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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-20-2004, 09:58 PM Thread Starter
 
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Exclamation Computer Hacking Question

Question for all of us non computer savy people out here. I was the victim of identity theft a couple of years ago with two credit cards while in Florida and a fake drivers license. Anyway, since I'm military, I do most of my finances online because the mail service is too slow when deployed. I was always curious about how the individual (who they caught when he was in an accident with my fake license) got my information, e.g. DL #, mother's maiden name, credit card info etc. I just finished doing a search on google on "aol passwords" and at least fifty sites came up, each saying for a fee they could attain any password for any email service. Some sites offered spy programs which you could record any keystrokes on a persons computer and have them emailed to you for only $40. My question I guess is how do you know if someone has done this to you since the program runs in the background? Or any "secure" email sites. Thanks, MB
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-21-2004, 06:08 AM
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Get off AOL if you can. I've read because they are so big they are more prone to attack. Also don't use your mom's maiden name as a password as it's too easy for some asshole theif to get. Use something else like your favorite dog's name, something only YOU would know. Also shread or tear-up everything with your name on it when you throw it away.

As far as the computer stuff: Never store any credit info or sensitive data on an "internet computer"!!! Make sure you have some kind of Firewall, Anti Virus, AND Anti Spywear programs loaded, up-dated, and RUNNING. Also use a password that is at least 7 characters long. Be sure to use upper/lower case letters and numbers.

These friggin "Hackers" and identity theives need to be hung by their balls and all their fingers "Hacked" off! let them try typing without any fingers.

Now back to motorcycles.

A few ccs short of a full litre.

Last edited by mac020; 08-21-2004 at 06:18 AM.
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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-21-2004, 07:24 AM Thread Starter
 
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Does anyone know how to set up wep encryption on a Netgear WG311T wireless modem?
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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-21-2004, 11:27 PM
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There should be a built-in application on the router (check your documention on how to start it). Within that application, there will be a screen where you allow and deny devices with a MAC. Deny EVERYTHING except the devices that you own.

Oh, NEVER shop at internet stores that do not encrypt sensitive data! There should be a picture of a padlock, key or something to that effect at the lower right corner of your browser (most browsers). Anyone with 'sniffer' that is close enough to your trunk will be able to grab that information and read it.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-23-2004, 05:57 AM
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I use Zone Alarm Pro and it works wonders, especially the 'cache cleaner'. To touch passwords again.... Make them a pretty good length and use special characters like a '3' for 'E' or an '@' for 'A'. Most brute force attacks to crack dumped passwords will spend too long of a time trying to crack a password that uses special characters for it to even be worth it. For example, if you wanted to make your password "eatshit", make it something like '[email protected]$H/T' or something like that. My guess is something like that will take at least a month to crack.

As for the transactions online...I don't think that they will ever be safe. I think ebay now does all transactions at 128 bit SSL, but not sure.

Good luck to you.

--There is a wrong way to eat a Reese's, and I will find it.
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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-23-2004, 07:33 AM
 
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Statistically, the majority of security breaches occur from INSIDE the corporate networks. This means that even a company dedicated to privacy of customer data is vulnerable to an attack by unethical employee with access to the database. Someone in the IT department of your credit card company could steal all the information you put down on the application, and even the strongest encryption you would use online can't protect against that. I second the suggestion that you should not store your credit card info on vendor web sites.
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-23-2004, 08:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally posted by veektor
Statistically, the majority of security breaches occur from INSIDE the corporate networks. This means that even a company dedicated to privacy of customer data is vulnerable to an attack by unethical employee with access to the database. Someone in the IT department of your credit card company could steal all the information you put down on the application, and even the strongest encryption you would use online can't protect against that. I second the suggestion that you should not store your credit card info on vendor web sites.
You're absolutely right, and was going to touch on that but don't want to get too in depth.

IMHO, nobody's info will ever be safe. Just the world we live in.

--There is a wrong way to eat a Reese's, and I will find it.
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-23-2004, 03:07 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by veektor
Statistically, the majority of security breaches occur from INSIDE the corporate networks. This means that even a company dedicated to privacy of customer data is vulnerable to an attack by unethical employee with access to the database. Someone in the IT department of your credit card company could steal all the information you put down on the application, and even the strongest encryption you would use online can't protect against that. I second the suggestion that you should not store your credit card info on vendor web sites.
Well, I was in IT for the better part of 10 years. Yes, I (and others) had total control over entire server farms, but we were always so busy, we never had a chance to think about that kind of thing. The worst I think we've ever thought about was to the effect of, "Let's just drop this sh*t and go have an early lunch." I'm not saying that unethical IT employees don't exist, but I think that IT people love computers and technology and know the consequences, to risk credit card fraud or ID theft.

Bottom line, I agree that IT folks DO have the access and ability, but I don't believe the majority of this sort of activity originates within the realm of IT. I'm curious to know where the statistics come from.
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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-24-2004, 10:17 AM
 
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Hey, I'm not knocking the IT people, 'cause I'm in the industry myself. But with thousands(?) of good people doing their best for the customer, it can take only one a$$hole with access to the right system to steal data on millions of customer accounts.

You are probably right to question my use of word "statistics". I guess I am just repeating what I read in various industry publicatons about security. I will try to come up with some numbers and post that data when I have time, if I can find time.
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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 08-24-2004, 10:52 AM
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I am in the IT field also, and soon will probably have an entire network to myself and a few others once I get my new job. I just don't see the benefits of the risks. There are some people out there who just can't resisit the opportunity. Very few rarely how difficult it is for someone to recover from ID theft, etc...

--There is a wrong way to eat a Reese's, and I will find it.
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