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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering what some of the more experienced riders had to say about this bike. To get an idea of my skill level read this link. Originally I wanted a sportbike. Now I'm really not sure if I want to get one just due to all the things that could go wrong while I'm on it due to inexperience. The main factor that kept me from considering other bikes is that to me, a lot of other bikes are just ugly imo. Until I saw the 2005 Kawasaki ZZR600 that is. I've read a lot of reviews and this bikes seems to be acceptable as a beginner's bike. So what do you think?

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Seriously? I have to admit, that is the only post that I have read that has said this isn't a good starter bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
MrRogers said:
Look at the Suzuki GS500.
They look just like a race replica but more forgiving if you make a mistake.
No offense or anything, but I wouldn't say that bike looks just like a race replica. Personally, I think that bike is ugly too.
 

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I'm going to relate to you on a more personal level.

I'm a relatively new rider like yourself that made the mistake of buying a 2003 r6. The first time I took it off the lot, I pulled a wheelie by accident because the throttle is more responsive than what I was used to.

A few days later, I was installing frame sliders and I laid the bike down on the left side in my garage.

Every time I ride my bike, I'm so unbelievably cautious not to do any dumb things that will cause more damage to my bike or more importantly to myself.

Save yourself the money and the drama. Buy some used bike that you can learn on without worrying all the time so it will make the transition to your next bike easier.

no argument here. just sound advice.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
MrRogers said:
I'm going to relate to you on a more personal level.

I'm a relatively new rider like yourself that made the mistake of buying a 2003 r6. The first time I took it off the lot, I pulled a wheelie by accident because the throttle is more responsive than what I was used to.

A few days later, I was installing frame sliders and I laid the bike down on the left side in my garage.

Every time I ride my bike, I'm so unbelievably cautious not to do any dumb things that will cause more damage to my bike or more importantly to myself.

Save yourself the money and the drama. Buy some used bike that you can learn on without worrying all the time so it will make the transition to your next bike easier.

no argument here. just sound advice.
I completely understand your logic. But the ZZR600 isn't even classed as a sportbike, but as a street bike. It has much better mid range power so it's a lot more user friendly when riding around the city. The reviews I've read have said this bike doesn't even really start to hit it's power band until about 10k rpms, when I believe most modern sportbike will start to hit theirs around the 7k-8k rpm range. It has less overall power than a modern sportsbike, so it won't give ya as much as a shock and more time to respond when you do hit the power band. It has good braking from what I've read but it's still not as good as modern sportbikes so there's less of a chance that I'll accidently lock up the brakes or flip it. Sure it's more of a bike to handle than maybe a kawasaki 500 but it's seems to be a much better choice than any modern sportbike. I do appreciate your concerns though. I would really like to hear what Smitty has to say since he has years and years of experience on bikes.

Thanks for the responses so far though:)
 

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MrRogers said:
...Buy some used bike that you can learn on without worrying all the time so it will make the transition to your next bike easier...
:thumb:
 

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It's the same bike that was released as ZX-6R back in 2000, which was indeed a race rep, though not much sensationalized as the other three for the lack of track prowess. It will do wheelie on throttle, the mid-range is up to par with 2003 R6, because back in its day, it was the torquiest 600 cc, a real sleeper. The top end wasn't quite as powerful as the other three, but this is all relative. The midrange of that bike is good enough to flip if the rider doesn't have sensitive throttle control. Anyway... it's considered sport tourer now just like F4i or YZF600R, only because the RR these days provide much sharper track package. That doesn't mean the ZZR or 600R or F4i is short on power.
 

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I think you know you SHOULDN'T get this bike as your first, and are trying to justify it somehow, or by someone else tell you it's fine and dandy for a first bike.

Learning on a sport bike safely is more than just taking it easy on the throttle...these bikes respond much more harshly than a 500 or 250 bike other than just throttle response and power.

Today I thought of something that happened to me on the Katana 600 I owned. Keep in mind many people think it's a great beginner's bike, because compared to the new 600's it's "heavy and slow," but it was THE 600 sport bike in the late 80's.

I was pulling onto a main street from a stop, hit the throttle a little hard, but far from having it snapped wide open. The tires were cold and/or I went over some oil, because as I accelerated, the rear tire spun and the ass of the bike snapped sideways, and went into a small tankslapper. Because it's been literally drilled into my head from MSF and reading sites like this you should stay ON the throttle in this situation, I did that and the bike straightened itself out, and the only damage was to my boxers.

While I safely tooled down the street, I remember thinking to myself "that never would have happened on my Ninja 250."(which was my first bike) And if I was on something like an R6, I probably would have gone right the hell down.

Take it for what it's worth...but because you've never ridden a sport bike, there's reasons you're not aware of yet why this isn't a good choice for your first pony.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I think you know you SHOULDN'T get this bike as your first, and are trying to justify it somehow, or by someone else tell you it's fine and dandy for a first bike.
This was the case when I wanted a new 2005 sportbike, but not the case this time. I actually thought this would be a decent starter bike. Well I do appreciate all the info but I think this is the bike I'm going to get. I know looks aren't everything when looking for a beginner's bike, but I won't be 100% happy if I get a bike more suitable for a beginner and it doesn't have the looks I want. Until I actually buy the bike I'll keep looking for a smaller bike with the look I want but I've already done a lot of research so I think this will be the one. I'll just have to be cautious and pray for the best.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
This was a close second choice but I can't seem to find a picture of it with the fairing on it. I do like the looks of it(like the ZZR600 better), but it would look a lot better to me with a good fairing. I'll look for more pictures of it with fairings. If I find one and it looks good(sure it would) I would probably get the SV650s instead. And yes, a MSF course and FULL gear are a must with me. I've had really bad road rash before and I'm am going to the extremes to make sure it doesn't happen again (road rash really sucks :( ).

Thanks for the responses:)
 

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Look around the other threads. There's a pic or two of the SV with a lower fairing. Sorry, can't remember exactly where...
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Finally found a really nice picture of the SV650s with fairings.



I must say, with the fairings, this bike looks even better than the ZZR600 IMO. Think I found my new bike. Thanks guys:)
 

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It's definitely a more aggressive sports look than the ZZR, much as I love the Zed.

I'm sure when you find 'the one' you two will be very happy together. Happy riding!

Remember, shiny side up, rubber side down.
 

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Actually the Kwacker ZZR-600 is competitive to the Yamaha YZF600R in price & almost performance. Truely NOT the bike I would advise to an almost newbie. A second bike then YES.

In '00 two fellow riders came around to my place as they had been out of the m/c world since late 80s though both had muscle bikes in their fours of that time.

Knowing one was very experienced & loaded with money I let him take out my YZF600r. Told him the brakes were deadly & when it would come on pipe. Also some of the handling bits of the bike for as far as both had ever got was putting flat bars on their bikes.

Said rider came back shaking his head & admitted he nearly dumped it when he came to the first stop sign & had trouble in handeling the bike upon the right turn of the hwy. I think he took it up to 5 tho in 4th gear & decided that was IT.

So both looked around for older bikes & this one found another Honda CB750 of the old days & built it like his prior bike. The others chap waited two more yrs & latched onto a 'used' Suzy SV-650, but not the SV-650.

So it is really up to you. The brakes of the bikes in those days & these days are almost the same, the handeling is more forgiving then more modern 600s. & the bike does not have the HP of modern 600s.

Still to-day I only had a 5 hr run on my 600R & sort of hiked it back a bit early as I could see a lot of rain comiing in when going back.

Still often I was scooting along on 100kph roads doing 140 to 180kph & even bends at 140 when suggested 40kph. True the suspension of said bikes is a bit to soft especially in the rear for I can feel the big difference when riding my Honda 929 or 954.

I will admit that the bike is not as leaned forward as more modern bikes & like the ZZXR-600 the saddle is a bit to soft for my liking.

You seemed pretty set on the Kwacker so it is up to you, only remember the Yamaha YZF-600r & the Kwacker ZZXR-600 are so similiar though the 600r has a slightely better power-plant.
 

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just remember

Remember that the difference in the 600's today and 5 years ago are big and not so big. When you go to a track a good rider on the zzr600 will smoke an average rider on an R6. The bikes are still very close in abilities. Very fast, sharp brakes, and plenty of horsepower. I have the 2000 zx6r which is the same as the zzr600. The biggest difference is that it has carbs. Modern bikes are all F.I. Here is my favorite reviews on these bikes. I didn't read everything so I hope this isn't a repost. But check this out
zx6r zzr600 reviews
 
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