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I want to get a bike preferably a honda cbr 600 f4 i've never ridden before do you think this is a good bike for a beginner
 

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Dittos to Robert. An F4i is a potent machine. I'd look at something a little milder as a first bike. After all, I don't know any pilots that started out with an F-16. Learn to fly a more sedate ride first, then go to a roadburner.
 

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you'll find plenty of people who'll tell you the f4 is a good starter bike. it's not. the article robert posted is a great one.

also, go to a racetrack and watch how fast an ex500 or gs500 or sv650 can go.
 

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CBR600F4 as new bike

I'm new here. I figured I'd break the ice with my 2 cents about this. You sound like me 6-7 months ago. I'm gonna try and make this long story short.
I started thinking about getting into this sport around JUL 2000. I read everything I could get my hands and eyes on. At the time I had NO EXPERIENCE AT ALL. I read a lot of SAFETY & COUNTERSTEERING articles. Being an ex-engineering student, I reaffirmed my conclusion that all drivers of motor-driven vehicles should take a physics class.
Anyways, I put my downpayment on a brand new F4i in November. I took the MSF riding course in early Jan, and became a proud F4i owner on Jan 13th.
Now . . . for the experienced rider this may sound like the makings for disaster. A little bit of education, that gives a new squid too much confidence, and a brand new FAST bike = Severe Injury Or Death. We'll see.
In GENERAL, all you can do is be PREPARED and get all the experience you can get. I have ridden about 1600 miles and have had no regrets yet about my controlled dive into the sport of riding.
I have never been in a car wreck or received a speeding ticket. So . . . if you get in lots of car wrecks (indicative of poor driving skills) or seem to get a lot of speeding tickets (indicative of not paying attention), then STAY ON FOUR WHEELS.

Good luck with your decision.
 

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Yes, you can do what Jim did and not have a problem, but very few people are as cautious and restrained and educated as Jim has been. Still, it can be done. For most though, a smaller bikes is a better choice because it will teach you a lot about sportbike handling and characteristics at a reasonable pace, and without intimidation. Then, with that experience, graduate to a more powerful bike with all the proper respect it is due. And clearly, EX500s and SV650s can rip very nicely.
 

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Re: CBR600F4 as new bike

jimfinn93 said:
(snip) A little bit of education, that gives a new squid too much confidence, and a brand new FAST bike = Severe Injury Or Death. We'll see.(snip)
jimfinn brings up a great point. the msf basic course is the beginning of a never-ending education. i've taken two racing schools after the msf course. and occasionally i'll take my bike up to where they do the msf course and ride the exercises by myself. i also do braking practices. if you are serious about riding, be serious about riding.

amazingly enough, the more i learn, the more i want to learn.

btw, you can start on a big bike and live to tell about it (i did). i just wanna save you the problems of doing it.

my streetbikes are:
79 KZ750 (destroyed)
94 CBR600F2 (one small crash)
88 FZR400 (never down)
00 GSXR750 (never down).

honestly, i enjoy the 400 the most. too much horsepower is a hinderance.
 

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I also at age 20 started on a CBR600 F3. I was very responsible about it, and had a good friend by my side to teach me, and ride with me at all times. If not for him I would have probably not done so well.

I agree that a total learner bike is always a good start, but a 600 can be done. Anything bigger than a 600 for a first bike is asking for trouble I think though, even if a level headed fellow (or gal). GS500 is always the bike that pops into my head, cheap, easy to find, cheap, cheap, did I say cheap?
 

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I did the whole "buy a beginner bike to learn on" thing. I regreted it completely. I got out of my riders education class and bought my first bike ever, an SV650. I had never even riden a bike before and I out grew my bike in 5 months. Not to downgrade the quality of the SV, but if you want a rocket get a rocket. I just bought my second bike, a CBR900RR and I love it. I wouldn't say jump up to a 900 right away, but buy the bike you want. I lost a lot of money trading my SV in for the CBR, I wish I would have made the right choice first.
 

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Well, to each his own, but I have been riding off and on for over 15 years and I have an SVS and really enjoy it. I agree it is not a fire breathing monster, but it sure is a lot of fun. When the US Air Force trains a pilot, they start out with trainers, not F-117s. Same deal with us. Even after the MSF classes, which are great, there is a lot to learn about sportbike handling, and its easier to learn on a lighter, less sensitive, less demanding, motorcycle, than on a 100+hp rocket. And after all these years, I'm still learning.
 

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strada said:
Well, to each his own, but I have been riding off and on for over 15 years and I have an SVS and really enjoy it. I agree it is not a fire breathing monster, but it sure is a lot of fun. (snip)
why is it that experienced riders love the sv and new guys hate it?

i know a guy who had a 86 gsxr750le. he bought an sv and sold the 750. it's funny i go to the local bike shop and we end up talking about rz350's, fzr400's, hawk650's and the sv650.

you don't have to lose a bunch on the trade in. hell you can find an ex500 at the right price, ride it a season and sell it for about what you paid for it.

as for outgrowing a 650, it's best to wait to buy a bike until your height tops out.
 

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Digweed said:
I did the whole "buy a beginner bike to learn on" thing. I regreted it completely....... ...... I lost a lot of money trading my SV in for the CBR, I wish I would have made the right choice first.
What's more important to you, saving money or saving your ass???

As for the SV being boring, I know there are guys out there racing these things and doing very well against all sorts of 600's. I wonder how badly they'd smoke some kid on a 900?

These are very popular bikes in europe where they are NOT considered a beginners bike. If the bike doesn't have enough jam, there's lots fof aftermarket stuff coming out for them.
 

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I started out on an 1990 FZR400 also. What an awesome bike. It wasn't the most powerful thing out there but once I learned how to ride it it was the bike to keep up with in the twisites. Unfortunately, I sold this perfect condition FZR so that I could move up to a 1993 CBR-F2. Only to have alittle more power to pack a passenger on the back.

Well, I got married and so on and so forth... and I restarted on an older bike, am old CB750. Now back in the game with my CBR900RR.

I am a believer in starting out small. Although the FZR400 wasnt a real learners bike it was a small and light bike. I doubt very much that a new rider can outride a new 600 in one year. Not impossible but quite unlikely.

I also highly recommend the motorcycle riders course. In California the number is 1 800 CC Rider.

Michael
 

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get a 600

I started out on a 91 cbr 600 ss in downtown louisville with very little experience. That is stupid. Okay, I admit that. But driving a motorcycle is NOT flying an f-16, or whatever other plane it is being compared to. The last time I checked, 135-160 mph (depending on year) is not machII. Nor do you have to land your 600 on the deck of a pitching and yawing aircraft carrier. I would recommend that if you are level headed, go ahead and get on the 600. Yeah, you can get yourself in trouble....but I just reminded myself that while I had a lot of power underneath me, and this was the fastest machine that I had ever owned, it commanded respect. Respect your bike before you start to push it. Take it slow, and you will know exactly when that will be.
 

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sp1 [rc51]

just tried out an rc51
probably best looking bike on planet
sweet motor
riding position ok if you have got hinges in your
lower back and base of neck

not for me!!

ralph

and yes i know that was not the subject
 

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First bike EVER! 2001 CBR600f4i

I've been reading the boards feverishly for the past 3 hours trying to find some reassuring words about new riders on 600cc bikes. The responses have been mixed. What I have gathered from reading is that motorcycles demand respect. Anything with such a drastic power to weight ratio would, I suspect. I have salivated over motorcycles ever since my early teens. I am 28 years old, have been driving for over 10 years, the last four of which I have been driving a five speed MX-6, and never been in an accident. I consider my driving skills to be above average. My coordination is excellent and I have been a mountain biker for about five years. I have great balance and control on my bike at any speed and an eye for finding good lines. That being said, I hope my transition into riding a motorcycle will be a smooth one. I'm banking on it. I am a responsible man with a healthy respect for fear and yes I am trying to convince myself that I've made a practical decision and won't end up on a stretcher inside a speeding ambulance.

I'm 6'0", 185 lbs. I sat on the F4i and both my feet were firmly planted on the ground. The bike feels light enough to control and I've leaned the bike and feel that I can keep from tipping it over. I've read so much and talked to so many bikers and I feel I know how to work the clutch and change gears and everything else, I just need to put in in practice within a safe area.

How smooth is the shift into first gear? I talked to a guy who says that his first time he slipped a bike into first he gave too much throttle and the bike launched! The same guy said too little throttle and the bike stalled. How do I keep myself from being embarassed when I go to pick up my bike. In my car I can ease off the clutch and roll smoothly in first. Can I slowly release the clutch on the bike in first without throttle or what?
 

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Starting off in 1st!!

You're absolutely right!! The clutch on your bike is just liek the one in your car....if the bike is plenty warm, if you let the clutch out slowly enough, you'll feel it engaging and start to pull you forward. If you look down at your tach, you'll notice the revs starting to dip, the engine changing note and there you have it. gently open the throttle.......

Many first time riders stall because the bike is cold, the engine is fighting to circulate cold thick oil and they're letting the clutch out way to quickly.

Be smooth in every aspect of your riding.
 

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Okay here is my two cents on the matter.

My first bike is the current bike I ride. I brought brand new a '98 600 F3. I do not regret it for a minute!!!! I will admit that I was unsure of myself for a while until I got used to the bike, the MSF courses helped a lot also.

If you are a responsible driver and adult get a 600 it willo last you longer. If you don't have the money or are not confidant of a 600 then get a smaller bike. It is amazing how you can psyc yourself into think you will crash or wreck and make it a self fulfilling prophecy.
 

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Digweed said:
I did the whole "buy a beginner bike to learn on" thing. I regreted it completely. I got out of my riders education class and bought my first bike ever, an SV650...
I did just the same! My first bike was an sv650, and I don't regret it for a second. I bought a Ducati this spring, and wish I could have kept the Suzuki as well. It was all kinds of fun and super easy to learn on, and it was much cheaper than a 600, not to mention the fact that it didn't have a bunch of plastic to scratch up when I dropped it. I replaced the clutch lever and the mirror, and it was good as new. I got a decent resale on it too. I"ll stop babbling and just say that getting an sv650 as a first bike is a VERY good idea.
 

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my opinion...
I have ridden dirt bikes with friends (theirs), rose a 3 wheeler once (learned to shift on that) years ago.
I planned on buying a used bike for the cost/what if i drop it reasons. I also was looking for something smaller than a 600. (or an older 600) Well, one day i walked into a dealership and saw a brand new F4 on sale for an inventory reduction sale...I bought it.
I love it dearly and won't get rid of it BUT... If i had it to do over again, i'd have stuck with my first plan and bought smaller, less powerful. There's too many times that i back off b/c i'm not ready for the power the bike wants to put out.
I took the MSF course, and did well, and i'm taking a CLASS track day to be a better rider. I think my learning curve is a little slower than it would have been if i had a used bike.

Just my opinion.. Good luck.
 
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