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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-18-2005, 08:53 PM Thread Starter
 
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Motorcycle transmission

I was just wondering how different a motorcycles clutch and trans are from a cars Thanks
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-19-2005, 06:01 AM
 
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The biggest difference is a shift drum, as most cars dont have them. Also, most car clutches are dry, most bikes are oil bathed.



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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-19-2005, 06:35 AM
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Car clutchs use only one plate. Motorcycles use several.

A few ccs short of a full litre.
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-19-2005, 06:37 AM
 
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Ok, since we're talking clutches, they are pretty different in design. Cars dont have clutch baskets, and use different springs, along with a whole lot of other parts...



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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-19-2005, 12:17 PM
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Do a search on howstuffworks.com for motorcycle transmission or sequential transmission and read that. LOTS of good info there.
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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-20-2005, 04:39 PM Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for all the info, Ive been reading a lot about them the past couple days. Seeing as I have never ridden a motorcycle how hard do you think it would be to learn if you already know how to drive a manual car?
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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-20-2005, 08:35 PM
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It's a lot simpler in my opinion to use the clutch and shift in a bike, if you can already drive a manual tranny car, there should be no problem adjusting. Just watch the downshifts, wrongly timed shifts can have your rear doing terrible things, and on a bike it's dangerous than blowing some parts in a car.

The other diffference is, you can't just shift the gear in neutral from any gear and coast sometimes as you can on a car. To do that on a bike, you'd have to be in 2nd or 1st, and well, there'd be no reason do that unless you've stopped.

But it's the other things that require 110% attention while riding a motorcycle.
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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-21-2005, 12:09 AM
 
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Operating a motorcycle is cake, operating one well requires practice. Im still the former.
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-21-2005, 05:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by Witt
Thanks for all the info, Ive been reading a lot about them the past couple days. Seeing as I have never ridden a motorcycle how hard do you think it would be to learn if you already know how to drive a manual car?

If you can drive a stick, handling a bike transmition isnt difficult. It takes abit to get used to clutching with your hand and shifting with your foot, but its essentially the same thing... Well, one exception, bikes are much much easier to stall.



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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-23-2005, 03:08 PM
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Here's a STM Slipper Clutch. Little more complicated than a cage clutch. More expensive too. This is a dry clutch and runs outside of the engine case. I can change the plates in about 10 minutes
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File Type: jpg stm.jpg (101.7 KB, 63 views)

A few ccs short of a full litre.

Last edited by mac020; 12-23-2005 at 03:22 PM.
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