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Hey people. Im a new rider and have 0 experience with Supersport bikes. I play around with dirtbikes here and there, but I have been on the verge of buying a true sportsbike, and the gas prices just made my urge a little stronger. I was going to start on a Kawi Ninja 250, but i cant find any and many have told me that i might want to start with a 600, since i would outgrow the 250 pretty quickly. I dont want to purchase a 250, and then be tired a year down the line. So the only battle for me was going for a new bike or used... All answers from experienced riders came out to be used. Justified by the "There are two types of riders" theory, I was convinced. Now there is a 2006 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R (636) and a 2003 Honda CBR 600rr... I would like to know which would be a more rider-friendly machine for daily (street) driving. Also where would the prices lie for the:
*2006 Kawasaki Ninja ZX-6R (636) - 15,500 miles
*2003 Honda CBR 600RR - 11,000 miles
 

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LAC_12, you need a turbo busa with NOS. Anything less, and you'll eventually outgrow it.
 

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if you guys cant answer the damn question no need to respond. you can flame a kid that comes here with no driving experience and wants to fast and furious it on his crotch rocket. but just cause yall ride and all doesn't make you the shit. I guess driving these 2 wheel'd machines are an ego boost to some. Everyones gotta start somewhere, I chose where I want to start, and like any beginner I naturally have questions... either use your experience to help me out by answering my inquiries or let me be.

I dont mean to get off on the wrong foot here, but I wont stand here and get flamed. I am intelligent enough to put together enough information to arrive at this conclusion. For many reasons that I have seen fit, I have come to these choices. Please help, or keep your negativity to yourself im not some punk kid that will end up becoming a statistic to raise your insurance policy.
 

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What makes you think you're such a mold breaker? You think you're the first person who's come here with zero experience asking which supersport is best for him? Not by a long shot. And the truth is, you aren't going to get any help around here with that attitude. If you're dead set on getting a 600 for your first bike, then you might as well forget anyone around here taking you seriously. Have fun raising my insurance rates.
 

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I'll take a stab at this:
if you guys cant answer the damn question no need to respond. you can flame a kid that comes here with no driving experience and wants to fast and furious it on his crotch rocket. but just cause yall ride and all doesn't make you the shit.
You'll have to excuse the lack of patience on the part of the other members. It's completely justified though. You're about the 10,000th new rider that has come on here saying "I don't want to get bored with a 250, so I'll just start on a 600." You obviously haven't read the stickies or the other threads in the new rider section. The fact that we ride does mean that we know a little bit about bikes though, and you should listen to us.

"The thing that new riders rarely understand is that pretty much every rider owns more than one bike in his life. You are not committed to a starter bike forever. Even if you bought that new RR, you will want something else in a couple of years. The magic in bikes like the Ninja 500 and 250 is that after their initial depreciation when new, they hardly depreciate at all. You can buy one of those bikes and sell it after a season for about the same price as you bought it. The depreciation on a starter bike is much less than the cost of the fairing, mirror, and turn signal on an RR that you'll mess up on your first drop." (I put this in quotes because I copied it from another post I made earlier. It's always the same.)

I guess driving these 2 wheel'd machines are an ego boost to some. Everyones gotta start somewhere, I chose where I want to start, and like any beginner I naturally have questions... either use your experience to help me out by answering my inquiries or let me be.
That's what they're doing. You've posted on a thread where the two popular 500's have already been recommended. If you've already decided where to start, why are you bothering to ask our opinion? The reason you're asking is because you know it's the wrong decision; you're just hoping for validation to do something you really shouldn't do.

I dont mean to get off on the wrong foot here, but I wont stand here and get flamed. I am intelligent enough to put together enough information to arrive at this conclusion. For many reasons that I have seen fit, I have come to these choices. Please help, or keep your negativity to yourself im not some punk kid that will end up becoming a statistic to raise your insurance policy.
Do you know why 15000 miles is considered high on a 600? Because so many of them are wrecked by new riders who decided they didn't want to "grow out of a 250 or 500." They're very capable of going well beyond that, but they seldom do.

Everyone says "I'm different, I'm smart, I'm careful, I'm responsible." If you really are smart and responsible, prove it by taking our advice and starting on a sensible starter bike.
 

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I have an '05 636 and am very seriously considering a 250 or 500 for my next purchase. Does that say something? If you're out to look cool, there are options but you have to be willing to look.

To directly answer your question, an '06 636 goes for ~5300 right now. Don't know on the 600RR. Note that my answer of your question is not my condoning the choice at all; see previous posts from regular members.
 

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Yea everyone here is right, no sane experienced rider is gonna recommend a supersport to any new street rider.

Every newb uses that don't wanna outgrow the bike BS but we already know that means you want a fast cool looking bike that others can awe over. Just so you know outgrowing a bike is actually a good thing, it means you've completely mastered the bike and have become an excellent rider on it. It also means you can sell it and get another bike to try out. Bikes are no different than cars and we know you aren't gonna have the same car you first owned as the last car you own, even if it never breaks down you WILL get another car before you die (assuming you live to old age) just because you want to try it.

So sorry we can't condone your choice, seek validation elsewhere.
 

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Im not seeking validation. My question was wht price they would go for? and which would be more rider friendly for the street?
You know nothing about me yet we can assume that Im some punk who will be going out on his crotch rocket and stepping up to everyone... the thing that pisses me off is that people can sit and type through one end of a screen like they are the shit and no one else can handle a 600. But when you speak to people face to face they dont have time to be hard. After months of asking around the common answer was 600 are alright starter bikes. Obviously a 500 or a 250 would be easier, but 600s are commonly done. It just so happens people can type up a paragraph worth of words saying "I am signing a death wish" by getting a 600. It does not correspond with the answers I am getting from plenty of riders on the street.

So id just appreciate if the two questions were answered by experienced bike riders and not my mom. If you truly care for my well being thank you, but I see fit to make this move at this time.
 

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LAC_12, I'm sorry the other guys came off as pretty harsh. I'm a new rider too so I know exactly where you're coming from, trust me. It's true that some people can start off on a 600 and be fine, but it is SO easy to get in over your head on something like that on your first bike.

Here's something to consider, right now with gas prices you can resell a 250 or 500 for as much as IF NOT MORE THAN you paid for it. So even if you get bored, you come out with cash in pocket towards your next bike!

On a 600 or bigger, it's so easy to accidentally give it too much throttle and have the bike be ripped out from under you. I've seen it happen.

These guys really do come off as harsh sometimes to people who want to start off on a supersport, but it's because they don't want people to get hurt.

I hope you take me seriously and not feel like I'm flaming you. Good luck and I hope you post again so we can hear what you think after I've gone on this little rant. :thumbs2:
 

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Savage - No offence, but please don't apologise for things other people say on this forum. We are all entitled to our opinions, whether harsh or otherwise.


Noob - My single biggest argument against a 600 as a starter is not so much about you killing yourself, but about you not learning to ride as well as you could have if you'd started smaller.

A small, docile bike allows your head to keep up with what's happening. Make a small input, it makes a small move and you've got time to process it.

600's are designed to a) go really fast in a straight line and b) turn on a dime. You make a small input on one of these bikes and it's going to respond before you've had time to register that, why yes, that is the pavement scraping on your helmet.

Small bikes are, generally, designed for a purpose; to enable new riders to get out there and learn to ride in a safe manner. Instead of talking to a few riders on the street, how about taking in the collective knowledge of bike manufacturers worldwide who make these bikes for a reason.
 

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i agree, me myself owning a 250 was the best choice i made, i actually tired to learn on a 600 and i about shit myself, the 250 is an easy bike and it will get you comfortable riding a bike, and they are cheap so when your ready to move up you wont be in debt 10grand :thumbs2:
 
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