quite reasonable to work on (and thank god for stands!). Maybe I'll change my mind if I ever get into the engine block :eek:

I wish I got my first bike earlier than at 26 so I could try and attain that much experience, but at least I have one now and I plan on riding for a long time. Maybe down the road when the wallet gets a little fatter I can keep an eye out for some deals on some of the other 600s used, do some work on them and start a little collection.

Oh and yes someday I WILL own a duck. I mean yeah its pricey, but hell, you get an over-the-top, sick, exotic race bike for the price of a new volkswagon bug.
 

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i'm a honda guy, got nothing else against other brands. BUT damn honda! move that damn clutch line outta the way of my instruments! Thats the only drawback i have had with my F4i.
 

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liquified: In comparison to cars, all bikes are easy to work on. All the peices are much lighter (you dont need cranes) you rarely have to take off big things, just to get to other things, you got ready access from all sides, there are fewer pieces all together. Harleys are a tad more difficult, because they dont seem to fit quiet right. Its like the difference between working on a chevy and a honda, you have lots of odd looking pieces that dont look like they go anywhere, where as on the jap bikes it seems more intuitive.
Unless you are doing some serious workd, you shouldnt have to get into the block, ever. There are bikes out there with over 100k miles on the engines, with no work. most bikes get totalled prior to hitting that mark. The ECU, while seemingly confusing, is actually pretty bulletproof, and easy to trouble shoot, so long as you dont have a mental phobia of all things wired.
 

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Vash said:
liquified: In comparison to cars, all bikes are easy to work on. All the peices are much lighter (you dont need cranes) you rarely have to take off big things, just to get to other things, you got ready access from all sides, there are fewer pieces all together. Harleys are a tad more difficult, because they dont seem to fit quiet right. Its like the difference between working on a chevy and a honda, you have lots of odd looking pieces that dont look like they go anywhere, where as on the jap bikes it seems more intuitive.
Unless you are doing some serious workd, you shouldnt have to get into the block, ever. There are bikes out there with over 100k miles on the engines, with no work. most bikes get totalled prior to hitting that mark. The ECU, while seemingly confusing, is actually pretty bulletproof, and easy to trouble shoot, so long as you dont have a mental phobia of all things wired.
I like how motorcycles require so few tools for maintainence. A set of T-handle socket and allen wrenches with some combination wrenches take care of most things other than the "special" tools.
 
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