My first 1,000 miles - Sportbike Forum: Sportbike Motorcycle Forums
 
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-24-2002, 08:17 PM Thread Starter
 
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Thumbs up My first 1,000 miles

Well the trip odometer just reset itself after my first 1,000 miles. So far so good... The parents still are not all for it but theyre home and im at school and thats ok by me. My first 1,000 have been for the most part incident free and highly educational. I hate driving my car now, I ride my bike everywhere I physically can. I've found a new release for the stresses of daily life (aka inbetween class trips to some of my favorite riding spots) and met alot of new people. I somewhat regretfully put these first thousand under my belt without the guidance of MSF, but like i said, thats somewhat regretful. I learned a hell of alot about riding by talking to people like you who have ridden and do ride. I will one day get around to taking it, but until then Ill keep my ears, eyes, and mind open to everything that comes at me. I have always felt that experiance is the best teacher and riding has just reaffirmed that with me. I am by no means ready for a 929 or R1 now, im still new and it can be argued that my F3 is still too big for me, but so far shes done me well, very well. So, until the next 1,000 miles, shiny side up Thanks all.
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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-24-2002, 09:16 PM
 
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hey kyle, I kno exactly what you mean by relieve stress. Glad to see you kept your bike up and had fun on your first 1000. I think i just finished my first 100 and I already dropped it at about 2 mph and frickin UGLY scratches on my left fairings sigh, it was so pristine before....
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-26-2002, 02:28 PM
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The MSF course is painless. Learning the hard way on the street can be fatal. I learned a lot at MSF. That's after 2 solid months of reading and asking questions. Are you practicing your panic stops using both brakes? How about controlling a rear wheel skid? Slow speed corners? Are you covering you rear brake while in a turn (a no no)? Are you looking 12 seconds ahead when you ride through populated areas? Ideally, what part of the lane should you be in if there's a left turner facing you at the intersection? The course made me think a lot. IF you don't have time for the MSF course now I suggest you pick up David Hough's Proficient Motorcycling in addition to talking to other riders. You'll get a ton of street riding tips in one book that you can keep as a reference. It's been my experience that nothing beats being prepared. Enjoy your ride.
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-26-2002, 03:17 PM Thread Starter
 
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Oh no I think you misunderstood... I didn't say that I wasn't going to take the MSF, I by all means am (both beginner and Experienced), I just haven't had the funds yet. And about all the "have you" questions, yes, I spend alot of time in empty parking lots and i have had several encounters with animals, left handers at lights, etc...all of which I thought I handled pretty well.
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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-27-2002, 05:18 AM
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Kyle, don't get me wrong, There's an easy way and a hard way. There was another newb who posted on another forum who'd had an accident that was largely avoidable. Essentially he ran into a car that had stopped to make a left turn in front of him. He was following two cars and while he was turning his head to check his rear (?!) the first car stopped to turn make a left turn and the second car passed it on the right side. So he looks forward again and now there's a stopped car in his path that's about 40 feet away. The second car may have been screening the signal. I don't know his speed. I assume it was dry and the pavement was even or he would've mentioned it. He grabbed both brakes, which is the proper way to achieve the shortest stopping distance, but skidded the rear. The bike went down and he got a lot of uneccesary road rash as he slid into the cars bumper. The guy's OK otherwise.

Kyle, I see three things he could've done to avoid or lessen the accident. As an armchair riding newb (damn this economy!!!), I'm a sponge for other peoples experiences an knowledge. I thought I'd hash this out with ya. What do you see in this story?

Steve
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-27-2002, 06:10 AM
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kyle, you think i'd suggest to you when riding pre-msf course is get some place open and experience counter-steering. most people natural do it in everything but a panic situation.

i started doing this years ago and now i even do it if i have a bad first practice racing.

on the warmup lap and while riding on the street, i take my hands and place them open against the bars while moving.

i then push on each bar. and get the idea of push right, turn right embedded into my skull.

it will also teach you how much better (and more comfortable) it is to ride your bike without a death grip on the bars.

hopefully, you'll never need an emergancy lane change or swerve, but chances are you will. this simple little exercise will hopefully help you out with it when you do.

i hope you hit 100,000 with just as much ease.

Tony

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A braveman stands in front of freedom and defends it for others.


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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-27-2002, 06:50 AM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by NSteveA
Kyle, don't get me wrong, There's an easy way and a hard way. There was another newb who posted on another forum who'd had an accident that was largely avoidable. Essentially he ran into a car that had stopped to make a left turn in front of him. He was following two cars and while he was turning his head to check his rear (?!) the first car stopped to turn make a left turn and the second car passed it on the right side. So he looks forward again and now there's a stopped car in his path that's about 40 feet away. The second car may have been screening the signal. I don't know his speed. I assume it was dry and the pavement was even or he would've mentioned it. He grabbed both brakes, which is the proper way to achieve the shortest stopping distance, but skidded the rear. The bike went down and he got a lot of uneccesary road rash as he slid into the cars bumper. The guy's OK otherwise.

Kyle, I see three things he could've done to avoid or lessen the accident. As an armchair riding newb (damn this economy!!!), I'm a sponge for other peoples experiences an knowledge. I thought I'd hash this out with ya. What do you see in this story?

Steve
Well I see alot... and whoever else reads this may see something different. If he was 40 feet away and locked the back wheel, he panicked or he wasn't familiar with where his lockup point was for that brake. He could have possible been speeding, coming up on a car 40 feet away at 80 miles an hour is pretty quick. Imrpoper time to check rear, use mirror. He just wasnt paying attention, bald back tire, theres tons of reasons why and frankly I don't see the point of this? And what do you mean by an "armchair riding newb?"

Im going to take the course, but im not gonna sit inside and just stare at my bike until the time comes for me to take it. There are plenty of people out there riding that have never been down and also never had the course and there are also people who have taken the course and been down. I would really like to see the statistics on Number of crashes of Non-MSF grads vs. Number of crashes of MSF grads. I think it would be interesting. But for now, I take it slow, I stay inside my envelope, I know my machine and its limits, and I keep my fingers crossed that I don't wreck due to something I missed in MSF. Take care.

Tony... Thanks for the excersice, I've do that alot while on the road, push right turn right. And way before I started riding I read about the "death grip" and I got it controlled early on. I have had to experiance a quick lane change and a pretty bad swerve (bald D207) and its scary as hell but I learned. I agree that stopping quickly in a parking lot is somewhat un-comparable to that of a real life situation, which is why I do both.Thanks.
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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-27-2002, 07:51 AM
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1.) He was paying attention to his immediate path of travel, which is 4 seconds in front of you. And it doesn't sound like he was doing SIPDE.
2.) Having just spent a weekend that included practicing locking my rear, I think he went down because he looked down. It feels spooky when the rear moves around but if you keep your head up the bike brakes straight. So even if your not good with your brake balance that doesn't necessarily mean the bike will go down.
3.) I accidently left out the detail that he had road rash on his elbow and rear. Where's his damn gear?

Quote:
There are plenty of people out there riding that have never been down and also never had the course and there are also people who have taken the course and been down. I would really like to see the statistics on Number of crashes of Non-MSF grads vs. Number of crashes of MSF grads. I think it would be interesting. But for now, I take it slow, I stay inside my envelope, I know my machine and its limits, and I keep my fingers crossed that I don't wreck due to something I missed in MSF
Other than the Hurt report that was commisioned by the state of California in 1979 there are no centrally collected and compared stats. Guess nobody cares about riders except other riders. Bill Hurt says he still sees people doing the same things wrong now. I don't know if MSF makes better riders so much as it gives people the tools to be better and it's there choice after that. Kyle I'm just thinking in print. .02 Later
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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-27-2002, 10:42 AM Thread Starter
 
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My final word: There is alot you must understand, know, realize, and respect while riding a motorcycle. MSF can instill these ideas and habits into your bank of knowledge, but just knowing is not enough. Using them without the realization that you are is key. "Second Nature" if you will.


Actually there are more stats, courtesy of many sources. NTSB, Various state highway authorities... here are som links.

http://www.womanmotorist.com/motorcy...cles_toc.shtml

http://www.geocities.com/juliansolos/Stat.html

http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/inju...search7-8.html


those are just some. Happy reading
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