bike ride height - Sportbike Forum: Sportbike Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-08-2008, 09:25 PM Thread Starter
 
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bike ride height

I am currently riding a 08 r6 and I was wondering..

I weigh 220lbs and the bike seems to be low as i can stand with both feet flat and knees bent..should I raise the suspension, and if so how exactly do I accomplish that correctly? Should I be on tip toes when the bike is vertical?

To see if I am heading in the right direction, is it ok to assume you simply adjust the rearsets up with the nut by the shock?

Last edited by CypreSs187; 01-08-2008 at 09:27 PM.
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-09-2008, 03:57 AM
 
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The collar on the shock and the nuts on the top of the forks adjust spring preload (which actually is not preload, but thats what its called). This affects the ride height, but indirectly, so you shouldnt use that for that perpose. The idea is to set your static sag, in other words, how far the suspension compresses when you sit on the bike. The suspension should compress about 1.25" with you on the bike. This way, it has plenty more to compress when it hits a bump, but if you come over a pothole, the suspension can extend and reach the ground. However with your weight, I'm guessing you will not be able to get the right sag with the stock spring (you might, but I doubt it) and will likely have to get new ones. You can get them from race tek for a couple of hundred dollars.

The other way to adjust ride height is by using linkages on the rear shock and sliding the forks further down in the tripple trees. The important thing is to adjust both the front and rear by the same ammount. If you dont, you will change your rake and trail, which could make the bike less manuvarable, or dangerously unstable.



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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-09-2008, 04:07 AM Thread Starter
 
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In your opinion do you think street or track performance is affected by this ? I assume they make stock settings the most stable but probably with 170 lb people in mind.
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-09-2008, 04:14 AM
 
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Actually stock setting have more like 150lbs or lighter people in mind. Hey, they are made in japan.

Getting the sag right is the first and most important part of getting your suspension set. Factory settings are just a guess, they are not the most stable. Having the right settings make all the difference in the world on both street and track.

Without the proper settings yous suspension can bottom out easily, especially when you are braking into the corner. This will result in your front tire trying to slide, which is well, bad.

Also, it takes slightly different settings for street and track. The more level the surface (track) the less sag you need since there arent as many holes to extend your tires into, so you get closer to 1" of sag, and leave more of your suspension travel for braking. With bad pavement (street) you need more sag to count for the bumps, and less for braking since you arent going to be braking as hard



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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-09-2008, 04:16 AM Thread Starter
 
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just for the hell of it here are some pics of me sitting on it. does it look a bit overloaded to you?
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-09-2008, 04:17 AM Thread Starter
 
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-09-2008, 04:18 AM Thread Starter
 
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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-09-2008, 04:27 AM
 
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Its really hard to tell from those pics, however, you shouldnt be riding in shorts

Here is an easy way to tell. Have a friend (or two) lift the front of the bike so that the front tire is off the ground. Measure the distance between the fork casting and the outer tube (the black inner tube is basically what you are measuring). Then sit on the bike, in full gear, feet up. Have a friend suport the bike from the rear so that its not on the kick stand, and have another friend measure the same distance. Subtract the small number from the big one. If the result is more than 1.375" than your bike is overloaded.

For the rear, measure from the axle to some point above it on the tail. Doesnt matter what point, as long as you use the same one.



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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-09-2008, 05:38 AM Thread Starter
 
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well its obvious I am comfused..

Am I hearing you right that I should:

A) Max Out Preload tension with stock settings and see if that is enough (using the nut under the spring)

or

B) Get New Spring



Thanks for all the help btw.
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 01-09-2008, 05:51 AM
 
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Ok. First measure the sag on both the front and rear end, with the settings you got now. Record these measurments, as well as the settings so you can go back to them later, if you tottally mess up everything.

Start adjusting your settings to get the ideal sag. I would start by turning the adjustment all the way one way, measuring, then turning it all the way the other way and measuring again, this will tell you what happens to your sag as you turn the collar or preload on the forks. If you can get the proper sag by adjusting the collar/ fork preload, great. You are done.

If you cant, as in you turn the preload all the way and its still not enough, than you will need new springs.

Does that help?



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