Leaning and Countersteering - Sportbike Forum: Sportbike Motorcycle Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-10-2002, 01:48 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 2
Question Leaning and Countersteering

Hi guys i am new to this board, and i dont have a bike yet, but i have already saved almost half the money. i plan on buying a 97-98 f3 or a 97- yzf600r, anyways i have been reading alot on countersteering and braking and all that other good stuff and i am sort of confused about leaning and countersteering. I know its probably somthing i will understand better when i finally get to ride, but are countersteering and leaning two different operations, or does your lean angle come from the countersteer? Some good feedback on this would really help clear things up for me while i sit here till next june in agonizing pain waiting to get my fist bike.
f3wannabe is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-10-2002, 02:11 PM
Moderator
 
Hammer 4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Torrance,CA. USA 90504
Posts: 3,059
WElcome to the boardz..

K..leaning, and countersteering...to make it simple...ever ride a bicycle..? if yes, then when ya turn a bicycle at higher speeds, ya leaned a bit, and countersteered..it's about the only way on a m/c that your able to turn...It may seem confusing now, but once you get a bike, and ride..you'll see..nothing magical, or mystifing about it..lean, push right, to go left, ands visa versa..

Old, Slow, but ...Smooth
Hammer 4 is offline  
post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-10-2002, 11:11 PM
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 2
Hammer
Perhaps I'm not following what you're saying but don't you mean push right to go right? (ie: push the right clip-on forward to go right)

F3
TAKE A TRAINING COURSE
I think it's MSF for you south of the border folks. It'll teach you lots and if you do f&%k up it's on their bikes so you don't have to worry about scratching your baby girl.

Good luck
slowrider is offline  
 
post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-11-2002, 06:26 AM
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 181
Get one of the books like Proficient Motorcycling. They do a good job of explaining it. When you push on the right clipon the bike turns left momentarily, this causes the bike to fall to the right which makes turning easier. Most people countersteer naturally and alot never realize that they are doing it.
Smoke Eater is offline  
post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-11-2002, 06:34 AM
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 5
October SportRider issue

October issue of Sportrider has a big article in the back on Countersteering vs. Leaning.

Check it out and good luck!
Ample is offline  
post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-11-2002, 06:52 AM
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 13
Quote:
Originally posted by Smoke Eater
Get one of the books like Proficient Motorcycling. They do a good job of explaining it. When you push on the right clipon the bike turns left momentarily, this causes the bike to fall to the right which makes turning easier. Most people countersteer naturally and alot never realize that they are doing it.
And it is those who aren't aware of the concept wonder why they couldn't move the bike out of the way fast enough, when avoiding a sudden obstacle.

Take the MSF before getting on any bike...they explain all of that. And as someone else said, if you mess up, it isn't your bike you'll scratch!

Also, taking the MSF class generally exempts you from having to take the DMV's road course...which I hear is a pain. And most insurance companies offer a discount for MSF grads.
NinjaRat is offline  
post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-11-2002, 07:08 AM
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 6,400
So much like riding a bicycle at high speed.

Friend of mine had to quit m/cing back in '52 to bring up a family. Decided to get back to riding in late 80s & was confused about this "countersteering" he was reading in the m/c mag till he was back on his 'used' m/c for lst time & realized he had been doing this from his early yrs before WWII & during WWII when on a bicycle.
No one though of this word "countersteering" when we rode m/cs immediately after WWII ---- it just came natural to all of us that rode bicycles in prior yrs.
Smitty is offline  
post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-11-2002, 07:24 AM
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 6,400
Excellet point here for newbies.

This friend of mine started riding m/cs as soon as he came over to Cdn (from the UK) in 1945 on a 98cc, then a 125 & finally up to a 350cc AJS 4-stroke single then had to give up to support a family.
Back to riding in late 80s with a used 400CC twin & by next yr bought a good 'used' BMW & later a NEW 1000cc Beemer-----here is a rider with experience that even when he went back to riding with experience to feel out what it was like to ride again on a sort of guttless used 400. At 76 yrs of age he is still riding & in his complete life has never had a m/c accident or a cage accident. A rider with the OLD SCHOOL OF LEARNING being a step by step in time!!!!!!
Smitty is offline  
post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-11-2002, 07:43 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 2
so basically, the harder you countersteer the greater the leanangle, or is leanangle also affected by speed, meaning if you ride through a turn several times at diferent speeds does your leanangle become lower since you have more force being put on you.
f3wannabe is offline  
post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-11-2002, 07:59 AM
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 5
Basically the more you lean off the bike, the more straight up and down the bike can be whilst cornering. if you can keep the bike more vertical at the same cornering speed, you will have more room to lean before you start dragging hard parts, and therefore more speed through the corner.

my $.02
Ample is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Sportbike Forum: Sportbike Motorcycle Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome