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Discussion Starter #1
I know it's probably the last thing you guys want to hear...

I was riding up toward Winters, CA on a twisty backroad when a CHP officer on a bike passed me with sirens on. About a quater mile down the road, two ambulances were on scene. The rider was lying in the middle of the road while the fire dept. EMT did chest compressions. There was a helo. circling overhead, but soon it was called off as they were unable to revive the guy - I didn't know him, there are a lot of bikes on that road on weekends.

Here's the mixed story of what happened - The bike when I saw it was completely destroyed (front end in pieces, crumpled frame) The rider was on a long straight, no turns in sight, when he hit a huge oak tree. There weren't any other cars involved, or motorcycles for that matter - he was riding solo. I didn't even see anything in the road that may have contributed to the accident. One of the FD members said he thought it may have been a wheelie went bad, another said "high-speed wobble" but that seems far fetched in my opinion.

Anyway, this is the first time I've really felt like giving up riding, we'll see how I feel tomorrow. I know you guys probably have a lot of stories like these, of close friends even, but this is the first time it really hit home for me.
 

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Hi ESanders2-

The most one can be expected to do is keep YOUR head screwed-on straight. By that I mean:
  • ride with helmet, leathers, gloves, and boots
  • ride while licensed, insured, and registered
  • ride a bike with perfect maintenance on engine, tires, brakes, and transmission
  • don't ride with knuckleheads...they attract bad luck
  • ride only when rested, alert, and not under the effects of medication
  • hone your skills with advanced riding courses, track days, and riding mountainbikes
As motorcyclists we will occasionally see bad things...and my belief is that these bad things (especially death...) find some riders much easier than they find others. Keep the faith and keep the rubber side down and the shiny side up.

~ Blue Jays ~
 

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Blue Jays said:
...As motorcyclists we will occasionally see bad things...and my belief is that these bad things (especially death...) find some riders much easier than they find others...
And it's not just bikers. Exactly the same thing can be said for cage drivers. It's a shame that it happens but, unfortunately, it's just a part of life.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah that's definitely true guys. You hear about people killed in car accidents all the time, but I've never seen it personally before.

The bike was a newish-looking GSXR, I suspect a 1000 but not sure on that, if you're wondering.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Oh, the one other thing I was gonna say is; I know everyone stressed gear, but in the case I witnessed today he was wearing gear and it definitely wouldn't have mattered either way. I'm not saying anything against gear, it's just that it doesn't always protect you.
 

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ESanders2 said:
...I'm not saying anything against gear, it's just that it doesn't always protect you.
It's think it's universally accepted that gear is not a bullet-proof suit that will protect you from everything, but it definitely increases your chances of survival.
 

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I am not going to sweat over it for it is one of many accidents. We do not know why so we just have to let it go. If I worried over it then I would have quit riding m/cs many years ago.

Things like that are here & gone. I have had many a friend die at home or in the hospital. In fact many of my m/c riding friends have passed away for many reasons. Interesting point is very, very few of my riding friends died while riding a m/cs bar one AND it was not a m/c accident on the street/hwy or even a paved road.

At 69 years of age he died while helping to lay out an enduro, probably one of the best people in laying our enduros or being the representive of Cdn m/c competitors in world enduro events---he died of a heart attack & quickly in something he loved & believed in with around 49 yrs of doing the same thing. What a way to go!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I am not going to sweat over it for it is one of many accidents. We do not know why so we just have to let it go
Smitty - wise point. I think everybody asks the why questions but so few are the times when any answers are apparent. Today a lot of people were asking the "how" question b/c nobody saw the accident first-hand.

About the gear issue, I agree gear does protect you, but excluding the helmet, it's strong point is not impact protection. It seems like it's better at preventing road rash and cuts and bruises than reducing (to a huge amount anyway) impact related injuries.
 

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Most M/C deaths are from impact injuries. That doesn't mean they are always to the head with or with out a helmet. Ribs and other bones get broken and organs get punchered and or bruised resulting in death.
 

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I hate to say it,but these sad stories make me think about everytime i ride like a squid....I saw a girl break her back when she highsided and seen a kid hit a tree and die....I never forget the ones weve lost and there mishaps may save my life....In short,relax,,ride another day.....slow and alive is better than fast and stuck in a tree..... :2cents:
 

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Blue Jays said:


[*]ride a bike with perfect maintenance on engine, tires, brakes, and transmission
[*]don't ride with knuckleheads...they attract bad luck

....my belief is that these bad things (especially death...) find some riders much easier than they find others.

~ Blue Jays ~
To make a very long story short, me and my riding buddies have asked other guys not to ride with us. They didn't do maintenance and were a danger to themselves and us. We felt bad telling them not to come, but...
 

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Desert-Lad said:
To make a very long story short, me and my riding buddies have asked other guys not to ride with us. They didn't do maintenance and were a danger to themselves and us. We felt bad telling them not to come, but...
Been in the same position before. I couldnt bring myself to tell a really cool, outgoing guy not to show up. But functioning brakes are a must. Two of us had to make a pretty quick stop for some reason, his f1 (yeah, f1...) couldnt stop so he cut between us, brushing shoulders.
Luckily, I think he understood the danger, cause I didnt see him on any rides after that... a few month later his bike ended up in a ditch...
 

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I saw two friends get into wrecks with their bikes right in front of me. one friend was being stupid and did a tank wheelie and went too far up. He hits the 12 bar hard and falls off going 45mph. All he had was a helmet, t-shirt, and jeans. He usually wore a jacket but he couldn't find it that one day. he had to learn it the hard way.

Another friend t-bones a truck that swirved right in front of him illegally (we had the right away). Slams the side of the truck bed and looks bad, but he was only going 35mph. The truck driver kept on going and didn't stop. Luckly there was a cop at the intersection and chased the truck down. My friend didn't get hurt and his bike had a cage so it was ok minus some plastics.
 
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