Bike Height for proper foot placement - Sportbike Forum: Sportbike Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 04-07-2008, 04:08 AM Thread Starter
 
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Bike Height for proper foot placement

Okay, I'm fairly new to riding. I have a 2006 Kawi ZZR 600, which I'm trading in for a 2008 Suzuki GSXR750. I had the ZZR lowered a few inches so I could flat foot it at a stop (I'm about 5'2 - 5'3). I sat on a GSXR600 (which is the same seat height as a 750 - according to Suzuki.com) and the balls of my feet are on the ground (not tip-toeing). I'm debating if I should have the new one lowered as well. My riding experience has been last season & I took the Learn to Ride course. My main purpose for the bike is because I love riding - and the wonderful gas prices; I'm not in to stunts/tricks. Any input is greatly appreciated. Thanks!
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post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 04-07-2008, 04:21 AM
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I always advise against lowering bikes because of the negative effect it has on handling. They come from the factory set up pretty well, and the only tweaking you should have to do is setting it up for your weight. But if you lower it, it will not handle the same in the twisties. That's not to say you won't be able to have fun on it, but consider yourself cautioned.

I have an '05 Gixxer 600 and I can't flat foot on it unless I'm against the tank, which gets uncomfortable. But I'm to the point where 95% of my stops I don't even put my left down. The only exception would be on hills, or where there is gravel or sand and I want to keep both feet down in case the rear tries to break loose starting off.

Now since you say you are new to riding, do you think you are ready for the power of a GSX-R750? That's a pretty potent bike. Just be careful and consider putting some more time in on your current bike until things like flat-footing aren't a concern.

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post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 04-07-2008, 04:24 AM
 
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I wouldnt lower a bike unless you absolutely have to. I tip toe my bike, and it very rarely caused me any problems. Lowering a bike sacrifices handling.



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post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 04-07-2008, 04:38 AM Thread Starter
 
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Thanks guys, I appreciate the input. I don't think I'll lower it. I know that there is significantly more power with the 750. It doesn't bother me that I don't flat foot the bike, I just was wondering if there is a recommendation out there for proper bike height and if the bike should be adjusted. However, since it will handle best coming from the factory, then I'll stay with the standard.
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post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 04-09-2008, 04:24 AM
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You can have the suspension set up for your specific weight, but that's totally different from lowering it. If you're just a commuter then lowering it won't hurt anything but if you like hitting the twisties it'll feel like a totally different bike...and not in a good way.

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post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 04-09-2008, 08:50 AM
 
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I've made the same switch

My first bike as a 2001 ZX-6R, which is nearly identical to the ZZR600 of today. I now have a GSXR750. Like you, I'm short. The good news is, the GSXR600 & 750 have are virtually indistinguishable without their badging (there are about 3 little giveaways). The cockpit of each is the same, so if you fit on the 600, you'll fit on the 750. I studied them both in detail when I worked at a bike dealership.

The larger problem, and the one I still struggle with, is the suspension. Stock the GSXR comes set up for "average" male, with "average" riding conditions. I'm a girl, 5'4", 125 lbs, and love to get deep into the corners. That's a far cry from 5'10", 180 lbs guy, who stays mostly upright.

Without the money for a full suspension swap, it's been a struggle to find settings that work well for me. My goal is to test & tune my bike at the local track... they have a "test & tune" on Wednesday nights (20 minute session, 3 times, for $60). You might do well to talk to you local shop and figure out a good way to dial in your suspension and perhaps find a similar track deal in your area. There are also a lot of good (and bad) resources on the web.
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post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 04-09-2008, 09:25 AM Thread Starter
 
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Hey ChickOnABike - Thanks for the input...very much appreciated. I went back over to the dealership. This time, I had my riding boots on and I was more flat-footed than I originally thought. I'm really looking forward to getting my bike....as soon as it comes in! Well, if anyone is ever in the Rochester, NY area....let me know!
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post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 04-09-2008, 10:06 AM
 
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chickonbike:
Bikes are set up for the average japanese male, being about 150lbs, so your weight isnt as much of a problem as you think. The only part of setting up the suspension that it will have sagnificant effect on is setting up the sag, which you can do right at home, you never even have to start the bike. If you cannot get the sag set, you dont need to swap suspensions, just a new set of springs, which will run you a couple of hundred.

$60 for three sessions isnt a bad deal.



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post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 04-13-2008, 06:49 PM
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Lowering a bike isn't my cup of tea, however I do know a guy who did it without affecitng the bike too much. He can still tear it up in the twisites pretty well.

Unless you are big into track days the handling you'll loose won't be all that noticeable.

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post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 04-14-2008, 04:07 AM
 
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Lowering

For the sake of others who might read this thread who are considering lowering their bike:

If you lower the rear, you should lower the front too if you want to keep the handling the as good as possible. But if you're not riding hard, your not going to notice the difference enough to justify the cost of doing this. But if the width of the unridden portion of your tire is measured in millimeters, you might want to consider investing in the time and money for a suspension set up.
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