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Discussion Starter #1
well i was in front of my house today practicing how to do stoppies, why? i dont know, i got board and figured i would start slow, an easy 5-10mph. i slowley rolled up and hit the front break, then, the back wheel came up , i think at least 2ft. man, it was thriling but fun.

now i just want to get to the point where i can hold the stoppie for a few seconds and bring the back wheel up to about a "2" O-clock position...

any pointers.?
 

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fauzt0 said:
stoppies are retarded...they ruin your forks and suspension...
you wanna be cool, learn to leaaaaaann
Do you have any idea what you are talking about or do you just like flaming newbies?


636: You arent going to ruin your forks by doing stoppies. What you are doing is the static stoppie (the wheel only comes up once you are stopped). Those are easier, but abit more dangerous, since you got no way out if you over shoot the brake effort. Try rolling the stoppie. You have to start at a higher speed (at least 30mph, later 50). Try getting some consistency before you work on height.
 

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Yeah I've actually heard that the so called static stoppies (where you're stopped) can mess up your forks, but the normal rolling ones don't.
 

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Niether one of them mess up the forks, they can mess up your shock, but not the forks. Hell I'll even explain where the myth comes from.

Wheelies. When you bring a wheelie too hard, the forks bottom out. Also all the oil is trying to rush from one chamber to another thru a very small hole. The hole cant flow enough oil, so the fork expiriences hydraulic lock. This is the time that the fork seals give out.
So people starts saying "Bottoming out forks ruins seals". Thats not true. Compressing forks too fast ruins seals. There is no danger in bottoming out a fork with straps in a bad of a truck, or in a stoppie. It happenes slow enough that oil can flow.
 

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fauzt0 said:
stoppies are retarded...they ruin your forks and suspension...
you wanna be cool, learn to leaaaaaann
Stoppies are the one trick that i encourage new guys to learn. It teaches people brake modulation. This helps when they are in a crisis situation they know how hard they can grab the brake and not flip over.
 

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thanks for the info, and sorry to sound condescending to the original poster...it was more of a joke.

I always thought that the weight and the pressure all in the front would ruin the forks.
learn something new every day :)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I dont want to ruin the forks or shocks, but i do wnat to do some trix's.

wheelies i think may be harder to learn, but the stoppies seem to be easier to do while going into a complete stop, it seems harder to do roling stoppies, its like if i hit the front break hard enough while going 30 mph, i might flip over easier...

am i wrong or not getting the point.
 

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fauzt:
The weight on the forks is the same as it would be under hard braking. They are designed to withstand it. The piece more likely to get hurt is the rear shock, from when the stoppie lands

636:
Rolling stoppies take more effort to bring up. You gotta get on the brakes hard at higher speed. And you gotta have good, warm tires. However a rolling stoppie can be saved from looping, a static one cannot.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
SO, by rolling and doing a rolling stoppie, what should i do? hit the front break hard, then let off so i can role with the back up? i dont know, its kind of frustrating not being able to do the stoppie due to fear of flipping the bike. :( i dont want to ruin it. but i do want to do sheelies and stoppies.
 

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WTF are sheelies?

Ok, lets get some stoppie theory. As you brake, the bikes weight transfers forward. The higher the rate of braking, the more the weight transfer. You front suspension will compress to absorb this weight, untill it bottoms out. at that point your rear tire will lift (Assuming good traction).
So in order to roll a stoppie, Get some speed (30 or so), get on the front brake a bit untill you feel the front start to dive, then progressivly increase the pressure untill you feel the rear wheel lift.

Make sure you are somewhere with good traction. In fact, I wouldnt do stoppies in the winter time on cold pavement. If you front tire locks up when the rear is in the air, you are done.
 

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Ok....here it is directly from Matt Blankstrom himself, who is a pro stunt rider for those who don't know. He rides with team 1096 and is one of the best stoppie riders in the world.

Here is the link for the full article on Super Streetbike, I will only post the basic stoppie section for those who are lazy! Stoppies aren't the easiest form of stunting, because when you wheelie and get past the balance point (bp), you tap your rear brake and it will come back down. In a stoppie, there is no recovery if you go past the bp, and you are looking at some hurting, because you will now be in front of the moving bike!
http://superstreetbike.com/stunt_howto/122_0444_hdt/

Originally written by Matt Blankstrom of Team 1096

No matter what you call 'em--stoppies, endos or even the lame-sounding "nose wheelies"watching a pro stunter roll past at 100 mph with the rear wheel floating four feet off the ground is one of the most visually stunning sights in street freestyle competition.

A sky-high stoppie is also one of the most difficult and dangerous maneuvers to master. Unlike a wheelie, where the rear brake can always return you to terra firma if things get out of hand, there is no safety mechanism to bring things back once a 550-plus-pound sportbike and rider start sailing past the balance point. If you misjudge and build too much momentum on the way up, you're over and done.

In the upper echelon of street freestyle competition, no one rolls endos quite like Thew Blankstrom, the point man for Michigan's Team 1096. Blankstrom was among the first Americans to attempt the insanely long stoppies pioneered by such Euro tricksters as Craig Jones. Never one to imitate, Blankstrom confidently upped the ante and endoed into the record books in spring 2003 when he outdid Jones' Guinness World Record of 738 feet with his own 749-foot stoppie.

How, you might wonder, does he do it? In our latest installment of "How'd They Do That?" Blankstrom breaks down his endo technique and tells us exactly how he consistently gets it up so high and in so many different positions without ever going over the top. Here are his secrets in his own words.



Basic Stoppie


Basic Stoppie
Body position--specifically, keeping your body centered over the bike--is probably the most important aspect of pulling off a safe stoppie. You must first get your body dead-center over the middle of the bike with your head straight, shoulders squared and arms stiff. Having your body off-center is what's going to cause the back end to kick out once you get the back wheel up.

Once you're up to speed and your body is properly positioned, pull the clutch in and get on the brake. Make the initial brake input pretty strong, about 80 percent of full braking pressure, then back off as the bike comes up. Weight transfer is also important. At the same time you begin braking, rock your body forward to move your weight out over the front wheel. Starting from the middle of the seat, bring your shoulders up and slide up along the gas tank until you're off the seat just a little. When you move forward, make sure your body stays as straight as possible. Remember to keep your arms straight with elbows locked so your weight shift doesn't unintentionally steer the bike one way or the other.

As the back end comes up, gradually let off the brake as you approach the balance point. As long as you're on that brake hard, it'll keep coming up. You know you're near the balance point when you're barely on the brake and that back wheel is floating--not going any higher or dropping any lower. When I'm rolling a long one at the balance point, I'm just barely on the front brake--just about five percent, just dragging the pads.

For basic stoppies, you don't really have to think about steering--just keep your arms straight and you'll keep rolling straight. It's only when you start rolling them out really long that you have to worry about steering. The only difference between a 150-foot endo and, say, a 600-foot one is being able to steer it. Steering an endo is just like steering into a corner on two wheels--you have to countersteer. If the back end kicks to the right, push on the right bar and steer into it to pull the front wheel the same way the back end is going. The higher the bike is, the easier it is to steer.

For basic endos, just ride it out to a complete stop, let the back end fall, let out the clutch and ride away. You always want your body straight right up until the moment the tire touches the ground. Any time you move, you add a steering input to the front end. Don't be too worried if the bike gets a little out of line--it can get eight to 10 degrees off and you can still ride it out without highsiding. Sometimes I'll tap the rear brake just before the back end comes down. This stops the tire spinning and tightens the chain to keep it from slapping when it hits. It sounds better--a little style thing.
 

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I understand your consern about flipping over at 30 but trust me, it's a lot easier to flip at 5mph than 30. First thing you need to learn is not to just grab the front brake. That's how you flip. You need to start at at least 30 (I honestly would start around 45 but it's kinda scary) and firmly aply the front brake. Once you feel your forks bottom out lean forward and aply just a little more brake. You're back will rise up with no problem. Start small... very small until you get used to the feeling of your back tire leaving the ground. Once you have that all you have to do is pull the brake a little harder for the height. This how I learned and now I can do it no problem at over 80mph. As far as damage this techniqe will prevent your forks from being under to much stress as the trick is smooth and controlled. A key word for most tricks is SMOOTH. Oh yeah, almost forgot one of the important parts, keep your head up and look forward. Don't look at the ground while your learning. Looking forward keeps your body in the proper position regardless of how high you go.
 

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before all if you think your going over the handlebar let go of thre brake ...always wear your gear..stupid hurts.}{endos: the easiest trick to learn as long as you stay calm and collective step 1 build up a comfy amount of speed bout 30 smiles per hour step 2 apply brake ever so slightly every time harder than the last sometimes you might have to give it a hard tap at first to get it to pop up then feather the brake to keep it up step 3 youl know your at the balance point when your arms are perfectly straight
 
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