yep, I need a bike (new rider) - Sportbike Forum: Sportbike Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 08-16-2005, 09:59 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 39
yep, I need a bike (new rider)

The usual, help me with my first bike stuff...

After searching these forums and talking to friends I have decided on a sv650s. First question, how much would you spend for a first bike. Do I need to spend $2000 to get a decent bike? $4000? I'm sorry I know there can be many answers to this question but I'm just looking for some general help.

What should I look for in the bike? Previous Owner? Danger signs or damage?

Has anyone purchased one of these for a first bike and regretted it?

On another note, I understand the reasons for buying a smaller, easier to ride bike first and then upgrading later but what about your equipment? Same concept or just go for the stuff that will last you some time?

Thanks in advance for your help!
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 08-16-2005, 10:25 PM
 
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By "equipment" I assume it is protective gear? So really that can also be built up, like so many do know know how a helmet should fit & will usually demand one that is larger & once they get up to speeds of 60mph they notice the helmet comes loose as it was not a good fit in the first place. So keep your price down on your first helmet for you will probably do things to it like roughing it up & something you would NOT do to a top grade helmet for by THEN you know better.

Go for the jacket, gloves, boots, & trousers like one step at a time for by the next yr you will know better of what you should have ordered. Where you might have turned down the idea of spending for the better line was in the wrong section & it should have been the better quality for something else that would have been the correct step.

Yes a lot to learn in the world of m/cing & yes I personally feel even if you have taken the MSF Course, which you ARE going to take first are you not? Then the first bike does not have to be a Suzy SV-650 or 650S for during the course you will have second thoughts about what should be your first bike as balancing a bike is not like you see it in the TV or as riders scoot down the streets & possibly no one told you about traction & so much more.

Last edited by Smitty; 08-16-2005 at 10:29 PM.
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 08-17-2005, 12:19 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 39
msc

Thanks for your advice on the safety gear.

Yes I will be taking the motorcycle safety course next month. It's only $100 in WA and from what I understand the ones around here are awesome. Part of the reason I'm picking the sv650s is besides from hearing in these forums that it is a good starting bike is that I have ridden my buddy's some and feel very good on it. It fits well and I feel confident (but that doesn't mean I will act stupid on it, I just know riding a bike and feeling unsure is a recipe for disaster!)
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 08-17-2005, 09:16 AM
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
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you can pay any range of prive you want...depends on miles, conditions etc.

here are a few helpful links i have found.

http://www.clarity.net/~adam/buying-bike-content.html (good infor when looking at used bikes)

http://www.msf-usa.org/ (find a MSF safety course near you and take it if you have not)

that and there is tons of info on this forum and others.

good luck!
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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 08-17-2005, 09:22 AM
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 675
good riding gear is a must. It has saved countless lives and tons of skin.... I saw helmet gloves jacket prove it's self again last night when a newbee friend wend down.... He was lucky to come out of it with 2 broken ribs fractured ankle and shoulder.

I would recommend getting quality gear... not the most expensive but not the cheapest stuff either. Make sure it's comfortable. Depending on when and where you ride I would make suggestions. Mesh armored jackets are nice and somewhat protective but IMO not much can be quality leather with padding. If your not gonna wear the Leather on hot days or can't afford it just get something you will wear.... No matter how good it is it won't help in your closet at home cause it's too hot to wear.

good luck be safe and sign up for a MC riders corse. They teach good techniques and also will teach even a seasoned rider some new things! If nothing else it is great for riding confidence.
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 08-17-2005, 12:02 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 128
I'll sell you a 1991 ZX-7 / ZX-7R. It has only had 3 owners, all newbies. It has the R tranny in it but it doesn't show on the title. cheap to insure and it's the same bike color scheme that was raced on the circuit. New Rear tire, New Kevlar Clutch not yet in bike, Vance & Hines pipe, rear stand, clear tail light, eliminator, flush mount front blinkers, New sprockets front and rear as well as new DID chain. Have all origionals as well. good brakes + an xtra set still in package for the front. Engine gasket kit unused.
It has other xtras as well but you get the idea.
PM me if you are interested and I'll get you more info. Im right next to spokane, WA in CDA.
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 08-17-2005, 12:04 PM
 
Join Date: May 2005
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first bike zx7....



ciome on... even if you had lots of dirtbike experience it wouldn't be my first choice.

but what ever you want !

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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 08-17-2005, 01:11 PM
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
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Remember it's a 1991 with a weight ratio of a german tank. it's pushes about 76-84 hp. not much for a bike that weighs that much. the tank is longer rather than being fat and the whole bike sits lower than most. I actually have 4 buddies that have learned on either a 1990 or 1991 ZX-7 and two of them never rode dirt bikes before.

From the sounds of it I would have to agree that it isn't a wise choice. However, after sitting on it and feeling the smooth power it is a pretty good choice unless you weigh less than 115 lbs or are over 6'2" or so.

aside from that, like I have suggested many times, the EX Ninja series, GS500, or the SV650 are perfect starter bikes.

good luck and have fun.
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 08-17-2005, 06:40 PM
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Re: msc

Quote:
Originally posted by ericande
Thanks for your advice on the safety gear.

Yes I will be taking the motorcycle safety course next month. It's only $100 in WA and from what I understand the ones around here are awesome. Part of the reason I'm picking the sv650s is besides from hearing in these forums that it is a good starting bike is that I have ridden my buddy's some and feel very good on it. It fits well and I feel confident (but that doesn't mean I will act stupid on it, I just know riding a bike and feeling unsure is a recipe for disaster!)
Eric, you will (and should) feel confident on your bike after only a month or so, I'd guess. The real key is not feeling like a racer b/c the first surprise will be a painful lesson of how little you know. IMHO (ONLY!!) a good dose of paranoia is outstanding survival instinct.

To offer you really specific suggestions on gear, I'd buy in this order, depending on your financial situation:
1) Helmet
2) Jacket
3) Gloves
4) Pants
5) Boots

Whether you buy textile or leather depends on the type of riding you do and your typical riding weather conditions. Lurk about the Gear section and drop back with things you can't find, don't understand, or need more focused responses to.

Don't buy a used helmet, period. If you want to save some money, just pick up a DOT to start with. SNELL is a better option, but the prices can begin to get up there and there's plenty of room for arguing if the value's really delivered. I do own and daily use a SNELL nonetheless.

Fit for jacket and pants depends on the material. Whatever you opt to do, get double stitched gear b/c it will survive the falls much better and offer far greater protection. Armor is always a good deal to have installed as well; "hard" is preferred and you'll probably want it installed into the gear for the most part.

Gloves should have velcro straps to secure them to your hands. My AGV ones have two sets of straps for an extra tight fit.

Alternatives until you get more $:
-Denim anything is the best material aside from leather and the specialized textiles. However, make no mistake in understanding its probably good for no more than about 5' and avoid any denim having holes or that is bleached or faded. Those are all signs of weakness. Stone wash is what I use for very short trips.
-Boots should cover your ankles. Hiking boots are a good substitute until riding boots can be afforded. These were my second to last gear purchase (pants were last). Tuck in those laces if you have any!

Where to get all this stuff? Locally is my top recommendation. Not only can you try it on, but you can start to form a relationship with the dealer which can help you out down the road. Often they're willing to work on price, esp if you know what it goes for online. But you should pay a premium b/c they stocked it for you to try out.

An alternative is www.newenough.com, which you've probably already read about. But since you can't try stuff on, its hard to know what sizes to order. The staff are friendly and helpful and the prices are great, esp on the clearance stuff (and there's lots of that!).

Oh, as for bike. Older bikes (early 90's) are probably fine, but remember that the older a bike is, the more maintenance it will require. If part of your aim is to learn some mechanical skills, this is a great way to start and save some money. If you only want to ride, buy nothing older than a 2000, IMO, and if possible something that has fuel injection (FI). Carbs are a pain. Ooops, last thing. Whatever you get, locate a shop manual for it. Clymer or the manufacturer both make these helpful for both troubleshooting and routine maint, which saves you $ in the long run.

Well, I've got to run for now.

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When you're in a car, you're watching a movie; when you're on a bike, you're in the movie. --Robert Pirsig

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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 08-18-2005, 03:43 PM
 
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Re: Re: msc

Quote:
Originally posted by kanwisch

Oh, as for bike. Older bikes (early 90's) are probably fine, but remember that the older a bike is, the more maintenance it will require. If part of your aim is to learn some mechanical skills, this is a great way to start and save some money. If you only want to ride, buy nothing older than a 2000, IMO, and if possible something that has fuel injection (FI). Carbs are a pain. Ooops, last thing. Whatever you get, locate a shop manual for it. Clymer or the manufacturer both make these helpful for both troubleshooting and routine maint, which saves you $ in the long run.

Excellent point. I totally agree. After looking over your origional statement, I may have misread. If this will be your very first bike (ie. never had a dirtbike either) then you would probably be more confertable on a newer one, try the EX series.

This is going to be the biggest factor in which bike you choose. If you are not confertable on it, it will take longer to get used to and is all in all unsafe. I would suggest sitting on some to get a feel and then look at the cycle trader in your area to see about what that make and model go for. you can also check NADA and KBB.com to get the Blue Book Values. Also Craigslist.com has bikes in the seattle area and washingtonriders.com has a for sale section.

Good luck and Congrats on entering the sport, just always remember that everyone is out to kill you when you are on a bike.
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