Expert Riders Please Help! A Good Starter Bike? - Sportbike Forum: Sportbike Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-26-2002, 07:36 PM Thread Starter
 
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Expert Riders Please Help! A Good Starter Bike?

I am 17, and will be buying a bike this summer when I turn 18. Any suggestions on a used bike that has a reasonable price range for me with ample power that would keep me entertained for a couple years yet offers some nice features to a new rider. I have some experience riding and I am looking forward to getting into sport bikes. Suggestions please.

Thanks

Added note: I am open minded about the manufacturer and bike. I would, although, like something bigger than 500cc so I can keep up with everyone else. I have considered these manufacturers so far in this order, Honda, Yamaha, and Suzuki.
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-26-2002, 08:17 PM
 
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yeah I was your age when I destroyed my first bike!

Honestly any of the 600's would suit you fine, IMO stay away from the r6's, some here may disagree with me but I dont thing they are a good beginner.

If I were you, I'd just go and get about a '96/'97/'98 kitana, One because they are low priced, and two because they dont have too much power, but enough to satisfy you. Or if you want something that's a real eye catcher, go hunt down a 94-96 suzuki rf600r.

Good luck, and welcome to SBW!
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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-26-2002, 09:35 PM Thread Starter
 
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Why stay away from r6's?
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-27-2002, 09:06 AM
 
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Its just my opinion, but I've ridden a few different r6's. They all ride the same, they are a lot less forgiving that the other 600's, the bike is twitchy I guess you could say. It's not a smooth ride like the other 600's which is what you really need in a first bike so you can learn the basics and learn to ride... not just control a wild bike.
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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-27-2002, 11:50 AM
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If this is your first bike..IMHO..you'd much better off getting a GS500, or SV650..these bikes are much more forgiving, and they will allow you to progress much faster..as in it's more fun to ride a slow bike fast, than to ride a fast bike slow.. But if your dead set on getting a 600, then a older F3 or YZR 600 ..the important thing, is to get a bike YOU like, and that's comfortable to you..everyone is different..so find a bike that fits you...

K...as for "keeping up" with your buds.....DON'T worry about it..ride in your comfort zone, don't let anyone push you, and don't ride over your head..that's how riderz DIE.. If all this seems like I'm preachin to ya...? Your right, cause I'd like to see ride for yrs. to come..and you can always get a bigger bike..

Good luck, and welcome to the Addiction.. Oh..have you taken the MSF course yet..? if not, take it, and get some quality gear..

Old, Slow, but ...Smooth
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-28-2002, 10:00 AM
 
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I've got an '02 SV650s with about 600 miles on it I'll sell ya. It's an awesome bike and I love it to death (and my average 52 mpg right now hehehe) but it's keeping my squid tendancies at bay. I want to go get an Interceptor.

At any rate... the MSF was definately worth it. 600 miles and not even any close calls yet. Keeping your eyes open is 90% of it, I ride fast when I think it's safe (since you're never really safe on a bike, even sitting in the garage it could fall over and break your foot hehe) and I ride overly cautious all the rest of the time. If I see someone I think is going to do something stupid, I slow down or move away etc etc. That way, if it's nothing I lose nothing, and if they have a stupid fit I was expecting it and already prepared for it.
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-28-2002, 09:17 PM
 
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I drive a tow truck here in Mass, so I see a lot of accidents. The other day, I get a call from the State Police for a motorcycle accident. The 17-year-old rider, who only had his learner's permit, was basically unhurt. The brand new '02 R1 that he was riding, however, was banged up pretty good.

As I loaded his bike onto the truck, he explained that he was coming around the corner and saw a car stopped in the roadway. He swerved to avoid it but hit some sand and went down. This was his story, so I can't say how true it was. I think this kid was lucky that he didn't get hurt and even luckier that he, hopefully, got a good enough scare to make him get a smaller bike or at least treat that R1 with the respect it deserves. I just couldn't believe that the dealer would sell someone so young and inexperienced such a powerful bike. Oh, and he was on his way back from his first day of MSF Rider School.

There is a world of difference between a 600 and a 1000. Is one more or less fun than the other? I'd say that depends of the rider's preference. But if you're a new rider, I'd learn on a 600 before I decided that I needed the power of the 1000.
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-29-2002, 08:46 AM
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i agree with hammer whole-heartedly.

maybe i was the only one who was broke at 18, but have you considered an 84 or so gpz550? maybe the ever-wonderful hurricane 600? or a real legend--the rz350? how about a any 550 or so cc ujm (universal japanese motorcycle)? the gs500 is an awesome choice. gs500rider on this board passed many a 600 on his at the track.

you don't need to worry about keeping up with anyone. it's the best way to get hurt. but if you learn how to ride right, you will never need to worry about keeping up with anyone.

Tony

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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-29-2002, 09:30 AM
 
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Re: Expert Riders Please Help! A Good Starter Bike?

Quote:
Originally posted by disque71
I am open minded about the manufacturer and bike. I have considered these manufacturers so far in this order, Honda, Yamaha, and Suzuki.
Am I missing something here?
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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-29-2002, 10:16 AM
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I started on a brand new 2000 CBR600 F4. I got my permit two days before buying the bike. I had to have one of my buddies ride it home for me, and once home it took me about 20 minutes to teach myself how everything worked. After about a week or two I was riding comfortably around town (Indianapolis) and by the end of the month I was venturing out onto Interstates and getting more and more comfortable. You don't necessarily have to start on a brand new bike, but a 600 is a great size to start on. I never dropped mine, but I am 6'2" and about 200 lbs, so if it ever started to go down I could usually catch it, but that rarely happened. I went with the Honda because after talking to many other Honda owners, it seemed in my opinion that the engineering was a little more solid. Sure it may not be the fastest or anything, but it was easy to ride, reliable, forgiving to beginner mistakes, and it was plenty powerful is i wanted/needed it to be. Most importantly, get a bike you like and are comfortable on, and definitely take a safety course! I wish I had. Just be careful and don't ride outside your comfort level, as most bikes are much more capable than new riders realize, and learn at your own pace.

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