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post #11 of 24 (permalink) Old 03-13-2007, 04:36 PM
 
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I've been getting in the 40mpg range before the fuel light comes on. 4.7gallon tank. It'll usually start flashing around the 130 mile mark.

How many miles do you have on your bike? My first tank I only got 101 miles before the light came on. For the first couple tank fulls I only got about 34-35mpg. It improved after about 800-1000 miles.

Mines the 750 but the bikes are almost identical.
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post #12 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-02-2007, 08:38 PM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by Whitebread
I've been getting in the 40mpg range before the fuel light comes on. 4.7gallon tank. It'll usually start flashing around the 130 mile mark.

How many miles do you have on your bike? My first tank I only got 101 miles before the light came on. For the first couple tank fulls I only got about 34-35mpg. It improved after about 800-1000 miles.

Mines the 750 but the bikes are almost identical.
I believe i'm just past 5,000 miles so you'd think whatever i get now is for good! Honestly i forgot about this thread! haha I'll have to do a range test sometime for myself...it's something everyone should know about their bikes.
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post #13 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-04-2008, 05:06 AM
 
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Vash, is this why people say these bikes really get an increase of power just from an air filter kit?
I still run my OEM filter but was told a K&N really helps.
Great explanation of the fuel system.
Thanks
Glen
04 750 Blu/Wht
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post #14 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-04-2008, 05:46 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skiddy View Post
i have an 06 gsxr 600 too.
the gas light is a 2 - stage light
it will begin to blink when you have approx 1.0 gal. of gas left, and then will stay lit with approx. 0.3 gal. of gas left
(and that's excluding your reserve i think)
You probably don't have a reserve on your bike. Your "reserve" starts when the light starts flashing. If you keep going, you run out of gas.

"The only difference between death and taxes is that death doesn't get worse every time Congress meets."
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post #15 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-04-2008, 04:07 PM
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Originally Posted by Vash View Post
Motorcycles run on an open loop system, in other words, there is no oxygen sensor in the exhaust to determine how complete the combustion was, and adjust fuel accordingly.
Most motorcycles. The 08 R6 is closed loop. Hopefully a sign of things to come.

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Originally Posted by gp42gpw View Post
Vash, is this why people say these bikes really get an increase of power just from an air filter kit?
I still run my OEM filter but was told a K&N really helps.
Great explanation of the fuel system.
On most recent sportbikes, most tuners will say that you will lose power with a washable filter. Not much... a pony or two, but some loss. What you gain is a filter you don't have to buy again. I have washable filters in all my bikes, and it's one of the first things I do. Now in the day of carberated machines, there was potential for gain just from the filter. Now, the factory does a real good job.

And yes, good explanation. Vash can explain with the best of them.
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You probably don't have a reserve on your bike. Your "reserve" starts when the light starts flashing. If you keep going, you run out of gas.
+1 on this. Some of the good old fashioned reserve petcocks were responsible for engines running lean, and thats not good. Now, most go with a warning light. After that you get to push.

Dan
1991 FZR 1000 - built 1040 with race cams, Akrapovic full exhaust, and mild suspension work
2004 YZF R1 - Graves full exhaust, velocity stacks, BMC race filter, and Power Commander. Rear Ohlins. Forks rblt with Race Tech springs and Gold Valves.
2005 20th Anniversary V-Max (0098/2000) - T boost,
2005 YZF R6 track bike - Graves full exhaust, Race Tech suspension
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post #16 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-04-2008, 04:24 PM
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+1 on this. Some of the good old fashioned reserve petcocks were responsible for engines running lean, and thats not good. Now, most go with a warning light. After that you get to push.
I should add that you don't want to rely on that light. Instead, find out how far you can average on a tank, and reset the trip meter religiously at every fillup.

Last summer my bike ran out of gas on the interstate in a construction zone where both sides were lined with k-rails. Not fun. Light never came on, and that was the 1 time I forgot to reset my trip odometer.

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post #17 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-04-2008, 04:44 PM
 
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Washable filters are extremly overhyped. On engines in low state of tune a less restrictive filter can help power/economy since the engine doesnt have to suck air as hard.
In an engine that is in a high state of tune, a great deal of power comes from overpacking the cylinder. Designers use any trick they can to cram more air/fuel into the cylinder than it would normally hold. One of the ways of doing this is to force the air/fuel mixture to run down a long skinny tube. The air builds a great deal of momentum, since it is flowing real fast. Once the cylinder fills up, the air is still flowing down the tube, and continues to cram into the cylinder, yielding more power. The trade off is that all that momentum ruins throttle responce, so the engine feels less "snappy". This is partly compensated by using larger and larger airbox.
Another way to overcram the cylinder is to use the sound/pressure waves. When the intake valve opens, a "pop", a pressure wave escapes the cylinder and travels up the intake, then it gets to the airbox, bounces off a few times, and eventually starts traveling back down the intake. If everything gets timed just right, it will arive at the intake valve right before it closes, giving the cylinder one last push of air/fuel. This description is oversimplifying things, but you can see that its a pretty delicate process. By changing the resistance of the filter, and especially by changing the shape of the filter, this delicate balance gets knocked off. After that, its a matter of chance, sometimes things could improve a touch, Since bike manufacturers have noise standards to deal with and couldnt tune the engine for max power, but most of the time, the power will go down a notch, since filter manufacturers can't put as much time and money into r&d, as the engine manufacturers do. They just copy the paper product, slap a bunch of silly claims on the box, and look for suckers that think they can be so much cooler if they spend an extra $50 on their filter.

At the end of the day however, a better rider will be faster on a slower bike than the opposite. Even extensive engine modifications make very slight difference on lap times. The biggest improvement you can get from parts in terms of lap times would be better tires.

Forget getting aftermarket stuff for you bike, save that money and go do a few track days. Is it better to compare how fast your bike could go, or how fast you can go on it?



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post #18 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-04-2008, 08:06 PM
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At the end of the day however, a better rider will be faster on a slower bike than the opposite. Even extensive engine modifications make very slight difference on lap times. The biggest improvement you can get from parts in terms of lap times would be better tires.

Forget getting aftermarket stuff for you bike, save that money and go do a few track days. Is it better to compare how fast your bike could go, or how fast you can go on it?
Another awesome explanation, Vash... but I think you made the tires comment just to get me out of hiding .

Suspension... bro. At least get it set for your weight, and as close to properly damped as possible. In many cases this can be done without spending money. In others, springs may be needed, and lastly, valving.

But I agree 100% on the track days! Speaking of which... missed you at VIR . My friends are going to the 5 May Cornerspeed dates, and I will be back the weekend of the 19th (a NESBA weekend). Let me know if you are going to make it. Like I said before, you have a place to stay. And if my friends and I are there you can pitt with us.

Dan
1991 FZR 1000 - built 1040 with race cams, Akrapovic full exhaust, and mild suspension work
2004 YZF R1 - Graves full exhaust, velocity stacks, BMC race filter, and Power Commander. Rear Ohlins. Forks rblt with Race Tech springs and Gold Valves.
2005 20th Anniversary V-Max (0098/2000) - T boost,
2005 YZF R6 track bike - Graves full exhaust, Race Tech suspension
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post #19 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-06-2008, 02:51 PM
 
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Dan, believe me I wish I could've been there. It seems that I have to take some time away from riding, it kills me, but what can you do. I should be back with a vengance next year, but so far I've barely had time to get the bike out twice, and no track days at all. Sucks, but it will be worth it. Good chance I will be showing up with a different bike.

As for the suspension/tires thing, I dont consider setting your stock suspension an upgrade (its free), and I could argue that going from a worn out crappy tire to a new dual compound will help more than a new front end.



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post #20 of 24 (permalink) Old 04-06-2008, 06:54 PM
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Dan, believe me I wish I could've been there. It seems that I have to take some time away from riding, it kills me, but what can you do. I should be back with a vengance next year, but so far I've barely had time to get the bike out twice, and no track days at all. Sucks, but it will be worth it. Good chance I will be showing up with a different bike.

As for the suspension/tires thing, I dont consider setting your stock suspension an upgrade (its free), and I could argue that going from a worn out crappy tire to a new dual compound will help more than a new front end.
You'll be back in the saddle before you know it. Heck... next year I may have an extra you can use out here. Working on a race only R6, hopefully in time to make the season ender this year.

Free... but how often overlooked in favor of something aftermarket, just because it's aftermarket? I talk to tons of riders all the time and when I say sag they ask me where you can buy it. The absolute best upgrade is the one where you have the nut attaching the seat to the bars adjusted. Then it goes from bike to bike with you.

Good to be conversing with ya again.

Dan
1991 FZR 1000 - built 1040 with race cams, Akrapovic full exhaust, and mild suspension work
2004 YZF R1 - Graves full exhaust, velocity stacks, BMC race filter, and Power Commander. Rear Ohlins. Forks rblt with Race Tech springs and Gold Valves.
2005 20th Anniversary V-Max (0098/2000) - T boost,
2005 YZF R6 track bike - Graves full exhaust, Race Tech suspension
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